Please verify my feed schedule

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Anonymous

Hey everyone. I just wanted to verify my feed schedule should be correct for where I am at on the 2 steers I have.
They both are on 4 acres of decent to very good pasture. Right now they are at 850 lbs or so and 14 months old.
They get 6 lbs 13% grain each in the morning, and the same in the evening. I would like to finish them at 1200 lbs or so, and would like to take them in the next 3 months. Sound about right to you experts?

On edit, one steer is Gertrudis/angus mix and the other is Brangus
 

terra8186

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Sound about right to you experts?

I am not an expert and everybody has their opinions on what the best way to finish is. It looks like you are feeding 1.5% of their body weight in grain and I am assuming they are picking up the rest of what they need from the pasture. I have been told that after 750 lbs they don't need that high (13%) of protein. You could probably save some money by lowering the protein level.

I feed mine a similar way at this time of year and they feed out just fine. In the winter they are on mostly grain, because it is the cheapest feed source for me.

Good Luck
 

edrsimms

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hooknline":3m8klbnn said:
Hey everyone. I just wanted to verify my feed schedule should be correct for where I am at on the 2 steers I have.
They both are on 4 acres of decent to very good pasture. Right now they are at 850 lbs or so and 14 months old.
They get 6 lbs 13% grain each in the morning, and the same in the evening. I would like to finish them at 1200 lbs or so, and would like to take them in the next 3 months. Sound about right to you experts?

On edit, one steer is Gertrudis/angus mix and the other is Brangus
If you are trying to finish them in the next 3 months you wont do it on your feed schedule. You are currently feeding them 12 lbs of feed for a total of 1.56 lbs of Total protein --- not good enough.
Usually feed conversion rates for cattle are 6:1 (6 lbs of feed per pound of gain.
You need to be feeding about 2.0 lbs of Total Protein per day which is .13 x 17 lbs x .90 = 1.99
One more thing --- to keep the rumen active they need a form of roughage at least 20% of their total feed intake per day.
880 lb steer x 3% = 26.5 total intake per day
17 lbs of your 13% ration + the remaining in roughage per day (month 1)
18 lbs of your 13% ration + the remaining in roughage per day (month 2)
18.5 lbs of your 13% ration + the remaining in roughage per day (month 3)
This will give your steers 3.0+ lbs of gain per day over the next 100 days = 300lbs + 880lbs = 1180+
I doubt feed conversions will be much better than 6 to 1 because of the maturity of 14 months.
I dont know where you bought these cattle, but a normal steer should be hitting 1000 lbs by month 12 even a later maturing gert or brangus-- oh well
 
OP
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Anonymous

Thanks to both of you for the replies. Seems like I should up their feed or set my sights for an extra month.
As far as weight or age, I got them a year ago at auction. They were ~250lbs if I remember right. I could be off on the age, or off on the weight. I dont have scales, but may be able to get a tape on them while they feed.
 
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Anonymous

Onry SOB's wont let me get a tape on em while they eat. I just picked up 600lbs of 12% custom mix. Gonna feed out 2% per day per steer, and see where that gets me. Thanks again
 

Willow Springs

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If you are trying to finish them in the next 3 months you wont do it on your feed schedule. You are currently feeding them 12 lbs of feed for a total of 1.56 lbs of Total protein --- not good enough.
Usually feed conversion rates for cattle are 6:1 (6 lbs of feed per pound of gain.
You need to be feeding about 2.0 lbs of Total Protein per day which is .13 x 17 lbs x .90 = 1.99

I agree they need more grain to get the energy level up to get them gaining weight and finished, but protein shouldn't be an issue. I don't know what shape or stage the grass is in but they will be getting some protein from it and your calculations don't seem to take that into account.
 

TexasBred

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Willow Springs":qet2njs1 said:
If you are trying to finish them in the next 3 months you wont do it on your feed schedule. You are currently feeding them 12 lbs of feed for a total of 1.56 lbs of Total protein --- not good enough.
Usually feed conversion rates for cattle are 6:1 (6 lbs of feed per pound of gain.
You need to be feeding about 2.0 lbs of Total Protein per day which is .13 x 17 lbs x .90 = 1.99

I agree they need more grain to get the energy level up to get them gaining weight and finished, but protein shouldn't be an issue. I don't know what shape or stage the grass is in but they will be getting some protein from it and your calculations don't seem to take that into account.

