production costs

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Dras

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I am interested in finding out how much more it costs to operate a seedstock herd vs. a commercial cattle herd on a per cow basis. If some one has some information or knows where I can get some, I would really appreciate it. Thanks
 

PATB

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Dad and I run both. The biggest difference is cost of AI certificates and the registration. There is the money spent on advertising and marketing of the catttle. We also sent in data to the Angus Herd Improvement Records that also adds additional cost. The initial cost of the animals will most likely be higher for registered cattle or high quality seedstock. Our actual feed and houseing cost are the same. The commercial and registered herd are treated exactly the same.
 

Running Arrow Bill

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Dras":q7rv72kf said:
I am interested in finding out how much more it costs to operate a seedstock herd vs. a commercial cattle herd on a per cow basis. If some one has some information or knows where I can get some, I would really appreciate it. Thanks

We run a seedstock herd of registered Longhorns. Considering "food", vet costs, vaccinations, de-worming, etc., one 1000# animal unit (any breed) probably costs the same on average as any other animal unit. Our registration costs are minimal...$15. per head. We keep detailed records on each animal for all production costs, measurements, etc. And, for any given month I know (probably +/- 5%) how much the to date tab is for each animal since we've owned it. Also use this data to predict how much hay, feed, etc., we need for the upcoming year. As such, we know the approximate "break-even" point for each animal at any point in time. We can also take our indirect overhead costs and apportion that to each 1000# animal unit (or portion thereof).

If you know your costs, then you can make a decision to sell, trade, keep, or eat the animal.
 
A

Anonymous

la4angus jr.":2kvo1i9l said:
Angus is the best.

Now there's an intelligent, fact-filled response.

Ok, listen up guys. The angus breeders on this board are starting to sound like the longhorn breeders used to sound. While angus cattle are a good breed and have their purpose in the industry, they are not the end-all solution to everything. I will not dispute the fact that angus are known for their marbling ability but the fact remains that other breeds can marble and grade prime as well. I also believe as you do that marbling equates taste but it does not necessarily equate tenderness. As we have seen, others will disagree about what tastes good which brings me to my main point. Not everyone wants to purchase prime beef. Some people (myself not included) prefer the lean cuts because of taste. Others prefer not to buy prime or CAB because of the price which brings me to another point. You sound as if everyone should raise purebred angus cattle. If everyone did (and they all qualified for CAB), the supply would exceed the demand which would bring down the prices which would then hurt your bottom line. Why not be satisfied that others don't agree with you and be happy with your premiums? Also, when talking about purebred cattle, the only reason anyone should be raising purebred cattle should be for seedstock.

So please stop the "angus is best" response to every post because while angus may be best for you they're not best for everyone and if they were, they might not be for you any more.
 

cherokeeruby

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No one here has actually revealed what it cost to keep a cow. Or various breeds.

First I am assuming that the cow in question is being raised as inexpensively as possible. Not for show but just to breed back and produce calves every year.

A lot also depends on where you live, here in Texas we have to feed hay for a little less than 3 months. Our cows average 2 round bales per head. Since we grown our own hay the only cost is fertilizer and cutting and baling cost. Varies each year depending on rainfall and haven't figured it recently but guessiing around $25 per bale. So that is 2 bales per cow or $50 per cow. We also buy trace mineral salt blocks, not very often, don't know how much each cow consumes. So I will throw in $5 for salt. OK, eartags for flies, not here, don't use them. Let the egrets eat the flys. OK, tick control, no cost, brahmans don't have tick problems. Let's see, what else goes into keeping a cow. Hoof trimming, don't think so, that is what rocks are for. Oh yeah, the vet, ok they go when they are weaned heifers to be dehorned, branded, bangs shot. But that is a one time cost so can't really factor it over the life of the cow.
Ok, another $5 per head per year for vet. Palpation is a good idea. Maybe another $5 per year. Don't do it every year. Get rid of the ones that don't perform.

My cost to keep a cow per year breaks down to:

Feed .......$50
Salt........ $5
Vet......... $5
Pg check.. $5

Looks like total is $65, sounds to low so I will say $100 per year per head.

Hope this helps
 

dd

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What about pasture cost, bull or semen costs, replacement heifer costs to name a few ?
 

cherokeeruby

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Land has been in the family since the great depression. there is property tax, get an ag exemption. That could add maybe $20 per head.

Purchased Hereford bull, but will be able to recoop cost when we are through with him. But we do have to feed him so his cost would spread out amoung the cows. Hmmmmmmmmmmm. I bull divided by 40 cows? Be generous and say $10 per cow. The Brahman bull we raised, so just cost what it cost to keep an animal Don't buy replacement heifers, raise those too.

