Qail, Pheasant, Grouse hunters.

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504RP

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Uplandnut !!! Diffinately a bird hunter alright.

Know what you mean Kenny. I would be too if i knew where any were.

The reason i was asking is because someone had dropped a pup off where i work at. There are only a few of us who work at the location the pup was dropped.

None of us needed or let alone wanted it. We all thought eventually it would move on to look for a home.

But that didn't happen. Thought maybe it was too stupid to look for a home. After a couple of weeks one of the guys I work got to feeling sorry for it and bought it a sack of cheap dog food. It was already pretty skinny looking.

The rest of us thought our co worker was going to take it home with him. That he was just too soft hearted to watch that poor pup starve to death.

Problem solved or thought it was until 6 more weeks went by and the co worker bought 2 more sacks of dog food.

The co worker done his best to find it a home. He lived in an apartment complex that didn't allow pets.

So almost 3 months went by. And the pup was looking worse. So one day I loaded it up, hauled it 2 miles down the road where there were houses, other dogs. Thought it would find a good home there.

Went back to the office. About 3 hours latter went to get in my truck and there was that damn dog sitting by my truck wagging its tail.

So we were fixing to have alot of construction work done at that location. We all thought it would for sure get ran over once the construction started.

Was telling my wife this story and she immediately said she wanted the pup to bring it home. Told her we already had a Jack Russell, Blue Heeler, 4 Cats and the last thing we needed was another dog and I wasn't bringing it home.

Wasn't a few days semi trucks started trucking in equipment to start the construction and the few of us that work there got to trying to shame one another into taking the pup.

So i was talking to one of my co workers about how good of a pet it would make for his family and how much his 6 year old kids and wife would enjoy the pup and all. But he said he would like to do that but he had seen a couple of male dogs trying to mate with the pup and thought it might have pups before too much longer. Even though he had just seen that happen.

The thought of it getting run over and it having a litter of pups that it sure didn't need got to bothering me. The more I would think about it. So i told the wife about it. Of course her solution was to bring it home and make a pet out of it. Knew that's what she would say before i mentioned it.

We live in the country but there is a lightly traveled road. Told my wife that we would give it a home on the condition that we let it run loose and it had to be taken to the vet and get spade, all it's Shots and put on this flea and tick pill we have our other dogs on. Wife was more than fine with that. Said she would sit up an appointment with the vet.

I have owned alot of hunting dogs over the years and kept most of them in kennels. That's not a good life for animal. Told the wife that and had rather the dog take a chance of getting ran over than it living out its life in a kennel.

The last bird dog I had named Daisy, spent 4 years of it's life in a kennel until we moved to the country. She was depressed the whole time she was in that kennel. But she lived the remainder or her life running free and died at age 14 happy. Lived free for over 10 years. Used to walk our daughter to and from the bus stop when our daughter was going to school.

A few days latter the wife ask me when we were going to go pick up Lucky. I was watching TV when she ask and didn't know what she was talking about at first. Ask her who was named Lucky ? She laughed and said " The new pup ! "

Said she had been telling the women she works with about the pup and was going to name it Lucky because it was Lucky I liked it !!!

I toldt he wife she was bad wrong about that part. Had I of known the vet bill to spade it, give its shots and buy the flea and tick pills was going to amount to around $ 300 not to mention how much it eats. Old Lucky wouldn't have been as lucky as things turned out for her.

But there might be a rain bow in the sky yet. I use to bird hunt, duck hunt years ago. Trained a couple of bird dogs. I might be wrong but it appears old Lucky might be a Blue Belton English Setter ! I have hunted GPS and a Brittany Spaniel but never a setter. I am thinking about seeing if she knows how to hunt birds.
 
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504RP

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Would be if we still had any birds.
I read something about the sparrow population haveing dissipated by nearly half world wide, can't remember for sure but I think the article mentioned other species of birds also dieing off.

That is something that happens without anyone noticing it really. As a boy I had BB guns and pellet guns and was always shooting sparrows, field larks, starlings, blue jays, got a many of whoopings for shooting Martin's off of my Mother's Martin houses. Got in trouble for shooting Malkin birds and red birds. Don't see Robin migrations anymore.

Duck and goose population has declined alot too. That started happening back in the 70's.

Was talking with Phil Robertson (Duck commander) at a hunting Expo back in the early 90's. His thoughts were because of all the refuges being bilt for water fowl back then were holding the ducks thus causing them not to have to migrate like normal. At that time I thought he was right. But I am not so sure at what is happening to the waterfowl is caused from population decline also

So i can really see a difference in the populations of all of thoes species by comparing now to back then.
 

