Preferred weed spray?

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sstterry

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I have seen pastures treated with chaparral for years and was not impressed. It may be some thing they were doing in their application bit it did nothing for any thing other than the easy to kill weeds. I can kill huisatche, mesquite, youpon, etc with with annual treatment of GNHL.

Are yall saying 24D is not restricted? I have to have an applicators license to purchase GNHL.
Neither variation of 2-4D is restricted in TN. I am pretty sure that dicamba is though. (I looked and you need a licence to spray dicamba in TN)
 

callmefence

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I have seen pastures treated with chaparral for years and was not impressed. It may be some thing they were doing in their application bit it did nothing for any thing other than the easy to kill weeds. I can kill huisatche, mesquite, youpon, etc with with annual treatment of GNHL.

Are yall saying 24D is not restricted? I have to have an applicators license to purchase GNHL.
No you don't...
 

BFE

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I only spray 2-4D or Crossbow if I have a major ironweed and/or thistle problem, cows eat most everything else. I am in fescue country though, so not necessarily the same problems as you all.
 

simme

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Herbicide restrictions vary by state. In my state, Grazon P+D requires an applicators license, but 2,4-D and Weedmaster (with dicamba) and GrazonNext do not. Some states have different rules/restrictions for 2,4-D and dicamba.
 

Brute 23

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No you don't...
Where do you buy your Grazon Next HL at with out the license?

We have 5 local places and not one will sell it to me with out the applicators license. I asked after reading it here that it was not required. I just bought some.

I was looking for a number on who regulates it to call to confirm but it would really surprise me that all of them are wrong.

Does some one have a number on who to call for Texas I will gladly call Monday?

That is the main reason we keep our applicators licenses. If it's not needed I will drop it in a heartbeat.
 

Brute 23

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I see where you can buy premixes or maybe amounts less than 1g or stuff like that for lawn purposes but not walking in and buying 100g concentrated to spray pasture.
 

kenny thomas

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Where do you buy your Grazon Next HL at with out the license?

We have 5 local places and not one will sell it to me with out the applicators license. I asked after reading it here that it was not required. I just bought some.

I was looking for a number on who regulates it to call to confirm but it would really surprise me that all of them are wrong.

Does some one have a number on who to call for Texas I will gladly call Monday?

That is the main reason we keep our applicators licenses. If it's not needed I will drop it in a heartbeat.
It is restricted in almost every state except for the northeast. Like from New York to Maine its not restricted
 

simme

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This site says that GrazonNext is available only to licensed applicators in Louisiana, Texas and New Mexico. Not available at all in AK, CT, DE, DC, MA, MD, ME, NH, NJ, NY, RI, VT. Available to anyone in the other states.


Note that the price shown is very high. But this website always has extensive information on their products.
 

cjhames

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The real question is "Why spray weeds?"
1) Spraying weeds annually becomes a habit because the weeds keep coming back
2) Most weed can not only be grazed, they are often more nutritious than your grass
3) Herbicides also affect soil biology negatively, which sets the conditions for more weeds.
4) Many weeds are pollinators which bees, butterflies and other insects need for food...which affects the birds and reptiles which also feed on those insects.

My thoughts exactly. Noxious or uneatable weeds are usually the byproduct of poor soils. For what it’s worth, we’ve gone to strip grazing and the results have been staggering. No longer fertilizing. No more weed problems. Cattle love it. Chickens love it. Birds and bees and butterflies are happy. Mamas happy. What more could a man want?
 

bird dog

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There is a lot of confusion on the GrazonNext restriction issue in Texas. This might help.

My recommendation is to take the time to get your license. Its a simple process and you might actually learn a few things. They have made it a lot easier to renew the license. You no longer have to repeat the boring classes to get so many hours of training to renew. Your pesticide license will help you out if you ever get into a drift situation where damage is done to a neighbors crop so I don't think it would be wise to let it expire even though there are plenty of non-restricted products currently available.

Corteva (Dow) has a habit of introducing new products that are the next best thing when their patent is expiring on their old products. Of course the new chemical will be more expensive. There is no argument that their products are fantastic but for myself, I just got tired of the higher prices every year so looked for an alternative. That led me to the generic Dicamba 2 4 D mix products. I paid $23.51 per gallon this year for Brash from a Co-op. This puts my chemical plus surfactant costs at less than $5 per acre.

If you really have some problems in a field like I did last year with some spiny astor, combine the Brash with cimmarron plus or one of its generics like Patriot. I have been spraying for a long time but this mix amazed me on what it accomplished on a mixed grass bottom land pasture.

