Pregnancy

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Anonymous

Well my 21 month old hiefer is 1 and a half months away from her due date. What can I do to make everything go as smoothly as possible? What sould I have on hand when labor starts? What are some signs that she is having a problem? Thank you

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Anonymous

If you have one of the breeds that calves real easy, probably need to do nothing except make sure she has enough to eat in 3rd trimester, has been vaccinated and de-wormed. Also, if the weather is real nasty, have a loafing shed for her to get under. With our Texas Longhorns, they calve extremely easy and have a 99.7% unassisted calving record based on university research. When she gets real close to calving, bags up, and gets a little nervous, probably don't get too close, keep an eye on her from a distance, and let Nature take its course.
 
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Anonymous

It all depends on the bull and the size of your heifer. We A.I.ed all of our heifers this last year so we could sleep a little bit easier. Well our neighbors bull hopped the fence and overrode some of the A.I. semen. Our neighbor had to pull 3 of his calves with a truck and lost the other 4 heifers of his because he didn't get there in time. We had two problems with "our" cleanup bull. All I can tell you is wait it out you should know if it's time to step in.

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Anonymous

Have a headcatch, OB Chain, Calf puller. The heifer will have the water out first, if after 1 hour the water bag doesn't break and feet aren't present you should arm her and identify the problem, if the top of the hooves are pointed down, the calf is backwards and you will have to pull it, if it's to big you will need to have it c sectioned. If there is only one leg present it has a leg back, in this case you will have to push the calf back into the cow and pull the leg up. A head could also be back and the calf will need to be pushed back in and the head freed. Heifers should not be given more than 3 hours without assistance after the water bag is present and she is not progressing. Some will tell you to wait longer but they usually are the ones that "let nature take it's course".

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Anonymous

The writer mentioned to make sure the cow was dewormed. Is it safe to deworm with Ivomectin pour one in the 3 trimester? I use it in the fall, but am afraid to use it in the spring, because the cows are due in June. I didn't deworm while the calves are sucking, because I wasn't sure of the transfer. Is it okey to use this product while pregnant and while lactating? Jimmie

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Anonymous

Yes, it is safe to deworm in the third trimester. Your cow will come through calving and return to breeding condition faster and better as well. We have, on occasion, dewormed days before calving. The vet said it's ok and better to do it than to wait.

> The writer mentioned to make sure
> the cow was dewormed. Is it safe
> to deworm with Ivomectin pour one
> in the 3 trimester? I use it in
> the fall, but am afraid to use it
> in the spring, because the cows
> are due in June. I didn't deworm
> while the calves are sucking,
> because I wasn't sure of the
> transfer. Is it okey to use this
> product while pregnant and while
> lactating? Jimmie
 
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Anonymous

Things to keep on hand for a post partum First Aid Kit

Lube/Shoulder length palpation sleves OB Chains/Nylon straps with D ring (need to be able to sterilize these) Calf Puller or come along with extra lengh of chain to afix to post/tree etc. NOT A TRUCK Oral calf feeder and or bottle with new nipple Dry Colostrum Supliment/ Imuteck IGG/ Colotrix etc. oral CMPK/ Calcium Gel (for Cow) and gun for administration Tincture of Iodine & small cup to dip navel of calf/ prevents navel abscese/ helps dry cord faster.

Heifer/Cow will passs a thick mucus plug first, this is the cervical plug that protects the preganancy from the outside world. Then the Amniotic sack will pass, this is a medium sized fluid filled sack attached to the placenta, it will be follewed tipicly by the front feet if the calf is in the normal posture and position. A normal delivery takes about 30 minutes or less, but a heifer with her first delivery may take longer.

Sometimes, depending on the size of the female, shape of her pelvic canal it may take longer, especialy if the cervix has not fully dilated. If you are able to observe her, you will ssee her avoid the herd and go off by herself, this is a good indication she is in labor. They don't all stop eating, as many text books will indicate/ (I have several that much right through labor), OK, then she may get up and down several times to reposition the calf and help it move into the birth canal, you should see toes, the calf should be in a diving posture with the front legs offset, one forward of the other, then after a few inches of front legs and toes, you should see a toung then the nose, after the shoulders pop through the head will come out rather quickly followed by the rest of the calf. In the event you need to pull on the calf, it is best for the cow to have her down on her side, and pull the calf at a 45 degree angle downward motion from the cows vulva, if she is standing getting a 45+ downward pull is a lot easier, but you want to pull on the long leg then the short in separet pulls, trying to losen the shoulder, don't pull them at the same time as this may cause hip lock, which can damage both the calf and the cow, causing temporary or even permanent nerve damage.

Once calf is out it is critical to clear the nasal passage, grass or straw stuck up the nostril works well to initiate a sneeze.

Nature is best to handle calving, the cow's natural ability to calve and nurture her calf kick in and she should be able to do it all her self, but in the event she can't or won't all the above listed items will help insure you are able to bring her and the calf through it easily, remember, a first aid kit is for emergency only, use patience when observing a female in labor, after 2 hours of watching her try it is time to help, even that seems too long, but if she is trying that is better than forcing the calf out.



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