Pipe/Post pounders

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cfpinz

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If you have easy access to drill stem I’d say the driver is a must have.
That I don't. But I'm curious what you refer to as drill stem? What diameter is it and do you use it for line posts/corners, etc? What do you figure the average cost is per post?

Thank You.
 

RDFF

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I use fiberglass sucker rod from the oil fields. 1 1/4"... best thing you could ever have for line posts on electric fence for sure. Very strong, no insulators to break, no metal posts to ground out the fence. Basically 0 maintenance. Fiberglass Rod Post 1-1/4" - 6' - – Powerflex (powerflexfence.com) I won't use T posts ever again.

1610757369769.png
I also use fiberglass posts for end posts/corners/H braces. No tube wraps required, never will ground out.
FP4.5x7 ~ Fiberglass Corner Post – Powerflex (powerflexfence.com)
1610757285653.png
They also have a smaller diameter... they show using this for the cross member in an H brace, with the larger posts for the verticals.
FP2.5x7 ~ 2 1/2" x 7' Fiberglass Pipe Post – Powerflex (powerflexfence.com)
1610757915515.png
 

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Lucky

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That I don't. But I'm curious what you refer to as drill stem? What diameter is it and do you use it for line posts/corners, etc? What do you figure the average cost is per post?

Thank You.
Oil field pipe. I can get 2 7/8” for about $32 for a 30’ joint and 2 3/8” for $25. There’s some waste as far as pipe goes but we always use it for something. I cut the joints 9 1/2’ for corner uprights and 8’ for in betweens. The 2 3/8 I cut 8’ for line post. Another deal is the driver I bought was 2 grand, not sure if I’d feel the same about a $8-10k driver. If I buy a $1,000 worth at a time he’ll deliver for $1 a mile.
 

cfpinz

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I use fiberglass sucker rod from the oil fields. 1 1/4"... best thing you could ever have for line posts on electric fence for sure. Very strong, no insulators to break, no metal posts to ground out the fence. Basically 0 maintenance. Fiberglass Rod Post 1-1/4" - 6' - – Powerflex (powerflexfence.com) I won't use T posts ever again.

View attachment 1644
I also use fiberglass posts for end posts/corners/H braces. No tube wraps required, never will ground out.
FP4.5x7 ~ Fiberglass Corner Post – Powerflex (powerflexfence.com)
View attachment 1643
They also have a smaller diameter... they show using this for the cross member in an H brace, with the larger posts for the verticals.
FP2.5x7 ~ 2 1/2" x 7' Fiberglass Pipe Post – Powerflex (powerflexfence.com)
View attachment 1646
That's interesting, never seen anything like it. Looks like the posts would shatter if you hit a large/shelf rock while driving???
 

cfpinz

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Oil field pipe. I can get 2 7/8” for about $32 for a 30’ joint and 2 3/8” for $25. There’s some waste as far as pipe goes but we always use it for something. I cut the joints 9 1/2’ for corner uprights and 8’ for in betweens. The 2 3/8 I cut 8’ for line post. Another deal is the driver I bought was 2 grand, not sure if I’d feel the same about a $8-10k driver. If I buy a $1,000 worth at a time he’ll deliver for $1 a mile.
That's pretty attractive. How do you go about attaching barbed wire to the line posts (in betweens)? Do you bother welding caps on the posts or just leave them open on top?
 
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Lucky

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That's pretty attractive. How do you go about attaching barbed wire to the line posts (in betweens)? Do you bother welding caps on the posts or just leave them open on top?
When I said inbetweens I meant the cross section for the H braces. I always build a double H so it takes 1 1/2 sticks to build one. I buy some little weld on clips the metal shop sales to attach the wire to the line post. I’ve went back and capped everything now but I really don’t think it’s needed. I think Fenceman recommends not capping metal post.
 

TomA

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I think it is good to cap pipe posts. I cap them with concrete when I set them.
Out here in California I think I paid $50 for 30 ft lengths of oil field pipe.
 

