Pasture Ornaments vs Hamburger Hooves

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Can't help but notice to obvious distaste in Longhorn Cattle. "In my opinion," most (if not all) individuals raising Longhorn cattle realize two basic facts:
(1) Our average head will bring more $$$ compared to the average beef head. Sure there will always be extenuating circumstances; AI with latest/greatest semen, flushing the latest female champion, etc. But my average registered Longhorn will bring $$$ than my neighbors registered Angus.
(2) At the end of the year, he will have out-sold me; I can admit that honestly. Beef cattle are easier marketed and sold whereas Longhorn are mostly sold via private treaty.
The ironic part concerns the average Longhorn rancher can admit the above issue whereas the average Beef rancher feels superior.

Even more ironic centers around the issue that Longhorn cattle are more difficult to raise. (Sure we can argue feed lots, but I imagine the average small rancher.)
(1) I sure wish I could have purchased a head gate as compared to building a Medina Hinge.
(2) When one head needs to be examined, the issue of running it down the chute becomes cumbersome.
(3) Both breed for conformation, size, milking ability, calving ease, etc BUT I have to also concentrate upon horn shape & size.
(4) Feeding or simply working in a confined area requires more attention.

Personally, I raise cattle, not as a means for support, but because of the lifestyle. I raise Longhorn Cattle (aka "Pasture Ornaments") due to their heritage, uniqueness, color, and horn.
Looking forward to reading other opinions and of course the arguments... Gotta go feed my "pasture ornaments" and help my buddy separate his "hamburger hooves"
 

KNERSIE

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1) I sure wish I could have purchased a head gate as compared to building a Medina Hinge.
(2) When one head needs to be examined, the issue of running it down the chute becomes cumbersome.
(3) Both breed for conformation, size, milking ability, calving ease, etc BUT I have to also concentrate upon horn shape & size.
(4) Feeding or simply working in a confined area requires more attention.

You know there is an easy solution for that? ;-)
 

alacattleman

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B&L Longhorn Ranch":b4qgiudj said:
Can't help but notice to obvious distaste in Longhorn Cattle. "In my opinion," most (if not all) individuals raising Longhorn cattle realize two basic facts:
(1) Our average head will bring more $$$ compared to the average beef head. Sure there will always be extenuating circumstances; AI with latest/greatest semen, flushing the latest female champion, etc. But my average registered Longhorn will bring $$$ than my neighbors registered Angus.
(2) At the end of the year, he will have out-sold me; I can admit that honestly. Beef cattle are easier marketed and sold whereas Longhorn are mostly sold via private treaty.
The ironic part concerns the average Longhorn rancher can admit the above issue whereas the average Beef rancher feels superior.

Even more ironic centers around the issue that Longhorn cattle are more difficult to raise. (Sure we can argue feed lots, but I imagine the average small rancher.)
(1) I sure wish I could have purchased a head gate as compared to building a Medina Hinge.
(2) When one head needs to be examined, the issue of running it down the chute becomes cumbersome.
(3) Both breed for conformation, size, milking ability, calving ease, etc BUT I have to also concentrate upon horn shape & size.
(4) Feeding or simply working in a confined area requires more attention.

Personally, I raise cattle, not as a means for support, but because of the lifestyle. I raise Longhorn Cattle (aka "Pasture Ornaments") due to their heritage, uniqueness, color, and horn.Looking forward to reading other opinions and of course the arguments... Gotta go feed my "pasture ornaments" and help my buddy separate his "hamburger hooves"
nothing wrong with that as long as you have the capital.... i raised what i liked at one time,
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Can't help but notice to obvious distaste in Longhorn Cattle. "In my opinion," most (if not all) individuals raising Longhorn cattle realize two basic facts:
(1) Our average head will bring more $$$ compared to the average beef head. Sure there will always be extenuating circumstances; AI with latest/greatest semen, flushing the latest female champion, etc. But my average registered Longhorn will bring $$$ than my neighbors registered Angus.
That is a pretty broad statement. I would have to say that if that is true, it is a regional benefit.
(2) At the end of the year, he will have out-sold me; I can admit that honestly. Beef cattle are easier marketed and sold whereas Longhorn are mostly sold via private treaty.
You're saying you have more LABOR and maybe cost in keeping a cow, so her offspring would have to bring more to break even. Don't know what kind of prices you are talking, but I would rather sell 10 $3000 heifers than sell one $5000 Longhorn????

And, if you are any kind of true BREEDER, than the majority of your bulls are castrated - only saving the BEST for breeding bulls. Therefore, I would guess, your steer calf crop does NOT sell for as much as your local neighbors COMMERCIAL steers. You have to look at the WHOLE picture. Not just a few animals you sold for more than your neighbor's.
 

TexasBred

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Glad you love your longhorns. I'm sure they work for some folks as I see quite a few in all parts of the state. Those in the pics may grow into something valuable someday but as pictured are practically worthless. Just a personal thing but I think I'd rather have a sister working in a cathouse than a longhorn grazing in the pasture.
 

