Raising vs buying replacement heifers

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VanC

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DiamondSCattleCo":6dm0un9b said:
Let me ask this question, and this is a serious question:

For all of you who feel that raising your own replacements is expensive, how is it that the guy selling the heifer replacements is making money?

Rod

Rod has asked this question twice and nobody has answered it directly yet. Why not? Just curious.
 

Crowderfarms

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VanC":1fefzjnm said:
DiamondSCattleCo":1fefzjnm said:
Let me ask this question, and this is a serious question:

For all of you who feel that raising your own replacements is expensive, how is it that the guy selling the heifer replacements is making money?

Rod

Rod has asked this question twice and nobody has answered it directly yet. Why not? Just curious.
My opinion?He's not making what he thinks. IF the Calf had been sold at 500 lbs, I feel you're dollars ahead, once you measure in health expenses,feed and hay, and wondering first off will that Heifer make the grade.?
 

novatech

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VanC":8cazff0u said:
DiamondSCattleCo":8cazff0u said:
Let me ask this question, and this is a serious question:

For all of you who feel that raising your own replacements is expensive, how is it that the guy selling the heifer replacements is making money?

Rod

Rod has asked this question twice and nobody has answered it directly yet. Why not? Just curious.

I answered. I sell mine at weaning age and let the buyer take all the risk.
Other than that many people never put a pencil to it. I have so I do not grow them out. If one has to feed those heifers it is a dead loss. If you think you are makeing money just because the are grass fed, wrong again. you have to figure the loss of an already produceing cow that you could be macking more money on with less risk. As Caustic said.
I posted a site that lets you fill out all the info for yourself. You check it out. There are some people that have there opinion and will refuse to do the math the way they tell you.
I can make the figures come out too, if I do not include all the costs.
And the worst is you cannot get anything better than you already had.
 

Caustic Burno

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novatech":11rs0p6k said:
VanC":11rs0p6k said:
DiamondSCattleCo":11rs0p6k said:
Let me ask this question, and this is a serious question:

For all of you who feel that raising your own replacements is expensive, how is it that the guy selling the heifer replacements is making money?

Rod

Rod has asked this question twice and nobody has answered it directly yet. Why not? Just curious.

I answered. I sell mine at weaning age and let the buyer take all the risk.
Other than that many people never put a pencil to it. I have so I do not grow them out. If one has to feed those heifers it is a dead loss. If you think you are makeing money just because the are grass fed, wrong again. you have to figure the loss of an already produceing cow that you could be macking more money on with less risk. As Caustic said.
I posted a site that lets you fill out all the info for yourself. You check it out. There are some people that have there opinion and will refuse to do the math the way they tell you.
I can make the figures come out too, if I do not include all the costs.
And the worst is you cannot get anything better than you already had.

Novatech IMO you know cattle.
 

VanC

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novatech":1rc3forl said:
VanC":1rc3forl said:
DiamondSCattleCo":1rc3forl said:
Let me ask this question, and this is a serious question:

For all of you who feel that raising your own replacements is expensive, how is it that the guy selling the heifer replacements is making money?

Rod

Rod has asked this question twice and nobody has answered it directly yet. Why not? Just curious.

I answered. I sell mine at weaning age and let the buyer take all the risk.
Other than that many people never put a pencil to it. I have so I do not grow them out. If one has to feed those heifers it is a dead loss. If you think you are makeing money just because the are grass fed, wrong again. you have to figure the loss of an already produceing cow that you could be macking more money on with less risk. As Caustic said.
I posted a site that lets you fill out all the info for yourself. You check it out. There are some people that have there opinion and will refuse to do the math the way they tell you.
I can make the figures come out too, if I do not include all the costs.
And the worst is you cannot get anything better than you already had.

Thanks. This makes perfect sense, but what about someone who wants an F1 that isn't particularly popular, so it's not readily available? He's pretty much stuck raising his own.

Also, how do you market the heifers you sell at weaning? Again, I'm just curious and trying to learn.
 

MikeC

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Most of the guys I know that raise replacement heifers are breeding F1's for either sending to a feedlot or at least they are backgrounding the steers and heifers to around 800 to 850 lbs before shipping.

They will cut the top off of the heifers and sell them for a few more dollars (whatever the market will bear) for immediate cash or maybe hold them in the pasture for a couple of months and breed them to sell as breds. Depends on grass.

