Raising Breedstock

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Anonymous

I acquired about 160 acres of grassland in the TX panhandle a few years ago and have been running a few commercial cows. I have been looking for ways to make a little more money with them. One possibility I have thought about is to raise purebred calves which demand higher prices. However, I have no experience with this.

What are good breeds to consider at this time? How is marketing the heifers/bulls usually done? What percentage of the offspring of a high quality cow and high quality bull will display the traits that demand top dollar from breeders?

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Anonymous

I'd try Brahman derivatives like Brangus, Beefmaster, or Simbrah. They always seem to be real hardy cows. Other good and popular breeds are Angus(red & black) and Simmental. Try looking at <A HREF="http://www.cattle-today.com" TARGET="_blank">www.cattle-today.com</A> and find a breed that sounds appealing to you and find out if there's a market for it in your area. I'm sure the other people on this board will have some good advice. They usually do. As far as marketing, I'd get involved with your breed's association both state and national. Try and see if there are any purebred sales or replacement heifer and bull sales and market a few cattle that way. That'd be a good way to get your name out there.



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Anonymous

> I acquired about 160 acres of
> grassland in the TX panhandle a
> few years ago and have been
> running a few commercial cows. I
> have been looking for ways to make
> a little more money with them. One
> possibility I have thought about
> is to raise purebred calves which
> demand higher prices. However, I
> have no experience with this.

> What are good breeds to consider
> at this time? How is marketing the
> heifers/bulls usually done? What
> percentage of the offspring of a
> high quality cow and high quality
> bull will display the traits that
> demand top dollar from breeders?

Hi Cody,

Raising breeding stock can be very enjoyable and sometimes more profitable than commercial cattle, but it will take more time to do it right and be successful.

Most breed associations now require (or highly suggest) taking weights of the calves at birth, weaning, and as yearlings. In addition to that you will have to maintain accurate records including breeding dates, calving dates, weights, sire, dam, etc.

Most successful seedstock suppliers are also good at marketing their cattle. You need to promote your herd and cattle. Just putting a sign up "bulls for sale" next to your driveway won't likely bring you much business. This requires ads in local ag papers, farm signs, sponsoring local 4-H awards, and getting involved in local and state beef associations.

Successful seedstock breeders also have a good understanding of the beef business. They understand the needs of the commercial beef producer, have a good understanding of the latest in beef technology (i.e. epds, grid marketing, etc.), and they know what differentiates a good animal from a poor one (both in physical appearance and in genetics). In today's beef business seedstock suppliers are often expected to be an expert who provides their commercial customers with advice on marketing, breeding decisions and other beef production related information.

I have heard it said that the average beef seed stock producer stays in business for seven years. Too often cattle producers think they can make big bucks by raising breeding stock. They think if they buy a registered bull and some heifers of a certain breed that they are automatically in the purebred business and that it will be no problem selling the resulting calves for big bucks. Most find out that it isn't that easy.

As far as breeds go, find out from local stockyard managers and commercial cattle producers what breeds do well in your area. However, don't choose a breed in which there are already several breeders in the area in which you plan to sell breeding stock. For example here in Indiana there are more Angus breeders than any other breed, consequently it is difficult for new Angus breeders in our area to sell bulls and heifers since there is already so much competition.

Good luck!
 
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Anonymous

> However, don't choose a breed in
> which there are already several
> breeders in the area in which you
> plan to sell breeding stock. For
> example here in Indiana there are
> more Angus breeders than any other
> breed, consequently it is
> difficult for new Angus breeders
> in our area to sell bulls and
> heifers since there is already so
> much competition.

Hope Frankie sees your negativity and properly chastises you.

"Come on, try to find something positive to share with posters on this board. "

You know that it is a serious offense to say anything that doesn't imply that EVERYONE should be breeding straightbred angus. Even if what you say makes sense. And EVERYTHING in your post makes a lot of sense.
 
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Anonymous

in my opinion, Gary's post was very positive. He offered some facts and suggestions about how one might go about being profitable. Still waiting for something as good from you, John S.

> Hope Frankie sees your negativity
> and properly chastises you.

> "Come on, try to find
> something positive to share with
> posters on this board. "

> You know that it is a serious
> offense to say anything that
> doesn't imply that EVERYONE should
> be breeding straightbred angus.
> Even if what you say makes sense.
> And EVERYTHING in your post makes
> a lot of sense.
 
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A

Anonymous

I agree this post was very good. I think people need to know about these things before they go go into raiseing any thing.
> in my opinion, Gary's post was
> very positive. He offered some
> facts and suggestions about how
> one might go about being
> profitable. Still waiting for
> something as good from you, John
> S.
 
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Anonymous

Still waiting for
> something as good from you, John
> S.

Here you go. I am POSITIVE that you are the voice of reason when compared to your fellow AAA guy, Blackpower.
 

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