• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Question for Vicki the Vet

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

Guest
Vicki, I read you comments about breed temperament below. Do you have any experience with Texas Longhorns? Also, what breeds would you recommend for a young girl to work with for 4-H. I live in Louisiana so brahman crosses rule for commercial operations. Thanks

Comments by others are certainly welcome.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
I've dealt with exactly one Texas Longhorn. His horns were 4feet from tip to tip and I had to dehorn him. My muscles still remember the burn from that job--I sawed them off with wire. It was a few years ago...so I'm not the best judge of their temperment. For me, for 4H, you want the child to be competitive and have a quiet animal. Perhaps shorthorn would be a good choice. Simmental (most bloodlines) are also good. Murray Greys are very quiet, but I don't know how well they'd do. Brahman etc cattle don't have any numbers in my area, so I'm not for or against them. The ones I saw at Houston looked good from the side but disappeared from behind...not my kind of cattle at all. I guess I haven't helped at all....sorry! V
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Beefmasters make great show animals. they are extremely gentle.

Brangus are popular in your area if i'm not mistaken?
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
> Beefmasters make great show
> animals. they are extremely
> gentle.

> Brangus are popular in your area
> if i'm not mistaken?

My pick would be a polled Devon,excellent temperament,gentelest cows I have ever owned. I've heard MurryGrays are good to. But that ruby red color and there desire to please,makes my chose Devon.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
I saw some real live Devons at the Calgary Stampede (2000) and really liked what I saw. I like the body shapes...cows were ultra feminine with nice deep bodies... most had that broody triangular body shape and nice shaped udders. I could not find anything to 'not like'. Do they have any faults or problems?

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Mt two cents:

regardless of breed here is a little tool to calm nearly all cattle...

Tailhead stimualtion, also discribed as tender loving care... TLC

Scratch the tailhead and begin from rear to front on the cattle. By the time you get to the head they are tame and ready for halter training. Then teach them to set for the show, wash, comb and feed to perfection, Your quest for a champion animal made easy.

Before buying cattle for show always do a field walk and pick your animals from herds which are not too flighty. Its all in the genes!

My chioce Hereford, Highland, Belgian Blue. Naturally any breed will do if bred for temperment.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
My two cents:

regardless of breed here is a little tool to calm nearly all cattle...

Tailhead stimualtion, also discribed as tender loving care... TLC

Scratch the tailhead and begin from rear to front on the cattle. By the time you get to the head they are tame and ready for halter training. Then teach them to set for the show, wash, comb and feed to perfection, Your quest for a champion animal made easy.

The head,or touching it is considered a threat jester by all cattle. So, do not play with the head! When working the head its time to work, walk and lead. Animals with horns, a person should stay inside the arch of the horns so not to get the POINT!Do not touch the nose, and you should not beat the nose when the animal misbehaves. Rub the Tailhead... Positive reinforcement works best!

Before buying cattle for show always do a field walk and pick your animals from herds which are not too flighty. Its all in the genes!

My chioce Hereford, Highland, Belgian Blue. Naturally any breed will do if bred for temperment.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi! I'm not Vicki...lol. BUT, we raise registered Texas Longhorns! We select our breeding stock from gentle, easily managed lines. Any Longhorn that for some reason (rare) that has a calf that has an "attitude" is Sale Barn material (or next year's freezer beef).

We start bonding with and touching the body of our new calves from day one (unless mother is too over-protective, then we wait a week or so). Holding them, rubbing all over their body, talking to them, positive reinforcement at feeding time, etc. Within a month of age, we start halter training. Put a halter on and let calf drag a lead rope around 24/7. We keep halter training calves in a nice pipe fenced pen with their own loafing shed. Important thing is to use "paired-associate learning"--which is, pairing something pleasurable (food) with talking to them and touching them, rubbing them, etc. By the time they are 6 months old, they are just like puppy dogs...lol.

If a Texas Longhorn is not halter trained by 6 months of age, their horns may cause a problem and they definitely don't like to be handled when they are older. On the other hand, we got a 14 month old Longhorn Bull that now, with 42" horns at 19 months, is a big baby and loves to have his head and neck scratched, rubbed all over, etc. LOT depends on their breeding and genetic temperament in general. When selecting a Longhorn to purchase, if you possibly can, WALK through the herd and observe their disposition. Will tell you a lot about cows, bulls, heifers, AND what they might produce in terms of offspring. Hope this helps some! Bill

[email protected]
 

Latest posts

Top