There is no time lag in money supply, or income.

Buying a bunch of "put together" replacements from a sale barn or order buyer can be risky.
 

Wewild

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novatech":1mtdy8zd said:
I have seen several people cost out what it takes to raise a heifer to when she calves. None of this puts any dollar value on genetic improvement and the future income from that improvement. This is probably an imposability, But some estamites can be made in expected weight gains, calveing ease, ect.
As far as calculateing cost. You will never agree if you use different methods of calculateing.
I found this one and it looks pretty good.

http://www.extension.umn.edu/beef/compo ... esson6.pdf

Good link.

Long term goals

We are all about the long term goals and objectives as we have been doing this for a while with these cattle. We aren't in need of rapid expansion. We just need to retain 8-10% to replace the culls each year and we haven't been that high lately. We can easily maintain our genetic structure without spending time looking for animals at the barn that will and usually won't fit our program (there is a cost associated with this time spent). We like the closed herd approach as well.

Enterprise

The enterprise side is good as well. We decide long ago in our configuration that left us with some small pastures of around 15 acres (isolated from the larger ones) that it was best to retain heifers instead of put cows and another bull for 8 cows.
We don't have maternity pens so we can't make up a nickel in this part either.

Finical Considerations

I found it interesting that their cost for heifer replacements was $788.

I think our facilities including the small isolated pasture plays in our favor.

The genetic part weighs in more as retained cattle in themselves lead to the nature selection process over time. That having been said, you might expect a retained heifer to stay in the herd twice as long as a heavy bred 7 year old replacement. Sometimes you can't determine what the heifer will do at weaning. But after 30 years of raising retains you will be able to make that assessment with a higher degree of clarity than doing it the other way.

Thanks. Good link.
 

Bama

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Best way to look at is how much your making per acre. Your land is set, even when you rent or by more. You still have a certain amount of land. Now what is the most cost effective way to make money from that land. Yes you can sell bred heifers for more than a 600 pound weined calf. Now think how long that heifer spends on that land. That heifer is taking the place of more profitable cattle than can turn a profit faster. Remember you only have so much land to work with, you need to find the most profitable return to investment over a certain period of time. I track mine by how many dollars I make a day. Yea, I will keep a heifer occasionally. But she will be one of my absulute best that there ain't no way of replacing for nothing near what it will cost me to keep her up till breeding. There are times when keeping heifers pay off, most of the time it don't. I don't like buying bred heifers either. Your taking a chance. I can buy one with a calf by her side and its a known. Buying a known is much less risky than buying a unknown. If you do buy a unknown and everthing works out well, what have you really gained. One calf out of a cows lifetime ain't worth the chance.
 

novatech

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I sell my weaned heifers to the people that think they can raise them at a profit, and have never put a pencil to it.

I do keep a few heifers myself, the best of the best. Regestered, with certain genetics that I hope to better the breed I use as foundation stock. That is a dead loss as nobody really cares at this point. But that is another story.

Seems as though people forget that when they are raiseing cattle they are simpley trying to have the best machinery to convert grass to dollars. Feed and hay are not grass.

To me hybred vigor/F1 crosses are the best machines to convert grass. Breeding 2 F1's together is going backward.
The more genetic diference there are between breeds,the more vigor/heterosis.

Caustic I do not know cattle near as well as many people on these boards. which is why I am on here. But I do know how to use a pencil. And the pencil will work any way you want to direct it, If you don,t want to use all the information that you should.
 

DiamondSCattleCo

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I dug out my old long term pay back analysis, and did the numbers, but I want to double check them before posting it. I'm showing retaining heifers to come out a long way ahead, more than I expected, so I want to check for adding errors.

Anyway, I did more pencilling, including lost revenues, and no matter how I pencil it, I still come out ahead by retaining heifers.

Retaining:
Cost to keep cow for 1 yr - $327 (I finally got my books updated for last year. Thought I was higher than that.)
Feeding heifer calf to breeding age - $164
Feed cost to calving - $295 (based on 85% feed consumption as the animal isn't mature yet. I used 90% of the cost, as some fixed costs don't change whether the animal is mature or not)

That leaves me with $786 invested in that heifer which is set to drop a calf. This is consistent with both the link provided earlier, and other studies I've read from Saskatchewan.