SBMF 2015

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Back when raccoons were worth trapping, I put a pretty good hurt on them. The pheasants were starting to come back, even had two covies of quail.
Fast forward six years and two polar vortexs. I haven't seen a quail all year and only a handful of pheasants.
 

Silver

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No shortage of migratory game birds up here, and this year for the first time in a long time there are a lot of Ruffed grouse and sharp tailed grouse. I’m not a big fan of the sharpies but the ruffies are as good eating bird as there is.
 
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504RP

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No shortage of migratory game birds up here, and this year for the first time in a long time there are a lot of Ruffed grouse and sharp tailed grouse. I’m not a big fan of the sharpies but the ruffies are as good eating bird as there is.
Do you bird hunt alot ?
 

SmokinM

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Have seen a few quail this year around different farms. We had almost no geese this year which is very odd, usually at least 30 hanging around our pond, havent seen any in months. People that hunt them said the dove numbers were low too.
 
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504RP

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If I remember right the article I read about the decline in bird populations in general were partly due to chemicals that farmers use on crops.

I could see where that would play a big part in population declines. But what makes me wonder about the chemical theory is that I ocassionly will see two or three quail when i am cutting or brush hogging fields that I usually spray from time to time.

We don't have wild pheasants here. 40 years ago we had a fair amount of quail. It wasn't unusual to see big covies of quail. Alot of people quail hunted back then too.

Back then you could hear quail whistling just about anywhere you went during the day. Now when you hear one whistle it is mostly going to be in wooded areas. Seems like they thrive there better for some reason.

It is a mystery to me as to what has happened to their decline. I think since their aren't many people trapping that probably has a little to do with their decline.
 

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One morning last winter when we were out feeding a bunch of pheasants came marching across the field. There was 16 hens and 6 roosters. But not that many around now. We have lots of hawks, raccoons, skunks, foxes, and coyotes. I come across piles of feathers out in the fields where something ate another one.
 
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504RP

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There is a privately owned vacation refuge I guess what you could call it. Located here.

A billionaire bought about 5,000 acres in the foothills. It's wooded with open fields. Built a high fence around it. Put a airport, several nice log houses etc...,

Has a full time crew of people to maintain the property. The property is mountainous has alot of sencic views. Thoes people build black top roads, take care of the wild life they raise there. Have a herd of Elk, was told around 100 head. White tailed deer are all over the place. Last time I was there I saw a herd of 75 maybe 100.
Got black bears

And they have their own hatchery where they hatch out quail, pheasant and other game birds.

They had a auction a couple years ago saleing off some of their equipment etc..., I bought 4 quail brood boxes that they used to transplant quail from the hatchery into the refuge in order to try and make the quail wild.

You can raise several hundred quail per brood house in them. They are designed so that while the quail are still chicks they can go in one half of the brood house like a chicken coop at night to roost. That half also has nipple waters, and feeders, and they can stay out of the rain. The other half of the brood box is a cage so that the chicks can get outside during the day. Hawks and Owls or other predators can't get to them. But the idea is they are exposed to predators at that stage enticing the birds to become wild.

The cage has a small door that can be latched open. So after the baby quail have reached a certain size. Someone can latch the release door open after dark when the quail are roosting.

Supposedly from that point the quail can come and go from the brood house until they strike out on their own.

I plan on using the brood houses to raise quail for the freezer.
 

TennesseeTuxedo

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There is a privately owned vacation refuge I guess what you could call it. Located here.

A billionaire bought about 5,000 acres in the foothills. It's wooded with open fields. Built a high fence around it. Put a airport, several nice log houses etc...,

Has a full time crew of people to maintain the property. The property is mountainous has alot of sencic views. Thoes people build black top roads, take care of the wild life they raise there. Have a herd of Elk, was told around 100 head. White tailed deer are all over the place. Last time I was there I saw a herd of 75 maybe 100.
Got black bears

And they have their own hatchery where they hatch out quail, pheasant and other game birds.

They had a auction a couple years ago saleing off some of their equipment etc..., I bought 4 quail brood boxes that they used to transplant quail from the hatchery into the refuge in order to try and make the quail wild.