RDFF

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That's interesting, never seen anything like it. Looks like the posts would shatter if you hit a large/shelf rock while driving???
The 1 1/4" solid rod I use for line posts do pretty well when I hit a rock, generally will slide off to one side or another without damage. They're very tough, don't shatter, but will mushroom the bottom end a bit I expect if you were right on top of one. If you're in solid shelf rock, like shale, I'd guess you'd be better off with steel though. They would be able to shatter right through that, especially if you've got a "vibrator type" of power driver, but I'm pretty sure that these wouldn't.

The ones I use for H braced post sets would be more difficult in/on a fairly solid rock... they can shatter the end against the rock... so steel again there would be better if you're wanting to drive them in.

I do drive them all in, (1 1/4's with a regular T post driver by hand, end posts with a Shaver hydraulic post pounder) but I've not got a solid rock base here, just plenty of granite rocks buried in the dirt, left by the glacier they tell me. If I hit one that's pretty solid, I stop and move the post a foot or so to find a more rock free spot. U of MN did a boring on my farm a couple years ago.... 120' to bedrock, mostly glacial till. About 10'+ of A/B horizon... so not much to be concerned about when putting posts in.
 

Brute 23

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The 1 1/4" solid rod I use for line posts do pretty well when I hit a rock, generally will slide off to one side or another without damage. They're very tough, don't shatter, but will mushroom the bottom end a bit I expect if you were right on top of one. If you're in solid shelf rock, like shale, I'd guess you'd be better off with steel though. They would be able to shatter right through that, especially if you've got a "vibrator type" of power driver, but I'm pretty sure that these wouldn't.

The ones I use for H braced post sets would be more difficult in/on a fairly solid rock... they can shatter the end against the rock... so steel again there would be better if you're wanting to drive them in.

I do drive them all in, (1 1/4's with a regular T post driver by hand, end posts with a Shaver hydraulic post pounder) but I've not got a solid rock base here, just plenty of granite rocks buried in the dirt, left by the glacier they tell me. If I hit one that's pretty solid, I stop and move the post a foot or so to find a more rock free spot. U of MN did a boring on my farm a couple years ago.... 120' to bedrock, mostly glacial till. About 10'+ of A/B horizon... so not much to be concerned about when putting posts in.
The fg rods have threads on each end?

I'm assuming they are rods for pumping units. They are made to hold quite a bit of weight and be pretty durable. It's just a lighter version of a steel sucker rod.

The fg pipe can be hard to come by because it rarely goes bad. When you found a piece of 2" or so it's like god in the oil field because every one wants them for cheater pipes. It's very durable and lighter than steel.
 

RDFF

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The fg rods have threads on each end?

I'm assuming they are rods for pumping units. They are made to hold quite a bit of weight and be pretty durable. It's just a lighter version of a steel sucker rod.

The fg pipe can be hard to come by because it rarely goes bad. When you found a piece of 2" or so it's like god in the oil field because every one wants them for cheater pipes. It's very durable and lighter than steel.
When they come as whole used rod, they're 36' long between the really heavy solid steel ends that are epoxied onto the fiberglass rod. Each one of those steel ends weighs about 15# I think. They get cut off, and scrapped. The fiberglass rod without the ends on it weighs about 1#/foot, 6' post = 6#.

Yes, they're used pull rod for the pumping units. Pretty much indestructible.
 

Atimm693

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I agree with the fiberglass electric posts.

Only tough thing about them is fastening the wire. We drilled them and used a cotter pin shaped tie wire, works pretty good but drilling all the posts was tedious.
 

RDFF

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I agree with the fiberglass electric posts.

Only tough thing about them is fastening the wire. We drilled them and used a cotter pin shaped tie wire, works pretty good but drilling all the posts was tedious.
You can buy them predrilled if you want too, usually they charge .25/hole.