Buying:
Cow cost - $327
Feeder cost - $164
Feeder income - $700 (based on heavy top end 8 weight price)
Cost of 6 month bred replacement heifer - $1200 (this would be the same quality of animal that I raise. Yes, I can buy cheaper, but why would you want to lower herd quality?)
Feeding 6 month bred heifer to calving - $160 Note that this is with my circumstances, calving in Feb. That means I'm feeding that bred animal throughout the time of the year with the most expense.

$1151 - total cost of purchased replacement thats ready to drop a calf.

A few points to note from some of the other messages:

Crowder - I know exactly what my costs/cow are from year to year. I include everything, including the cost of my work clothes.

Caustic - You have a good point about buying pairs or 3 'n' 1s, however you're also going to have a certain number of culls coming from those purchases. I bought some nice pairs last year for $1400, with calves close to weaning age. To get the $1400 price, I had to take a pen of 10 (half his choice, half mine), of which 4 I culled (1 with a poor calf, 2 bad dispositions when they dropped their new calves, 1 hard doer). Cow prices up here are poor, with the BSE closed border, so I only managed to fetch $200 for those culls. I got 685 for their calves, so I still lost $515 per cull, not including the feed I stuck into the three with bad dispositions/hard doing.

Probably the most important point that I've seen in this thread is from the study link:

"While the above is only an estimate, it is extremely important to analyze each line above for your actual cost."

You can ask people on the internet all day about their opinion, but every area is different. Different costs, different availability of replacements, different animals. The advice I can give you is to work the numbers out yourself, with YOUR costs of production and the costs of replacements in YOUR area.

Rod
 

novatech

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Ditto

You can ask people on the internet all day about their opinion, but every area is different. Different costs, different availability of replacements, different animals. The advice I can give you is to work the numbers out yourself, with YOUR costs of production and the costs of replacements in YOUR area.
 

Caustic Burno

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novatech":3kolzfx0 said:
I sell my weaned heifers to the people that think they can raise them at a profit, and have never put a pencil to it.

I do keep a few heifers myself, the best of the best. Regestered, with certain genetics that I hope to better the breed I use as foundation stock. That is a dead loss as nobody really cares at this point. But that is another story.

Seems as though people forget that when they are raiseing cattle they are simpley trying to have the best machinery to convert grass to dollars. Feed and hay are not grass.

To me hybred vigor/F1 crosses are the best machines to convert grass. Breeding 2 F1's together is going backward.
The more genetic diference there are between breeds,the more vigor/heterosis.

Caustic I do not know cattle near as well as many people on these boards. which is why I am on here. But I do know how to use a pencil. And the pencil will work any way you want to direct it, If you don,t want to use all the information that you should.

The most important tools in the tool box is a pencil.
You can't be profitable unless you really know what your cost are.
Second is to realize you are a grass farmer.
 

aplusmnt

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DiamondSCattleCo":3rb6kjs2 said:
I dug out my old long term pay back analysis, and did the numbers, but I want to double check them before posting it. I'm showing retaining heifers to come out a long way ahead, more than I expected, so I want to check for adding errors.

Anyway, I did more pencilling, including lost revenues, and no matter how I pencil it, I still come out ahead by retaining heifers.

Retaining:
Cost to keep cow for 1 yr - $327 (I finally got my books updated for last year. Thought I was higher than that.)
Feeding heifer calf to breeding age - $164
Feed cost to calving - $295 (based on 85% feed consumption as the animal isn't mature yet. I used 90% of the cost, as some fixed costs don't change whether the animal is mature or not)

That leaves me with $786 invested in that heifer which is set to drop a calf. This is consistent with both the link provided earlier, and other studies I've read from Saskatchewan.

Buying:
Cow cost - $327
Feeder cost - $164
Feeder income - $700 (based on heavy top end 8 weight price)
Cost of 6 month bred replacement heifer - $1200 (this would be the same quality of animal that I raise. Yes, I can buy cheaper, but why would you want to lower herd quality?)
Feeding 6 month bred heifer to calving - $160 Note that this is with my circumstances, calving in Feb. That means I'm feeding that bred animal throughout the time of the year with the most expense.

$1151 - total cost of purchased replacement thats ready to drop a calf.

A few points to note from some of the other messages:

Crowder - I know exactly what my costs/cow are from year to year. I include everything, including the cost of my work clothes.