KNERSIE

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TexasBred":19ha95le said:
Glad you love your longhorns. I'm sure they work for some folks as I see quite a few in all parts of the state. Those in the pics may grow into something valuable someday but as pictured are practically worthless. Just a personal thing but I think I'd rather have a sister working in a cathouse than a longhorn grazing in the pasture.

Now that was funny! Maybe cowman30's thread has just put me in a very good mood, but I had a good giggle from your comment.

Seriously though if you don't love your breed you're not going to enjoy raising them. Unfortunately with the exception of probably just one or two longhorn breeders on CT the others seem to focus more on the ornamental side of the breed and that makes it hard for the rest of us to take the breed seriously as a beef breed.

I farm in a very tough part of the world and I do see the value longhorn genetics might have under tough conditions, I just don't see where a record horn length is going to help any operation other than the strictly ornamental herds.
 

Brandonm22

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More power to you as long as you can keep finding private treaty buyers for your calf crop. It is great whenever you can find a niche that will pay you more than commercial cattle are worth. That said, if I took 60 head of your 7 month old straightbred Longhorn calves to the stockyard (~420 lbs weaning weight??) and 60 head of your neighbors 7 month old straightbred Angus calves (~600 lbs weaning wts?) to the stockyard I think we both know who would typically be bringing home the biggest check.
 

KNERSIE

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Brandonm22":maer4tu3 said:
More power to you as long as you can keep finding private treaty buyers for your calf crop. It is great whenever you can find a niche that will pay you more than commercial cattle are worth. That said, if I took 60 head of your 7 month old straightbred Longhorn calves to the stockyard (~440 lbs weaning weight??) and 60 head of your neighbors 7 month old straightbred Angus calves (~600 lbs weaning wts?) to the stockyard I think we both know who would typically be bringing home the biggest check.

It is profit that counts, not who brings back the biggest cheques. If you can produce 60 longhorn calves with very little input you might well come out ahead with the longhorns if the angus required more inputs in THAT ENVIRONMENT.

BUT typically if the environment can support the angus or any other higher producing breed without ridiculous inputs, the longhorns are going to struggle in a strictly commercial feeder calf setup.
 

showing71

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Do you, B&L, or any other longhorn breeders, have trouble selling longhorn calves to feedlots? And how much of a hit do longhorns get at a sale barn? (We don't have many longhorns in my neck of the woods so the breed is kind of foreign to me) By my parents, there are 3 10,000+ head feedlots that will not take any animal that has more than a scur because of carcass bruising and injury.
 

Brandonm22

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KNERSIE":2gglthfs said:
Brandonm22":2gglthfs said:
More power to you as long as you can keep finding private treaty buyers for your calf crop. It is great whenever you can find a niche that will pay you more than commercial cattle are worth. That said, if I took 60 head of your 7 month old straightbred Longhorn calves to the stockyard (~440 lbs weaning weight??) and 60 head of your neighbors 7 month old straightbred Angus calves (~600 lbs weaning wts?) to the stockyard I think we both know who would typically be bringing home the biggest check.

It is profit that counts, not who brings back the biggest cheques. If you can produce 60 longhorn calves with very little input you might well come out ahead with the longhorns if the angus required more inputs in THAT ENVIRONMENT.

BUT typically if the environment can support the angus or any other higher producing breed without ridiculous inputs, the longhorns are going to struggle in a strictly commercial feeder calf setup.

You CAN spend $6000 a cow on hired managers, fertilizer, drilled in winter forages, brick show barns, rail fencing, purchased mixed feeds, alfalfa hay, customized duallies, and a fleet of 175 hp John Deeres whether you are raising Angus OR Texas Longhorns (that's really NOT that uncommon here). You don't get six foot long horn spreads by witholding the groceries. I do see where the Longhorn guy could have an advantage in his cost of production. That said in a relatively typical enviroment a good Angus herd is probably going to EASILY wean 180 pounds more per feeder calf and bring 15 cents a pound more at the same weight. If the environment is lush enough that the Angus wean the same percent calf crop as the LH cows , it is hard to see how the Longhorn wins in typical stockyard feeder calf scenario.
 

bigbull338

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i admire you for raising your breed of choice.regardless of what they bring at the sale barn.as long as you enjoy them thats all that matters.my brother is wanting some longhorns.but i doubt he will get any.an i know bred to a beefmaster they would throw good calves.i know a guy thats buying longhorns.an he is dehorning them.an running i think a black bull on them.
 
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You guys are alright after all... I had noticed a few snide comments concerning Longhorn cattle and wanted to read some serious, well thought-out comments and I thank you all! To answer a few comments...
* A few may be confused but, I admitted my neighbors, each and every one of them, will outsell me at the end of the year. Same environment but every Angus will bring more at the sale barn; I know this...
* Not raising cattle for means to support and consequently pay little attention to weaning weight, cost, sale price, etc.
* Never sold any Longhorns to any feed lots... I'm honest enough to realize I would take a HUGE hit.
* Only keep future herd sires; steer the rest and easily sold for pasture ornaments, freezer fill, and due to the wild hog problem "Hog Deterrents."