I drill them as I use them, don't want any more holes in them than necessary (these posts are STRONG, but any hole will weaken it a bit). Never know where you might need to use them, or what the wire spacing might be. Perimeter is 3 wire, internal 1 wire. I drilled holes in an old steel U post for a story board. Welded a short piece of flat over the top end so I can hang it on the posts after driving them ALL in, the length of the run. Then just go down the line with a cordless drill and a couple of fully charged batteries in your pocket, with a 3/16" carbide tipped cement bit. I've drilled several thousand holes with the same bit, still working great. I use a hammer drill, seems to speed it up a little. Before using a carbide drill though, I could burn up bits in no time, AND wear out the man trying to make the durn thing work.

Typically I drill all the posts, then come back with my wire ties and hang the wires... speeds up the process. I don't use cotter pins.... just cut a whole soup can full (easy to carry with you down the line) of 7-8" long pieces of 14 ga. soft galvanized, stick through the post underneath the wire, bend over the top of the wire loosely and twist tie it 2 rounds behind the post. Don't tie tightly... that HT wire is supposed to be able to stretch the whole length of the fence.

Install end posts... pull up 1 wire to establish the line... drive in all line posts... drill all posts... pull in other wires and "pretension slightly"... hang all wires in a single pass... final tension wires to preference

I try to standardize my inventory. All end posts are 4 1/2" x 8' long fiberglass, including the cross bar for H brace. Use only 1 1/4" x 6' for line posts, even on 1 wire electric (anything much lighter and it won't support the weight and tension of a polywire reel for daily breaks anyway). I've been installing only 3 wire and 1 wire fences (don't have sheep or goats), so when I drill for 1 wire fence, I'm putting in only a single hole, where the middle wire would be on a 3 wire fence. That way, even if I take posts out, they will still work no matter where I need to use one.
 

Atimm693

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You can buy them predrilled if you want too, usually they charge .25/hole.

I drill them as I use them, don't want any more holes in them than necessary (these posts are STRONG, but any hole will weaken it a bit). Never know where you might need to use them, or what the wire spacing might be. Perimeter is 3 wire, internal 1 wire. I drilled holes in an old steel U post for a story board. Welded a short piece of flat over the top end so I can hang it on the posts after driving them ALL in, the length of the run. Then just go down the line with a cordless drill and a couple of fully charged batteries in your pocket, with a 3/16" carbide tipped cement bit. I've drilled several thousand holes with the same bit, still working great. I use a hammer drill, seems to speed it up a little. Before using a carbide drill though, I could burn up bits in no time, AND wear out the man trying to make the durn thing work.

Typically I drill all the posts, then come back with my wire ties and hang the wires... speeds up the process. I don't use cotter pins.... just cut a whole soup can full (easy to carry with you down the line) of 7-8" long pieces of 14 ga. soft galvanized, stick through the post underneath the wire, bend over the top of the wire loosely and twist tie it 2 rounds behind the post. Don't tie tightly... that HT wire is supposed to be able to stretch the whole length of the fence.

Install end posts... pull up 1 wire to establish the line... drive in all line posts... drill all posts... pull in other wires and "pretension slightly"... hang all wires in a single pass... final tension wires to preference

I try to standardize my inventory. All end posts are 4 1/2" x 8' long fiberglass, including the cross bar for H brace. Use only 1 1/4" x 6' for line posts, even on 1 wire electric (anything much lighter and it won't support the weight and tension of a polywire reel for daily breaks anyway). I've been installing only 3 wire and 1 wire fences (don't have sheep or goats), so when I drill for 1 wire fence, I'm putting in only a single hole, where the middle wire would be on a 3 wire fence. That way, even if I take posts out, they will still work no matter where I need to use one.

Like you, we bought them as full sticks. Cut them with an abrasive at first, then a portaband.

I don't use a cotter pin either, but like you, used some soft tie wire and bent them into a shape roughly like a cotter pin.

The cement bit is a good idea. Never tried that. Had to keep several extra steel bits in a water bottle and rotate through them.