The brash can also be used on your Johnson grass, sudan, sorghum fields.
 

greybeard

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Are yall saying 24D is not restricted? I have to have an applicators license to purchase GNHL.
Unless it's changed, 2,4d is restricted in Texas unless you buy it in qt bottles. You can buy 100 qt bottles without applicator's lic but can't buy it in a 1 gal or 2 1/2 gal jug. That's why most places won't sell GrazonNextHL to people without an Applicator's lic.
 

greybeard

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Further explanation from Amazon Q&A:

Question:
I understand that this product is a restricted use pesticide in Texas and a private applicator license is needed to purchase this???
Answer:
There are no licenses needed for application of Grazon in Texas according to the Manufacturers label. However, there are specific counties in Texas that have application restrictions for herbicides containing 2,4-D. Amazon could not restrict sales in only those counties effected, so Amazon restricted Grazon sales to the entire state. You can contact ProSolutions through our Amazon Storefront for more specific information.

Current States with some form of 2, 4-d Restrictions: AR, CO, LA, MA, ME, TX. There may be other States that have specific municipality restrictions that are not listed. Please check with your local Ag extension office for more information. see less
default._CR0,0,1024,1024_SX48_.png

ProSolutions LLC
Seller · September 11, 2019

It IS confusing:

gnhl2.jpg
 

greybeard

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From the Texas Agriculture dot Gov website I linked to above:

Regulated Herbicides​

Regulated Herbicides are designated by the department. If used as directed or in accordance with widespread and commonly recognized practice, these herbicides require additional restrictions to prevent a hazard to desirable vegetation caused by drift or an uncontrolled application.

Restrictions on applications of Regulated Herbicides are only applicable in Regulated Herbicide Counties.


List of Regulated Herbicides:

• 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); including acid, amine, choline, ester and salt formulations;
• 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA);
• 3,6-dichloro-o-anisic acid (dicamba); including dimethylamine salt (DMA), sodium salt, diglycoamine salt (DGA), isopropylamine salts (IPA), N, N-Bis-(3-aminopropyl) methylamine (BAPMA), and potassium salt; and
• 3,7-dichloro-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinclorac).


Exemptions from Regulated Herbicide Classification

A pesticide product containing an active ingredient listed above is exempt from classification as a regulated herbicide if the product:
• is distributed in a container with a capacity less than or equal to one quart for liquid products or less than or equal to two pounds for dry or solid products
• is a specialty fertilizer mixture labeled for ornamental use and registered as a commercial fertilizer under Chapter 63 of the Agriculture Code
• is ready for use, requires no further mixing or dilution before use, and is packaged in a container of one gallon or less for liquid products or four pounds or less for dry or solid products.


gnhl3.jpg
 

greybeard

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If you can teach a cow to eat thistle let me know . That’s why I spray my pasture!
From what little I know about that, the usual way to 'teach' them is to mob intensive graze, where there is so much competition for graze that they have to eat the thistle because there isn't enough normal forage to support all of them. Do it often enough and eventually all of them will (maybe) 'learn' out of necessity to eat the thistle or other normally unpalatable plant life. Will probably work better in regions where there is less rainfall or in drought conditions.
 

SBMF 2015

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I have seen pastures treated with chaparral for years and was not impressed. It may be some thing they were doing in their application bit it did nothing for any thing other than the easy to kill weeds. I can kill huisatche, mesquite, youpon, etc with with annual treatment of GNHL.

Are yall saying 24D is not restricted? I have to have an applicators license to purchase GNHL.
Must be state by state. I go to my local Co-op and get GNHL, No license.
 

callmefence

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Unless it's changed, 2,4d is restricted in Texas unless you buy it in qt bottles. You can buy 100 qt bottles without applicator's lic but can't buy it in a 1 gal or 2 1/2 gal jug. That's why most places won't sell GrazonNextHL to people without an Applicator's lic.
That's exactly right. The only reason you can't buy hl in Texas without a license is that it doesn't come in quart container's and contains 24d You do not need a license to use it anymore than you need one to use 24d. You just have to purchase it "out of state"...
 

greybeard

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True (probably), as long as you follow all the rest of the regs on the specimen label and the regs on the Supplemental label.

I do wish it could be bought in large containers without an app lic as I let mine lapse but hopefully I soon won't have to deal with such things. From everything I've read GNHL works as good or better than Remedy for most broadleaf and brush here, is cheaper per volume to purchase, and requires less herbicide per acre.
 

coachg

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From what little I know about that, the usual way to 'teach' them is to mob intensive graze, where there is so much give for graze that they have to eat the thistle because there isn't enough normal forage to support all of them. Do it often enough and eventually all of them will (maybe) 'learn' out of necessity to eat the thistle or other normally unpalatable plant life. Will probably work better in regions where there is less rainfall or in drought conditions.
We get a good bit 50-60 inches a year in Alabama, last two probably more . We bought a farm that had been neglected for a few years . On going battle with thistle . Don’t know about your thistle but we a couple different variations it seems . Can’t do intense rotation grazing because of water sources but even if we could I don’t think my cows would touch it ! Even when the pasture is short and it’s in the rosette stage they give it a wide birth . A shovel and 24D or Grazon is the only way I can semi control it . Neighbor doesn’t do squat . I have even spot sprayed parts of theirs !
 
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