I can honestly see where it's difficult for many to take a Longhorn breeder seriously. I'll never compete with the "Big Boys" BUT my wife & I do our best. We look very seriously at the Dam/Sire as well as their Grand Dam/Sire of each calf we purchase. (If I can't find photos of all their ancestors I won't buy.) I really hate those Longhorns who horns grow out then straight up; I will only procure/breed ones that grow outward or the ones who's horns "twist." If the projections are less that 66", they'll never make it onto the place. (The one's in the photo are only +/- 5 mos old; the buckskin heifer for example is now over 36" and projected to reach just shy of 80"! 80" may seem like nothing but it is RARE in the Longhorn business unless you're one of the big boys) We also pay special attention to the colors and prefer the "splash" pattern (buckskin was the exception). The little bull in the photo is our future herd sire mainly due to his color splash. (Most of ours are the red/white) Lucky for us, we are within close proximity to Dallas/Ft Worth and we constantly notice those who retire move away from DFW and towards us. They are Texans and after they build their little "ranchette," they seem to want Longhorns to match-up with their new cowboy mentality and consequently the market is here. (LUCKILY!)

Gotta end by saying I love reading these boards! I hung-up the camouflage last September after 21-years with the Dept of the Army. I still remember setting up our sat dish and reading these while sitting in Bosnia, Kosovo, Romania, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Serbia, Israel, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, etc... I remained deployed the majority of the time but it was if I was home at times. All who post, THANK YOU, you never know where someone may be reading and missing home!
 

mnmtranching

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I really do appreciate that you enjoy what your doing. You have a market for the horns and color. 8)
Would be nothing but a laughing matter among cattle people. :nod:
 

Aero

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B&L Longhorn Ranch":2i21o39v said:
Can't help but notice to obvious distaste in Longhorn Cattle. "In my opinion," most (if not all) individuals raising Longhorn cattle realize two basic facts:
(1) Our average head will bring more $$$ compared to the average beef head. Sure there will always be extenuating circumstances; AI with latest/greatest semen, flushing the latest female champion, etc. But my average registered Longhorn will bring $$$ than my neighbors registered Angus.
(2) At the end of the year, he will have out-sold me; I can admit that honestly. Beef cattle are easier marketed and sold whereas Longhorn are mostly sold via private treaty.
The ironic part concerns the average Longhorn rancher can admit the above issue whereas the average Beef rancher feels superior.

Even more ironic centers around the issue that Longhorn cattle are more difficult to raise. (Sure we can argue feed lots, but I imagine the average small rancher.)
(1) I sure wish I could have purchased a head gate as compared to building a Medina Hinge.
(2) When one head needs to be examined, the issue of running it down the chute becomes cumbersome.
(3) Both breed for conformation, size, milking ability, calving ease, etc BUT I have to also concentrate upon horn shape & size.
(4) Feeding or simply working in a confined area requires more attention.

Personally, I raise cattle, not as a means for support, but because of the lifestyle. I raise Longhorn Cattle (aka "Pasture Ornaments") due to their heritage, uniqueness, color, and horn.
Looking forward to reading other opinions and of course the arguments... Gotta go feed my "pasture ornaments" and help my buddy separate his "hamburger hooves"

you need to figure out where you are, where you are going and be content with your own path.

you might know where you are (doubtful) and can probably imagine where you are going, but you are definitely looking in the wrong place for approval or justification of your path. people who are content with their path dont need to stretch justification for their choices.

if you didnt try to make it sound like you were really profitable, I could let it go and assume you are aware that it's a non-sustainable hobby unless you are funneling large sums of money into it.

how can it make sense to make a Longhorn that was designed to be the most efficient mammal in North America and turn them into some perverse high-maintenance bottomless pit? it just seems disrespectful to the breed.
 

Brandonm22

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I view the Longhorns like I view the rodeo cattle, the Wagyus, the minis, the bison, etc. If you can carve out your niche and serve that niche and make money in the cattle business I am all for it and I am very supportive of anybody who can make money breeding cattle. As long as it does not go overboard into dishonesty like the ostrich/emu thing did in it's heyday. That and the llamas/alpacas were just another pyramid scheme.....this one involving living breathing animals.
 

cross_7

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i'd admire you and what you are doing.
you seem believe in what you are doing and you are passionate about the breed and your breeding program
your making money and thats all that counts.
i bet your customer is the city guy that has made is money and mark on the world and wanted ranch to get away from everything on the weekends, so he buys him a ranch and a "rancher" need cattle but just for show so he can brag to his friends and family about his "prized high dollar longhorn"
so price is not a problem since he wants and can afford the the best and you have got just what he needs.
all i can say is
brilliant !!!!
 

Red Bull Breeder

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Alot of longhorn cows will raise a decent calf breed to a Char or Limi bull, seen them sell right up there with with other calves. And them longhorn cows are mighty cheap to keep.
 
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