I also put some of that fiberglass rod up on the side of a haybarn as rails to keep hay from pushing on the tin. Worked pretty well for that.
 

RDFF

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Like you, we bought them as full sticks. Cut them with an abrasive at first, then a portaband.

I don't use a cotter pin either, but like you, used some soft tie wire and bent them into a shape roughly like a cotter pin.

The cement bit is a good idea. Never tried that. Had to keep several extra steel bits in a water bottle and rotate through them.

I also put some of that fiberglass rod up on the side of a haybarn as rails to keep hay from pushing on the tin. Worked pretty well for that.
I cut them with a circular saw with a diamond blade on it. I'd forget the "cotter pin bend" on the wire... you've only got one strand of wire holding it either way, and it's a whole lot easier to just stick the wire through, and bend it over the top of the HT wire and tie it behind. I then bend the ends forward toward the HT wire around the post, so nothing catches on them too.

1611114782248.png1611114889062.png
 

Atimm693

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I cut them with a circular saw with a diamond blade on it. I'd forget the "cotter pin bend" on the wire... you've only got one strand of wire holding it either way, and it's a whole lot easier to just stick the wire through, and bend it over the top of the HT wire and tie it behind. I then bend the ends forward toward the HT wire around the post, so nothing catches on them too.

View attachment 1706View attachment 1707
I'll try to grab a pic of how we did them, too hard to explain. It's very strong, but I have had the issue doing repairs in the past where they grab the wire too tight and I need to go back and unhook them to retension the wire.
 

RDFF

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I'll try to grab a pic of how we did them, too hard to explain. It's very strong, but I have had the issue doing repairs in the past where they grab the wire too tight and I need to go back and unhook them to retension the wire.
Yup... you want that wire to be able to slide through your "clip" without any resistance, so when it's hit by a deer, for example, it can stretch the whole length of the fence. Can't get much simpler, OR lower cost, for a fastener than what I posted above.
ssterry:

For line posts on an electric or smooth wire high tensile,
Timeless Fence makes a really good pre-drilled post.

ProductTPosts.jpg


I've heard that these are good too. Greg Judy promotes them... A 6' x 1.5" (5/16ths wall thickness... their lightest) is $7.75+shipping from Timeless, a 6' x 1 1/4" rod is $6.30+shipping from Powerflex . Fairly comparable pricewise, especially if you want to have the rods pre-drilled. Personally, I don't feel that the drilling is very difficult or terribly time consuming, and prefer to drill them in the field as needed on installation. I've not seen a Timeless post, but I'd be willing to bet that the 1 1/4" rod is substantially more of a post. The fiberglass rod SHOULD be painted though, to avoid "bloom". The Timeless post won't need painting, as it's been coated with a UV protectant (paint) at the factory.

I would STILL tie the wire to the Timeless though with a wire like I've shown, because of simplicity of installation and maintenance. If you ever DID break one, it'd be hard to replace without pulling the wires out of those holes... which would mean out of the WHOLE FENCE to the end!!! You WANT to be able to replace the individual components of your fence as easily as possible too, if necessary.

1611167949235.png
 

C-Ranch

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I've use a gas powered post pounder on T-posts for the last 4 years, best investment I made. Sure saves time and can pound in rocky conditions.
As for pounding in 3" drill pipe or smaller I use the Montana T-Rex 350E on the front on my tractor. Again sure beats drilling holes in rocky areas and pounds them in with no issues.

 

sstterry

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Yup... you want that wire to be able to slide through your "clip" without any resistance, so when it's hit by a deer, for example, it can stretch the whole length of the fence. Can't get much simpler, OR lower cost, for a fastener than what I posted above.
ssterry:

For line posts on an electric or smooth wire high tensile,
Timeless Fence makes a really good pre-drilled post.

ProductTPosts.jpg


I've heard that these are good too. Greg Judy promotes them...
The home office and where they make them is about 15 miles from me.
 

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