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Pigs

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Vanner

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Not to change the subject, but does anybody have any advice on raising pigs for first timers to get them ready for my freezer? I'm interested in maybe trying one to see how it works out. Pros/Cons? Kinds? Easy/Hard? Expense?
Thank you!
 

angie1

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Finished pigs are so cheap at the sales right now that you can go buy one butcher sized, haul it directly to the locker and come out WAY ahead in time and money. That may defeat the purpose, but I would not hesitate to do it that way. Pigs are destructive.
 

Workinonit Farm

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angie":caykarn9 said:
Finished pigs are so cheap at the sales right now that you can go buy one butcher sized, haul it directly to the locker and come out WAY ahead in time and money.

Yes, you can get one for a reasonable price that is 'killing size'. On the next point I will disagree with Angie (pretty much for the 1st time). Personally I would not haul it directly to the butcher/slaughter. I would hang onto it for a couple of weeks and feed it out a bit. Main reason being, you don't know what that pig may have been given just prior to arriving at the market. I would give time for any possible withdrawals to take place. I only know of one de-wormer that has no withdrawal period for hogs (Safeguard) the others range from a week to 60 days. Hang on to it for about 2 to 3 weeks, feeding it corn then you'll be ready to go for some fresh pork.

I raise hogs, very small scale, and my advice to you would be to research and read as much as you can before purchasing any pigs/hogs to raise and feed out. The MOST important thing necessary is good solid fencing, and a good workable means of loading onto the trailer or truck. People think goats can be escape artists, well pigs/hogs can be real Houdini's themselves.

My hog-pen fencing is buried a foot into the ground, double wire up to 3 feet then single wire/panel up to 5 feet. Have never had a problem with them escaping due to poor fencing. Make sure any gates or doors(on hog-houses) are sturdy. These are very smart animals and very strong.

Katherine
 

angie1

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Workinonit Farm":12ctqkzb said:
Personally I would not haul it directly to the butcher/slaughter. I would hang onto it for a couple of weeks and feed it out a bit. Main reason being, you don't know what that pig may have been given just prior to arriving at the market. I would give time for any possible withdrawals to take place.

Katherine
Excellent point ~ I had not thought of that. :oops:
 

LuckyLegs

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I just got 2 back from the butcher yesterday. Had grilled pork chops and smoked sausage last night and it was great. Fencing is key, I use cattle panels with 2 strands of electric wire on the inside stood off 5 " from the fence and roughly 6" and 18" off the ground - I have found this to thwart any rooting under the fence.

Next most important thing is fresh water, pigs will make a mess with a regular water trough, so I use a 55 gallon barrel with a screw-in nipple waterer. Put it on cinder blocks and strap tot eh fence or a tree, and you have a pig proof waterer - see nipple link - http://www.trojanlivestock.com/Large%20 ... attle.html Model 75 near bottom of page.

Also, IMO don't run pigs and cows in the same pasture.
 
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Vanner

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angie":12gclwzr said:
Workinonit Farm":12gclwzr said:
Personally I would not haul it directly to the butcher/slaughter. I would hang onto it for a couple of weeks and feed it out a bit. Main reason being, you don't know what that pig may have been given just prior to arriving at the market. I would give time for any possible withdrawals to take place.

Katherine
Excellent point ~ I had not thought of that. :oops:


Actually that was my whole point. Not knowing what went into the pig in the first place to get him to butcher size and just taking their word for it that it was 'properly' cared for! That would be my only hesitation. Besides the fact that I would need to build something for a short term period. Back of my SUV maybe!?
 

rusty

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I have thought about doing this also and everyone i've talked to said what has already been posted.By the time you buy them little ,feed them up to butcher you have way more in them.
 

jhambley

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I saw your post and had to show off our registered Hereford pigs. They're polled by the way :)



 

grannysoo

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Make sure that you're set up for them with good fencing and plenty of water and go for it. Pigs are very smart animals, so don't let them outsmart you! :lol2: You'll either love them or hate them.