There are just too many factors to say what it cost to keep a cow.

Factoring in keeping a bull, raising heifers, land costs, the most I can come up with is $200 per producing cow per year.

We control the cost which we have control over. Feeding, vet, nutrition, and health.


dd":1ovha186 said:
What about pasture cost, bull or semen costs, replacement heifer costs to name a few ?
 

dd

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Right you are. Well put, well said. Its those little costs we sometimes forget about that sometimes surprise us when figuring everything on a per cow basis. Property tax was a good example. Just to add some others: Insurance, repairs, equipment and labor.
 

txag

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dd":8uee2f13 said:
Right you are. Well put, well said. Its those little costs we sometimes forget about that sometimes surprise us when figuring everything on a per cow basis. Property tax was a good example. Just to add some others: Insurance, repairs, equipment and labor.

& for the registered folks: semen, certificates, registrations, performance data, advertising
 
A

Anonymous

Anonymous":23ckj82v said:
la4angus jr.":23ckj82v said:
Angus is the best.

Now there's an intelligent, fact-filled response.

Ok, listen up guys. The angus breeders on this board are starting to sound like the longhorn breeders used to sound. While angus cattle are a good breed and have their purpose in the industry, they are not the end-all solution to everything. I will not dispute the fact that angus are known for their marbling ability but the fact remains that other breeds can marble and grade prime as well. I also believe as you do that marbling equates taste but it does not necessarily equate tenderness. As we have seen, others will disagree about what tastes good which brings me to my main point. Not everyone wants to purchase prime beef. Some people (myself not included) prefer the lean cuts because of taste. Others prefer not to buy prime or CAB because of the price which brings me to another point. You sound as if everyone should raise purebred angus cattle. If everyone did (and they all qualified for CAB), the supply would exceed the demand which would bring down the prices which would then hurt your bottom line. Why not be satisfied that others don't agree with you and be happy with your premiums? Also, when talking about purebred cattle, the only reason anyone should be raising purebred cattle should be for seedstock.

So please stop the "angus is best" response to every post because while angus may be best for you they're not best for everyone and if they were, they might not be for you any more.
la4angusjr is signed in as an anomyous guest. That is not me. I have no idea who he or she is. Just want to set the record straaight.
 

la4angus

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the last post about la4angus jr was mine. I just didn't sign in.
I think that a person should be registered to post on this board.
What are some other thoughts.
 
A

Anonymous

I don't know if this would also apply, but what about cost such as fuel for your tractor or truck to feed, fertilizer and weed spray for pastures. I know they don't go into the cow themselves but are sure expenses that exisist because of the cows.
 

txag

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JPO":1a9wgyzb said:
I don't know if this would also apply, but what about cost such as fuel for your tractor or truck to feed, fertilizer and weed spray for pastures. I know they don't go into the cow themselves but are sure expenses that exisist because of the cows.

i would think so. those are all things i turn in to the accountant.
 

Frankie

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Dras":2q75j3j3 said:
I am interested in finding out how much more it costs to operate a seedstock herd vs. a commercial cattle herd on a per cow basis. If some one has some information or knows where I can get some, I would really appreciate it. Thanks

Here are a couple of links on cost to keep a cow:

"http://www.vermeerag.com/onFarm/artcl_OTFcowcost.html

"In the most recent summary released (1999), the average annual cost to keep a cow was $412.71. The top 25% of producers (those making the most money) had an annual cow cost of $334.76, while the bottom 25% had a cost of $545.28. The top 25% had a return to capital, labor and management per cow of $95.57, while the lower end lost $194.78 per cow. "

And this one from Texas A&M:

http://agecoext.tamu.edu/spa/analysis_f ... lysis1.pdf

I can't copy it, but it says to be cost competitive, producers must keep production costs under $350….

To those costs, you would need to add registration fees, AI certificates if you use AI, association memberships, travel to sales, advertising. On the other hand, though it's harder work, we make more money selling registered Angus than we could with the same number of commercial cattle.
 
A

Anonymous

frankie,

i run cross bred cattle, but have considered now for a couple of years going with a registered breed. which breed, i have not decided.

you made the comment, that you have been able to make more money with the registered cattle.

in your opinion, what is the smallest herd size that you would recommend in the registered cattle and be able to be profitable? just wondering from some others expericence with this. i dont know if you started off big or small into it, but would appreciate any advice you could give.

in the beginning, at least, AIing might not be a possibility.

the commments of others welcomed too.

and if i may, since you said you have angus, how good is the "new design" bull?

thanks

jt
 
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