Caustic - You have a good point about buying pairs or 3 'n' 1s, however you're also going to have a certain number of culls coming from those purchases. I bought some nice pairs last year for $1400, with calves close to weaning age. To get the $1400 price, I had to take a pen of 10 (half his choice, half mine), of which 4 I culled (1 with a poor calf, 2 bad dispositions when they dropped their new calves, 1 hard doer). Cow prices up here are poor, with the BSE closed border, so I only managed to fetch $200 for those culls. I got 685 for their calves, so I still lost $515 per cull, not including the feed I stuck into the three with bad dispositions/hard doing.

Probably the most important point that I've seen in this thread is from the study link:

"While the above is only an estimate, it is extremely important to analyze each line above for your actual cost."

You can ask people on the internet all day about their opinion, but every area is different. Different costs, different availability of replacements, different animals. The advice I can give you is to work the numbers out yourself, with YOUR costs of production and the costs of replacements in YOUR area.

Rod

I get confused with all this math, but one things I think you might have missed in your figures is that if you bought a Bred Heifer on the same day you sold the heifer that you could have retained you would have had one extra Calf to sell between the time of making that decision with the feeder heifer and her having her first calf. That would be an additional $500.00 or so of lost revenue with retaining a heifer.

Please Correct me if I am wrong!
 

CowpokeJ

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DiamondSCattleCo":1sewkl1a said:
I dug out my old long term pay back analysis, and did the numbers, but I want to double check them before posting it. I'm showing retaining heifers to come out a long way ahead, more than I expected, so I want to check for adding errors.

Anyway, I did more pencilling, including lost revenues, and no matter how I pencil it, I still come out ahead by retaining heifers.

Retaining:
Cost to keep cow for 1 yr - $327 (I finally got my books updated for last year. Thought I was higher than that.)
Feeding heifer calf to breeding age - $164
Feed cost to calving - $295 (based on 85% feed consumption as the animal isn't mature yet. I used 90% of the cost, as some fixed costs don't change whether the animal is mature or not)

That leaves me with $786 invested in that heifer which is set to drop a calf. This is consistent with both the link provided earlier, and other studies I've read from Saskatchewan.

Buying:
Cow cost - $327
Feeder cost - $164
Feeder income - $700 (based on heavy top end 8 weight price)
Cost of 6 month bred replacement heifer - $1200 (this would be the same quality of animal that I raise. Yes, I can buy cheaper, but why would you want to lower herd quality?)
Feeding 6 month bred heifer to calving - $160 Note that this is with my circumstances, calving in Feb. That means I'm feeding that bred animal throughout the time of the year with the most expense.

$1151 - total cost of purchased replacement thats ready to drop a calf.

A few points to note from some of the other messages:

Crowder - I know exactly what my costs/cow are from year to year. I include everything, including the cost of my work clothes.

Caustic - You have a good point about buying pairs or 3 'n' 1s, however you're also going to have a certain number of culls coming from those purchases. I bought some nice pairs last year for $1400, with calves close to weaning age. To get the $1400 price, I had to take a pen of 10 (half his choice, half mine), of which 4 I culled (1 with a poor calf, 2 bad dispositions when they dropped their new calves, 1 hard doer). Cow prices up here are poor, with the BSE closed border, so I only managed to fetch $200 for those culls. I got 685 for their calves, so I still lost $515 per cull, not including the feed I stuck into the three with bad dispositions/hard doing.

Probably the most important point that I've seen in this thread is from the study link:

"While the above is only an estimate, it is extremely important to analyze each line above for your actual cost."

You can ask people on the internet all day about their opinion, but every area is different. Different costs, different availability of replacements, different animals. The advice I can give you is to work the numbers out yourself, with YOUR costs of production and the costs of replacements in YOUR area.

Rod
On retaining, what are you considering breeding age? 23-28 mo. before she's ready to spit one out + 9 mo. spent in the cow, gives you a heifer that you've had around for probably at least 31 mo...so are you saying at that point you have $786 in her?
 

Wewild

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Bama":1kdoq7fx said:
I can buy one with a calf by her side and its a known. Buying a known is much less risky than buying a unknown. If you do buy a unknown and everthing works out well, what have you really gained. One calf out of a cows lifetime ain't worth the chance.

Good post as you have always seemed to manage your costs better than most.

We don't buy or for the most don't have unknowns. It comes down to where you are at your program or the program you want to be in.
 