Personally, I love pigs.
 

lilmac

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I keep mine behind an electric fence, the white or orange visable type. Just watch your spacing because if a pig is hit in front of his eyes he will back up, but if he is hit behind the eyes he will run forword and take the fence out. Good luck, and GOD bless,
Mac
 

terra8186

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Here is an earlier pig thread.

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=54769

From grannyso
You'll either love them or hate them.

Grannyso that isn't quite true. You will love them when you get them and hate them by the time they are ready for butchering. By next year, you can't wait to do it again. I am buying mine on Wednesday.
 
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Vanner

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jhambley... You obviously chose this breed for a reason. Price? Better meat? Temperament? Fast growers? Resale? Just curious. If it's none of my business, I understand. Does meat quality vary from breed to breed, or is a pig a pig? Thanks for the pictures and your help.
 

Workinonit Farm

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Vanner":1vwgrbnk said:
Does meat quality vary from breed to breed, or is a pig a pig? Thanks for the pictures and your help.

As with cattle, there are many variations within a breed as between breeds. Some breeds are 'known' for certain traits/qualities. I, personally, prefer Hampshires (Durocs being my 2nd choice). They are good mothers, nice temperaments, grow well and have a decent carcass. The sow/boar combo I am using makes for a nice balanced not too lean not too fat carcass.

The more popular/common breeds are Yorkshire, Berkshire, Chester Whites. Many people prefer the 'white' pigs. Large scale outfits generally raise white hogs.

The 'heirloom' breeds tout a better meat quality. Modern hogs have changed alot over the years, they are more lean and less fat than they used to be.

I think quality of meat has as much to do with the breed as it does with how they are raised and what they are fed.

Just my 2 cents.

Katherine
 

TheBullLady

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lol.. LOVE the "Hereford" pigs! I've never seen them colored quite that way before.

It's been a few years since I've raised any for the freezer, so I can't tell you about the prices, but when we did have them, they were relatively easy to feed out. We had an older dairy barn and just used some wood panels to section them off a good sized space for them. We bought one of the old timey metal pig feeders, which we filled with a mix from the feed mill, and it worked great. We also fed ours plenty of table scraps, and since we fed out a few for some other folks, they all brought them scraps as well. Pretty soon they were routinely getting fed Oreo cookies and Ike and Mikes, of all things! It was pretty funny because some of the guys ended up getting attached to them, and it was harder for them to let them go to be processed than it was for me!

One thing I do remember distinctly.. they like to be clean, and if you'll clean out their pen every day, they'll crap in the same place and rarely anywhere else. I could clean the pen in about 10 minutes easily.

It's like with raising your own beef.. once you've had your own processed, it's hard to go back to store bought.
 

jhambley

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vanner,

We wanted to try a heritage breed so we started looking through the ALBC web site and saw that the Herefords were on their threaten list of hogs. We did some research and found that they were supposed to be good pasture pigs and well adapted to our area as the breed was created in Missouri in the 1920s, They were created by blending Duroc, Chester and Poland China. We were also looking for a breed with a good disposition as our kids help us on the farm. I must admit that since we raise Horned Hereford cattle it seemed a natural fit for us. Having one of the nations top breeders about an hour away also made the decision a bit easier.

I think the Herefords are a good blend of old heritage doability with a more modern (leaner) carcass than the true fat hogs like the Goucestershire Old Spots. They didn't cost any more than I would have paid for any other pure breds and so far I'm very happy with them.

JH
 

Double R Ranch

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This litter is a duroc (sire) Hampshire (dam) cross. Makes for great meat and fast growth.
Double R
 

rc690

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Next to cattle, hogs are my favorite to raise. :) I almost hate to see them go to the butcher but then I think about the tenderloin and fresh bacon. :clap:
 

brandonm_13

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So far, the only ones I've raised are yorkshire/landrace crosses because that's what't easily found locally. I think I might try getting into breeding, but I would have to have a larger customer base. Right now, I buy piglets to raise for the family (parents, brothers, in-laws).
 

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