Yep....and high protein with low energy is just whizzing in the wind. You might as well feed them range cubes if all you want is protein. Feed a good high energy, highly digestible feed that will not only meet the daily requirements for maintenance but also meet the energy needs for conversion to "gain".
 
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Anonymous

The feed I picked up is the same mix that the local ranchers are using for finishing their personal freezer steers.
I dont know what the TDM level is, but if they are using it, good enough for me. Also, with all the rain we have had here in Fl lately, the 2 steers can keep up with the pasture growth. Lots of seed heads. We only have a little "farmette" and they are on 3 acres. I dont think roughage is an issue. It was an issue back in the fall and winter, and may account for their slow growth. That and I think they were pulled from momma too early. They are filling out nicely now, and I can tell the difference in the last week since I posted the topic. I have been trying to find the balance between feed, grass, and my wallet and still learning. Although I do get $4/lb hanging weight (butcher fees inlc.) I do them in pairs, one for my family, and on for sale. I market them as close to organic as you can get without certifying them, and have the 2nd one presold already. But thats another topic.
 

terra8186

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Although I do get $4/lb hanging weight (butcher fees inlc.) I do them in pairs, one for my family, and on for sale. I market them as close to organic as you can get without certifying them, and have the 2nd one presold already.

You aren't feeding them organic. You are feeding them natural. I am pretty sure you can't find organic grain. If you could find it, I would assume you coundn't afford it. Most people who feed their cattle organic feed them on grass.

I feed mine mostly corn, oats and supplements. Growing large quantities of corn without herbicides and chemical fertilizers is a difficult task.
 
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Anonymous

I agree. I only market it that way because most of my buyers could care less about the difference.
I feel comfortable saying that because 2 things...until they hit about this size...850-900 lbs, they are on either grass, or locally grown hay that I know the grower. Once they hit the size, I feed them the grain. Now, I know its not organic, but its awful close.
TBH, I tell the buyers this " they are grain and grass fed,and get hay when needed. No hormones, steroids, feed lots. The only thing they get is wormers once I get them. Its so close to organic its not even funny"
I know it sounds like a line, but its true at the same time. If I ever had to give antibiotics, I wouldnt tell them that. to date I havent had to do anything but feed any of the headI raised. I may just be lucky.
This is not to knock anyone that does shoot them up with whatever, its just me and what the people I deal with are looking for. I know it takes me longer to do them this way, and if you ask me its worth it..but I dont do it for a living either. :tiphat:
 

novaman

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Sounds like your just telling your customers what they want to hear and not necessarily the truth. Not a good way to do business in my opinion. I guess I produce almost organic milk in that case too.
 
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Anonymous

No, it is the truth..they are fed grass, hay, and grain. They are given any shots, only a wormer. I know a few small timers like me that give their animals shots every 2 weeks, one for this one for that, oh, he might need this one too, might as well give it to them.
How is that telling them what they want to hear?
I guess I brought up a sore subject by saying the "O" word. I guess I will start saying natural instead..my buyers wont care.
 

novaman

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hooknline":xs6qwjkw said:
I guess I brought up a sore subject by saying the "O" word. I guess I will start saying natural instead..my buyers wont care.
Organic is not a sore subject with me. However, I do get annoyed when the term is abused. If your certified organic, than by all means advertise organic products, but if your not certified it isn't organic no matter how close you are to running them "organically". Further, if your buyers won't care if you sell natural beef rather than organic why are you feeding them this line of bull?
 
OP
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Anonymous

please re read my post. I said it was close to organic, but never called it organic. As for feeding them the "line of bull"
I respectfully disagree. They do care what goes into their food, as do I. Until recently I never new there was much of a diff between organic and natural. With the exception of the grain, wormer, and whatever shots they get as calves before I get them, I still say they are close. But I wont call them organic and never have.I only said they were close.
Sorry to stir things up, that was not my intention
 

TexasBred

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hooknline":2il77fcv said:
please re read my post. I said it was close to organic, but never called it organic. As for feeding them the "line of bull"
I respectfully disagree. They do care what goes into their food, as do I. Until recently I never new there was much of a diff between organic and natural. With the exception of the grain, wormer, and whatever shots they get as calves before I get them, I still say they are close. But I wont call them organic and never have.I only said they were close.
Sorry to stir things up, that was not my intention

Throw organic into your gardening efforts (I now you simply mis-spoke) and use "grass fed" if that's what they are...otherwise just tell them you don't use any growth harmones.
 
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Anonymous

will do and thanks. Like I said, Im just small time in for the fun of it, and didnt mean to start junk with the people in it for a living
 

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