Pinzgauer market

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Anonymous

I am interested in starting a small Pinzgauer operation, but since they are fairly new to this country I was wondering how the commercial markets are treating them. How do they compare to the herford and angus markets?



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A

Anonymous

What do you consider "fairly new"? They've been in the US 30 plus years but just never really caught on. We checked into them for the continentl part of our crossbreeding and found they still have calving ease problems and there is really no depth to the gene pool. Cundiff at MARC was very high on them as litle as 3 years ago, our vet that worked in the repro program at MARC considered them rather then Angus but found the market limited, the striped back a marketing negative. No matter what is said, folks still think of them as Longhorns. At least in this part of the country. No significant EPD program also hurts them.

dun

> I am interested in starting a
> small Pinzgauer operation, but
> since they are fairly new to this
> country I was wondering how the
> commercial markets are treating
> them. How do they compare to the
> herford and angus markets?
 
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A

Anonymous

> We have the same problem in calif.
> that they look like longhorns and
> the price drops on the commercial
> market. and they can be very hard calving on cows and for sure a no-no on heifers.
 

PATB

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The pinz I have seen at the local fair needed more muscle and rump. They had the look of milking shorthorns, they needed more muscling. The major problem I can think of is finding good quality stock and excellent quality bulls to use. They are in the line with other breeds that never really caught on and have a very shallow gene pool to choose from. I think one would be better off with the more common breeds, angus, simmi, gelbviegh, herdford, brahman influenced cattle. Raise whatever makes you happy.
 

paul swisher

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I Hear you all talking about Pinzgauers calving problems, looking like long horns.... Let me give some facts not guesses or bs. MARC Progress Report #4 May 1993 Table 2 - Breed cross differences Pinz-X 95.9% calvings unassisted compared to orig HA-X 94.4%, Char-X 91.2%, of the first recorded 3,700 U.S. calvings 1% required assistance. We have 60+ moma's and would lie to say we never have to pull a calf but my gelbveigh neighbors have many more and the commercial breeders dont do anywhere as well. As to telling them from a longhorn those are the same people than think everything black looks like an Angus. Looking like a milk cow they are milk cows - Dual purpose in Europe, and as a result probably wean as good a calf as there is we have raised Hereford, Semi's and have never had as good a moma's.
 

PINZ Farmer

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I would have to agree witht the last post. i have done some research on this breed but jus a few days ago i went and talked to one of the biggest breeders in ohio and he has 25 head. so yes there is not many around but i dont think what u all said was true. first u can always tell its a pinzgauer because the white tail and white hair around the tail. secondly the guy we talked to, his herd seemed very good and he had calves that jus got weaned, calves still on there mama, and steers for freezer beef and honestly they all looked very good. good musclin, good structure. u might of jus seen some bad ones possibly. and also like someone mentioned they dont get confused with longhorns up here in ohio mainly cuz there are very few if any that go through the sale barn. the gene pool is very small but like for example the guy i talked to sells bulls and heifers as breeding stock and i am sure some of those bulls are pretty good and dependin on where the bull goes, u can probably get some semen from him. and i think that pinzgauers would be a good breed to get started with if u ask me. yes they have a few minor problems but the guy i talked to said he has never had pinkeye, doesnot pull to often and plus the rate of gain and the taste of there meat is excellent so by far the good qualities outweigh the bad.


joe
 
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A

Anonymous

Might be good for a small scale direct marketing operation for any quality animals that could not be sold for high enough amounts to other breeders. As I recall, the MARC studies ranked the Pinz meat at the very top of the pecking order for tenderness and I think also very high for taste & marbling as well. Arnold Z.
 

dun

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The comment concerning the LH comparison wasn't or at least shoudln't have been considered that you can't tell them apart. It was that the buyers can and will dock them becasue of the stripe being similar to LH. If a buyer can come up with a reason to lower the price they will do it. It's like being able to pay a little less in some areas for red calves vs black calves. They can do it so they do.
My only real exposure to them for calving ease was in the early and mid 80's They had calving problems then, but most of the continental breeds did when compard to the more common british breeds. There were a number of Simmenthal bulls that were called heifer killers, but as the gene pool expanded those problems really diminished. The Pinzgaur still have that comparitivly small gene pool so there can't have been as much improvement just becasue of the shear lack of numbers.

dun



paul swisher":1hshyxkv said:
I Hear you all talking about Pinzgauers calving problems, looking like long horns.... Let me give some facts not guesses or bs. MARC Progress Report #4 May 1993 Table 2 - Breed cross differences Pinz-X 95.9% calvings unassisted compared to orig HA-X 94.4%, Char-X 91.2%, of the first recorded 3,700 U.S. calvings 1% required assistance. We have 60+ moma's and would lie to say we never have to pull a calf but my gelbveigh neighbors have many more and the commercial breeders dont do anywhere as well. As to telling them from a longhorn those are the same people than think everything black looks like an Angus. Looking like a milk cow they are milk cows - Dual purpose in Europe, and as a result probably wean as good a calf as there is we have raised Hereford, Semi's and have never had as good a moma's.
 
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