DiamondSCattleCo

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aplusmnt":15k2ogvx said:
That would be an additional $500.00 or so of lost revenue with retaining a heifer.

Please Correct me if I am wrong!

I did a cash analysis above aplus, therefore opportunity costs don't enter into the equation. Besides, whats your true opportunity cost in this case? You've lost the $500 on the sale of a calf, but in return you now have a $1200 bred heifer. So you really haven't lost anything, but added $700 value to that $500 calf.

Edit: The one cost I didn't add in, but should have is the initial cost of the cow amortized across all its calves in its life. Its tough to peg that though since the cull market swings wildly up here these days. You have to start your herd somewhere, so you buy a $1200 heifer. She's going to deliver _at least_ 10 calves (or she'd better anyway), and at todays cull prices, she'll be worth $200. So add another $100 to the cost of the cow in my calculations which raises the cost of the replacement heifer to $886.

CowpokeJ

My heifers are dropping calves by 24 months of age. If they're not, they leave as I don't allow slow maturing animals to stay. So thats 9 months inside her dam (part of the $327), and another 15 months on feed/grass as either a feeder or a bred heifer.

As I said Cowpoke, my costs will not be the same as yours, and its important that each person do their own analysis of the situation.

Rod
 

DiamondSCattleCo

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All right, I broke down the numbers. Bear in mind this is a VERY simple cash flow analysis as I did it quickly. I'm working on a complex analysis (including interest), and putting it into spreadsheet format, but thats a ways off.

A few assumptions here:
1) This is based on MY current situation. I raise livestock in a low cost area, and I don't own a pile of expensive equipment. Example: my primary loader tractor is a 1973 1130 Massey and my backup is a 1967 Case 930.

2) My land costs each year are broken down on a $/cow basis and are included in the cost of keeping the cow for a year.

3) I cull heavily. Only my top ends get kept, which amounts to 2 or 3 animals in 50. When I buy, I buy at least equal to what I'm raising. I can't afford the really top end $2500 bred heifers right now.

4) I only sell yearling backgrounders. No fresh weaned calves leave here.

5) The cost of keeping a cow includes everything. Vaccinations, medications pro-rated over all animals, power bill, work clothing costs, etc etc. The cost of the heifer includes everything. Vaccines, meds, etc.

6) You have enough land to feed the animals you have on hand. I should have calculated income off excess land. This would add more income to the keeping replacements scenario, as in each year, you have 2 fewer AUs grazing and eating hay.

7) Both scenarios start at the same point: $5000 in the bank, 1 cow. The bull/AI is a constant cost between the two scenarios, so I left him out for ease of calculation. Only 1 heifer/yr will be retained or purchased. I also left out the amortized cow purchase price, since it was constant throughout the calculations.

Keeping Replacements
Year 1
Bank 5000
Cow cost -327 (I know I stated $350 earlier, but I hadn't looked at my books and I assumed that I was higher due to the large increase in diesel fuel costs last year)
Cost of heifer after weaning -164

Bank 4509

Year 2
Cow cost -327
Cost of heifer #1 -295 (Immature heifers, even bred ones, do not eat as heavily as a mature, bred cow. U of S figures from the 70s set the rate at 85%. I use 90%.)
Cost of heifer after weaning -164

Bank 3723

Year 3
Cow cost -327
Cost of heifer #1 -327
Cost of heifer #2 -295
Cost of heifer after weaning -164
Feeder cost -164
Income from feeder 700

Bank 3146

Year 4
Cow cost -327
Cost of heifer #1 -327
Cost of heifer #2 -327
Cost of heifer #3 -295
Cost of heifer after weaning -164
Feeder cost -328
Income from feeders 1400

Bank 2778

Year 5
Cow cost -327
Cost of heifer #1 -327
Cost of heifer #2 -327
Cost of heifer #3 -327
Cost of heifer #4 -295
Cost of heifer after weaning -164
Feeder cost -492
Income from feeders 2100

Bank 2619

Year 6
Cow cost -327
Cost of heifer #1 -327
Cost of heifer #2 -327
Cost of heifer #3 -327
Cost of heifer #4 -327
Cost of heifer #5 -295
Cost of heifer after weaning -164
Feeder cost -656
Income from feeders 2800

Bank 2669 - First year of "making" money

Year 7
Cow cost -327
Cost of heifer #1 -327
Cost of heifer #2 -327
Cost of heifer #3 -327
Cost of heifer #4 -327
Cost of heifer #5 -327
Cost of heifer #6 -295
Cost of heifer after weaning -164
Feeder cost -820
Income from feeders 3500

