Prolapsed Uterus = Dead Cow

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Anonymous

The title says most of it. She delivered and then the uterus prolapsed, all, a good three feet worth. She was a bit wild being both new to me and to the pasture and would not be penned (we were careful not to run her), so then it took about an hour and a half to maybe 2 hours to get a tranq Rifle. Got her sedated, the vet came and put her innerds back in, and sewed her up. She got up and was up, and sometimes laying down and then back up. Checked her at 4:45 and she was up and walking. At 6:00 pm she was dead.

Bull calf was a good sized one (however it should not have been too large for her to calve), and strong and healthy as can be. Unfortunately though the Angus was supposed to be bread to an Angus Bull, the calf is definately a White faced Golden Champagne colored Charloais.

So much for Auction House sales banter.....It's been a long day and I have a bunch more in late third trimester.



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A

Anonymous

The only cow we have ever lost calfing was a baldy bred to a charolais. She was supposed to be bred to an angus. Our scenerio was the same as yours. Condolences.

dunmovin farms

> The title says most of it. She
> delivered and then the uterus
> prolapsed, all, a good three feet
> worth. She was a bit wild being
> both new to me and to the pasture
> and would not be penned (we were
> careful not to run her), so then
> it took about an hour and a half
> to maybe 2 hours to get a tranq
> Rifle. Got her sedated, the vet
> came and put her innerds back in,
> and sewed her up. She got up and
> was up, and sometimes laying down
> and then back up. Checked her at
> 4:45 and she was up and walking.
> At 6:00 pm she was dead.

> Bull calf was a good sized one
> (however it should not have been
> too large for her to calve), and
> strong and healthy as can be.
> Unfortunately though the Angus was
> supposed to be bread to an Angus
> Bull, the calf is definately a
> White faced Golden Champagne
> colored Charloais.

> So much for Auction House sales
> banter.....It's been a long day
> and I have a bunch more in late
> third trimester.
 
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A

Anonymous

I have two ideas here. Frankly, most of the prolapses that die in this area are low in selenium. Supplementation with a preventative level will help if the animals are low, but would be toxic if they're high levels. Depending on what is usual for the area they were purchased from, supplementation may help. My second thought is that they die when the uterine artery is ruptured--ie full length out, uterine horn tips exposed. If she was like that by the time she was worked on, there was nothing you could do--she was going to die. You didn't say if she had a hard calving. If it wasn't, seriously examine selenium deficiency as a cause. Good Luck V
 
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A

Anonymous

<A HREF="https://wsm.ezsitedesigner.com/share/scrapbook/15/154322/calf.JPG" TARGET="_blank">https://wsm.ezsitedesigner.com/share/scrapbook/15/154322/calf.JPG</A>

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