Preventing Hoof Rot

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Johnnybar

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I give my local vet enough business that a phone call for advice is never unwelcome. He will know what works best for the conditions you are dealing with. If not, find another vet.
 

kenny thomas

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Ok thank you. I’m reading the bottle now and it is saying 3ml per 100lbs of body weight either IM or Sub-Q. I’ve only administered LA200 one other time to a sick calf with pneumonia issues. I do not remember if I gave IM or sub Q. Suggestions? I do however remember giving two injections, one on either side of neck because it was a large dose for one area.
Give SQ in the neck area so no meat is damaged. And no more than 10cc per site.
 

TCRanch

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Ok thank you. I’m reading the bottle now and it is saying 3ml per 100lbs of body weight either IM or Sub-Q. I’ve only administered LA200 one other time to a sick calf with pneumonia issues. I do not remember if I gave IM or sub Q. Suggestions? I do however remember giving two injections, one on either side of neck because it was a large dose for one area.
Per drugs.com:

Liquamycin LA-200 can also be administered by subcutaneous or intravenous injection at a level of 3-5 mg of oxytetracycline per lb of body weight per day. In the treatment of severe foot rot and advanced cases of other indicated diseases, a dosage level of 5 mg/lb of body weight per day is recommended. Treatment should be continued 24-48 hours following remission of disease signs; however, not to exceed a total of 4 consecutive days. Consult your veterinarian if improvement is not noted within 24-48 hours of the beginning of treatment.

Personally, with foot rot, I tend to err on the side of "severe" and administer 5cc per 100 lbs, 10cc max per injection site, SQ.
 

WFfarm

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We have good luck with the mineral tubs that sit on the ground and have the rubber flap on top. We also use the Purina Wind&Rain so it doesn't clump up if some rain or snow does get in.
 
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I give my local vet enough business that a phone call for advice is never unwelcome. He will know what works best for the conditions you are dealing with. If not, find another vet.
I have been in contact with my vet thankfully because I too give her lots of business lol! She has been very helpful but I also like this site and all of the information that I learn on here is tremendous.
 

WFfarm

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About 2/3 the times we put one in the chute for a limp, it turns out to be something other than hoof rot. A cut between the claws, a small rock imbedded in the bottom of the hoof, or just a sprain. Sometime you don't figure out what it was. LA200 or 300 is the best for hoofrot or any other infection or abscess they get in the hoof. Years ago my dad would soak the foot in a solution of warm water and Epson salt. It was fun as a kid trying to hold a bucket of water with a hoof in and not get soaked, stopped on, or kicked.
 

TCRanch

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And something for future reference - LA200/300 is super for foot rot or pinkeye - but it is NOT generally used for pneumonia.
Bears repeating! Definitely need something specifically for respiratory - not a broad spectrum oxytetracycline.

Side note: LA is generally the go-to for anaplasmosis.
 
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ksmit454

ksmit454

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Buck Randall

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About 2/3 the times we put one in the chute for a limp, it turns out to be something other than hoof rot. A cut between the claws, a small rock imbedded in the bottom of the hoof, or just a sprain. Sometime you don't figure out what it was. LA200 or 300 is the best for hoofrot or any other infection or abscess they get in the hoof. Years ago my dad would soak the foot in a solution of warm water and Epson salt. It was fun as a kid trying to hold a bucket of water with a hoof in and not get soaked, stopped on, or kicked.
Antibiotics are important for footrot treatment, but shouldn't be used for hoof abscesses. The drug doesn't get into the abscess anyway. Foot abscesses need to be pared out and left to drain. They will eventually open and drain on their own in most cases, giving the illusion that the antibiotic treatment "worked".
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Here’s a cheap and effective way to feed loose mineral.
Yup - works great. Dun used to have all the instructions to make one posted on here. Short story: years ago I went to Hudson Pines Farm, a purebred Simmental farm owned by "the" David Rockefeller. I was totally amazed to see these plastic 50 gal drums all over the farm in the pastures and paddocks. I checked them out and made my own. Dun was looking for a mineral feeder, so I told him about these barrels and how to make them.
I put a swivel eye bolt on the top of the barrel, offset towards the back, so the barrel tips down on the "hole" side. Helps keep any rain out of the barrel.
 

Lucky_P

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Those red/brown trace mineral salt blocks contain so much Iron Oxide - added as a colorizer and to meet the Iron 'analysis' - that they actually make copper deficiency worse... cattle can't readily absorb or utilize Iron in the oxide form, but it will block intestinal absorption sites for copper.

I'm a dinosaur... Draxxin, Nuflor, etc., were not on the market when I was in practice. Clean-up the lesion, squirt some Cop-R-Tox in it, give 'em a big dose of LA-200 and appropriate number of Sustain III sulfa boluses, and it put most footrot cases right in short order.
 
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Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Those red/brown trace mineral salt blocks contain so much Iron Oxide - added as a colorizer and to meet the Iron 'analysis' - that they actually make copper deficiency worse... cattle can't readily absorb or utilize Iron in the oxide form, but it will block intestinal absorption sites for copper.

I'm a dinosaur... Draxxin, Nuflor, etc., were not on the market when I was in practice. Clean-up the lesion, squirt some Cop-R-Tox in it, give 'em a big dose of LA-200 and appropriate number of Sustain III sulfa boluses, and it put most footrot cases right in short order.
This is exactly what I do - I am definitely a dinosaur!!!! I have never had to repeat a treatment.
 

Silver

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I usually find my foot rot cases miles from home in the bush, so they get shot with a medi-dart arrow of LA. Twice if I can get close enough the second time. Usually within a day they start getting better.
 
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ksmit454

ksmit454

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These are the two loose salts available in my area that I have found to be highest in Iodine. Thoughts on which one you would go with?
 

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