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Phenylbutzone ??

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Anonymous

Guest
What is Phenylbutzone? One of the Shorthorn cows I just purchased got stuck in an ice hole last winter, and limped a bit and then was prescribed this by the local older Vet. She recovered.

When I inspected her prior to purchase she had no limp or problems visable, and I watched her for some time. Apparently the person rounding her up and delivering her to me ran her a bit hard in the 600 acre pasture prior to loading her. (She was born May 10, 1997) She now has a limp, draging one of her hind hoves, looks like the knee is stiff. It is the same one she injured last winter. She drags it about 75% of the time, other short times it appears normal.

The Vet again told me to give her 1,000 mg of Phenylbutzone Powder every other day. She is a larger cow (even for a Shorthorn), but I do not have her current weight.

I searched all over the internet to no avail looking for info on this drug. I am hoping a vet heremayhave the info.

Thanks! Eaglewerks

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Anonymous

Guest
Phenylbutazone (bute) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent, sort of like aspirin. It can ulcerate the stomach, and has been linked with aplastic anemia in humans and some other species. I don't use this product in cattle myself, and seldom use it in horses. Look on google.com under phenylbutazone and you'll get more information there.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Vicki

I have a 22 year old horse who is arthritic in his front end. He's had radiographs of his front feet/legs and does have navicular in one front foot/leg. Our excellent horse vet moved away (sigh).

Is there an antiinflammatory type med that is safer than bute for horses, on either a short term or a long term basis? We have not been giving my horse bute, as I do worry about ulcers, but if there is something new out there that might make him more comfortable, I'd sure like to know about it.

He does see a good farrier and the navicular is under fair control, but he is so stiff in his shoulders. The vet felt he had some arthritis when he saw him last year.

This is a 5 gaited TN Walker/Saddlebred cross - a big horse, about 17 hands - who had years of pounding on his front end when gaiting. He doesn't push with his rear - he pulls with his front.

Thanks for any ideas you might have.

> Phenylbutazone (bute) is a
> non-steroidal anti-inflammatory
> agent, sort of like aspirin. It
> can ulcerate the stomach, and has
> been linked with aplastic anemia
> in humans and some other species.
> I don't use this product in cattle
> myself, and seldom use it in
> horses. Look on google.com under
> phenylbutazone and you'll get more
> information there.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Frankly, unless it's acute in nature, I've had as much luck longterm with glucosamine orally, cosequin orally or adequan injected IM. None cause ulcers, they relieve pain by joint cartilage repair, and they work. Cosequin is possibly the most expensive and has the most research on it since it is a patented formulation. Adequan is also expensive, but very effective. All are available in the US.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I posted a lengthy response to this and yet it's disappeared. If you read it, this one is less detailed since I'm much more exhausted than I was then. Try glucosamine, cosequin or adequan. They will decrease pain through improving cartilage thickness and fluid viscosity within the joint. There are studies on them. If you need further info, just ask. V
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Vicki,

Thank you for taking time to explain. We picked up some SynoviCre EQ and will start him on it.

Thanks again,

Linda

> Frankly, unless it's acute in
> nature, I've had as much luck
> longterm with glucosamine orally,
> cosequin orally or adequan
> injected IM. None cause ulcers,
> they relieve pain by joint
> cartilage repair, and they work.
> Cosequin is possibly the most
> expensive and has the most
> research on it since it is a
> patented formulation. Adequan is
> also expensive, but very
> effective. All are available in
> the US.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Vicki, I wish you were my vet. You explain it like it is and if you don't know you say so. My hereford heifer I emailed you about a month ago that limped and had a swollen front leg DIED. I gave bute and dexamenthozone at the same time. 10cc dex for three days. Swelling would go and return. Heifer went off feed, developed bloody scours, a bad situation. One experienced vet in Texas said never give the two durgs at the same time as they would counter one another. I blame myself and may have over did it with treatment. I also use hydrotherapy on the leg twice daily for over three weeks to no avail. I think you point of be careful what one treats with, in conjuction with what other drugs and dosage. I tried with great care but lost this battle. Thanks for sharing info. Your customers should really appreciate you.

> Phenylbutazone (bute) is a
> non-steroidal anti-inflammatory
> agent, sort of like aspirin. It
> can ulcerate the stomach, and has
> been linked with aplastic anemia
> in humans and some other species.
> I don't use this product in cattle
> myself, and seldom use it in
> horses. Look on google.com under
> phenylbutazone and you'll get more
> information there.

[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
For crying out loud, put the horse down! You must love yourself more than the horse. You're keeping that pathatic animal alive because of your own hangups. Are you so "new age" that you can't let an animal die an instant, painless and dignified death? Must you keep pouring money, time and "feel good" emotion into an animal who's time has come? 22 years old??? Give the poor horse a break.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
This was one of the most insensitive, pathetic pieces of tripe I have ever been unfortunate enough to read. I hope that someone realizes how stiff you are one day and thinks of doing the same....no, actually I don't, since I respect life. My job is not to needlessly prolong life, but to give an animal a good life. It is definitely possible to do that, even with a 22 year old stiff horse with navicular disease. V
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I agree. I don't believe in needlessly prolonging life, but I do believe in giving any animal a good life. In other words if suffering and can't be helped, then put the animal down. Twenty-two years is really not old for a horse anymore. There are older horses, although not three year olds, but still in the play time frame of mind.

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