You can raise several hundred quail per brood house in them. They are designed so that while the quail are still chicks they can go in one half of the brood house like a chicken coop at night to roost. That half also has nipple waters, and feeders, and they can stay out of the rain. The other half of the brood box is a cage so that the chicks can get outside during the day. Hawks and Owls or other predators can't get to them. But the idea is they are exposed to predators at that stage enticing the birds to become wild.

The cage has a small door that can be latched open. So after the baby quail have reached a certain size. Someone can latch the release door open after dark when the quail are roosting.

Supposedly from that point the quail can come and go from the brood house until they strike out on their own.

I plan on using the brood houses to raise quail for the freezer.
Where is “here”?
 

sim.-ang.king

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If I remember right the article I read about the decline in bird populations in general were partly due to chemicals that farmers use on crops.

I could see where that would play a big part in population declines. But what makes me wonder about the chemical theory is that I ocassionly will see two or three quail when i am cutting or brush hogging fields that I usually spray from time to time.

We don't have wild pheasants here. 40 years ago we had a fair amount of quail. It wasn't unusual to see big covies of quail. Alot of people quail hunted back then too.

Back then you could hear quail whistling just about anywhere you went during the day. Now when you hear one whistle it is mostly going to be in wooded areas. Seems like they thrive there better for some reason.

It is a mystery to me as to what has happened to their decline. I think since their aren't many people trapping that probably has a little to do with their decline.
Three things cause quail numbers to decline.
Better herbicides killing weeds the quails like, (foxtail, honeysuckle, native grasses,etc..)
The invention of the brush hog.
The lack of varmint hunters, including killing skunks, cats, and other egg eaters.
Get rid of those three things and the quail population will slowly return.
 

J Hoy

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If I remember right the article I read about the decline in bird populations in general were partly due to chemicals that farmers use on crops.

I could see where that would play a big part in population declines. But what makes me wonder about the chemical theory is that I ocassionly will see two or three quail when i am cutting or brush hogging fields that I usually spray from time to time.

We don't have wild pheasants here. 40 years ago we had a fair amount of quail. It wasn't unusual to see big covies of quail. Alot of people quail hunted back then too.

Back then you could hear quail whistling just about anywhere you went during the day. Now when you hear one whistle it is mostly going to be in wooded areas. Seems like they thrive there better for some reason.

It is a mystery to me as to what has happened to their decline. I think since their aren't many people trapping that probably has a little to do with their decline.
I assume you are blaming the raccoons, etc. for the decline in game birds, like quail. Long before people came to the Americas and began killing small predators (not to mention birds) in huge numbers, the birds and predators were doing just fine together.

The decline in all birds is primarily due to the declines in the small insects that the hatchlings eat, if they hatch, and failure of the eggs to hatch. The pesticides that are killing the insects at an alarming rate, including pollinators which we people need to pollinate our food plants, are also causing game bird (and other bird's eggs) not to hatch and if they do, the hatchlings can't find enough small insects to survive. The lack of insects is also causing migratory song birds to die of starvation. The birds get a double whammy, not enough insects, especially for their young ones and one seed coated with one of the most deadly insecticides, Imidacloprid, causes a song bird to either die soon after eating it or have their brain affected so they get lost, especially during migration, usually resulting in death. In the U.S., the insects have declined by about 65% in the last 50 years and the birds have declined by slightly more.

The same insecticide that kills the birds, Imidacloprid, was found to cause underdeveloped facial bones and reproductive malformations on white-tailed deer that were deliberately exposed. I doubt that it is a coincidence that cattle, goats, sheep and bison, llama and other camelids, horses and other equines, dog, cats and newborn children all began having the same birth defects. And that it was in the same year as the white-tailed deer and other wild grazing animals began being born with those birth defects. Imidacloprid was registered for use in 1994 and was quite widely used that year, especially in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Texas and Florida. The birth defects on mammals, reptiles and birds began in spring of 1995 and became more prevalent as more neonicotinoids like Imidacloprid were used.

You all should type an animal like "domestic goats underbite images" on Google and see all the photos of goats with underbite. Do the same with domestic calves underbite images and lots of photos of calves with underbite are shown. Same with horse foals or other domestic animals, dogs, cats. Or try children underbite images. I taught grade school in the 1970s and there were no children with underbite, autism, missing limbs, etc. in any of the classes in the schools where I taught. Those birth defects became common in newborn children beginning in 1995, but no one seems to care about the children and no one will do anything about the birth defects on the domestic animals. Livestock owners don't seem to care if their animals are born with underbite or overbite or weird looking male genitalia, so the toxins responsible keep being used.
 

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