Bank 2928

Buying Replacements
Year 1
Bank 5000
Cow cost -327
Replacement heifer cost -1200
Replacement heifer feed cost-160
Feeder cost -164
Income from feeder 700

Bank 3849

Year 2
Cow cost -654
Replacement cost -1200
Replacement feed cost -160
Feeder cost -328
Income from feeder 1400

Bank 2907

Year 3
Cow cost -981
Replacement cost -1200
Replacement feed cost -160
Feeder cost -492
Income from feeder 2100

Bank 2174

Year 4
Cow cost -1308
Replacement cost -1200
Replacement feed cost -160
Feeder cost -656
Income from feeder 2800

Bank 1650

Year 5
Cow cost -1635
Replacement cost -1200
Replacement feed cost -160
Feeder cost -820
Income from feeder 3500

Bank 1335

Year 6
Cow cost -1962
Replacement cost -1200
Replacement feed cost -160
Feeder cost -984
Income from feeder 4200

Bank 1229

Year 7
Cow cost -2289
Replacement cost -1200
Replacement feed cost -160
Feeder cost -1148
Income from feeder 4900

Bank 1332 - First year of "making" money

You'll notice that it takes an extra year for the "buying replacements" scenario to begin an income increase, and your bank account dips considerably lower, despite having higher income from feeders each year. What this means is that with the costs I have entered, buying replacements costs you money.

One of things I didn't do was "spend my bank empty". In other words treat the "bank" amount as an initial investment budget. This amounts to lost opportunity in that the first year I could have bought feeders, bought more replacement animals or retained more heifers (by holding onto some of the investment dollars). Had I done this, the gulf between keeping replacements and buying replacements would have been considerably higher, as I'd now have income coming in at Year 1 with the keeping replacements scenario. Also, in the purchasing replacements scenario, as you work the numbers, you'll notice that you get into negative numbers for a couple years. This means you didn't have the bank or the budget to carry through the year. I ignored it, as you would have simply needed to carry more starting budget or borrowed. Either direction, the gulf between holding replacements or buying would have been wider still, as you'd have more budget available for opportunity projects.

Sorry for the length of the post. I tried to pare it down as much as I could.

Rod
 

novatech

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Diamond. I am not a CPA and am sure that there are very few of us on the boards that are. I do not have a clue what you are talking about. It looks like you are compareing the bought cows with raiseing your own with two diferent methods. The cost of cow escalates from year to year when you buy one. If you raise one the cost stays the same. With retaining them you list a bunch of heifers,Buying you list 1. Where is the cost of the heifer at start, if you had sold it, would not that amount be deducted from the price of the cow? That is $700 because you did not sell it? I will fully admit if you are doing this correctly I'm ???? :roll:
 

DiamondSCattleCo

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novatech":2xz58g3x said:
The cost of cow escalates from year to year when you buy one.

Sorry for the confusion, Nova. I got lazy and cut and pasted. In the second scenario, the cost of keeping a cow goes up each year as you have more more cows (the ones you had from the previous year + the replacement heifer you bought who is now a cow after having birthed her calf). In the first scenario, I simply kept the heifer line and kept cutting and pasting another one, adjusting the costs. Remember, each year you're either buying _another_ replacement or keeping another replacement back.

Rod
 

novatech

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I really think all this boils down to is what that heifer will bring and what you can buy replacements for. If you are buying 3 in 1 you will come out ahead, buying at the right price.

People that make a liveing at buying and selling cattle have a skill that was developed over time. It is knowing when to sell, and where. It is knowing what to buy, when and where. These people are so good at it they really take that skill for granted. They are really a lot sharper at it than they think and cannot understand why others don,t do it.

My situation is a lot different. I sell Regesterd culls, And F1 replacements. I usually get as much as I will have to pay for an older bred cow or even 3 in 1. I do not mind buying cows that are up to 12 yrs, old, if they are the right ones. I've got one cow thats 20 going to calve. Bad part, if I raise a heifer, I breed to calve as a 3 yr. old, Brahman are late matureing. So as you can see I would have to add a lot of time to my cost of raiseing one.
Breeding up my genetics, growing out heifers, is a dead loss for me, but is something I feel I should do.
 

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