pasture fence

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Anonymous

For pasture other then ends and corners steel t-posts are the only way to go. If you're going to use powered fencing some folks prefer fiberglass or "insulwood" posts. I still prefer T-posts for the same purpose.

dun

> which would be better to raise
> brangus in or does it matter,
> regular wood fence poles or those
> small steel fence poles (the green
> kind)?

> thank you.
 
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Anonymous

The most important thing on any fencing is to have substantial, sturdy, well-braced corner post units. We use (in our sandy soil) 2-7/8" pipe corner posts set 3' in ground with concrete. Then, about 8 to 10' out we set another similar post with cross brace between the two. Finally on the second post out, we put in a "deadman" post 3' deep and about 1 foot sticking out of ground with angle pipe from that one to the 2nd real post. By doing so, we can stretch 6 to 7 very tight barb wires up to 600-800 feet and using 8' T-Posts placed 10' on center. Our fences are 5-1/2' high. We sleep well at night.... P.S.: bottom barb wire is low enough so calf cannot crawl under the wire.

Finally, the length of post and depth of T-Posts or corner posts in ground depends 100% on your soil type and its holding ability. A fence is no stronger than its corner and end brace units. All of our brace units are welded used well pipe.

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Anonymous

Howdy all, on the outside perimeter, do you run field fence? I did, to keep out unwanted critters - however, it is costly.

What are your thoughts? Alex
 
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Anonymous

Agree, more costly. If you have problem with stray dogs, coyotes, wolves, etc., then might be cost-effective. On other hand, a "predator" guard animal such as Llama, donkey, etc. might work too.

We have Longhorns. We're also in stray dog and coyote country. Even our very young calves (month old or so) will stalk and chase out "small" critters such as cats, etc. The yearling and adult Longhorns have very good distance eyesight and will even come up to fence and watch some animal (or other roadside activity) on the other side of fence. Longhorns historically are very good predator control animals while being gentle creatures to their "friends." They will also gather around calves if danger is present. Unless they were outnumbered significantly by a pack of wolves or mountain lions, don't think the predator(s) would stand much of a chance.

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Anonymous

Along busy roads and calving paddocks we use field fence with two strands of barb on top. That's to keep calves in. for just generci property lines we use 5 stand barbs. Everything else is single strand hightensile electric

dun

> Agree, more costly. If you have
> problem with stray dogs, coyotes,
> wolves, etc., then might be
> cost-effective. On other hand, a
> "predator" guard animal
> such as Llama, donkey, etc. might
> work too.

> We have Longhorns. We're also in
> stray dog and coyote country. Even
> our very young calves (month old
> or so) will stalk and chase out
> "small" critters such as
> cats, etc. The yearling and adult
> Longhorns have very good distance
> eyesight and will even come up to
> fence and watch some animal (or
> other roadside activity) on the
> other side of fence. Longhorns
> historically are very good
> predator control animals while
> being gentle creatures to their
> "friends." They will
> also gather around calves if
> danger is present. Unless they
> were outnumbered significantly by
> a pack of wolves or mountain
> lions, don't think the predator(s)
> would stand much of a chance.
 
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Anonymous

I can't think of a single unwanted critter a field fence would keep out. Dogs either go over or crawl under field fence, deer & elk go over, mountain lions go over. We've had all of these unwanted critters in our pastures.

However, we do use field fence topped with 2 strands of barbed wire, mostly to keep calves in the pasture.
 
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Anonymous

Linda, I’ll go along with you. Field fence is primarily made for turning hogs or goats. We run five or six string barb wire on our outside fences. Goat wire with a couple of strings of barb wire is best, but considerably more expensive. Cris, whatever you do, don’t waste your money on Goucho or other skinny high-tensile trash. I hate that stuff. It’s razor sharp but it doesn’t last till the water gets hot.

As for predators, I don’t know of any type of pasture or field fence that will tun them. Even the choice deer leases and big game ranches that run high-fence all the way around have plenty of varmints and predators on them.

Bill, I’ve laughed out loud watching young steers chase jackrabbits. It is a sight to see. Coyotes and wolves run in packs but mountain lions don’t. They are loners most of the year.

We’ve got one around here at the moment. I’ve heard it once but not seen it. We had to put a calf down this year because of it. It’s hide was torn loose at the withers and peeled back to the flank on one side. I hated it but the calf was really hurting. His momma must have put up an admirable fight because you could tell she was tired and sore. I sure hope to get a shot at that cat one of these days.

Back to the subject of fencing, if you’re running a cross fence it’s nice to pick an area on a high place (where you won’t stick your pickup) and run the bottom wire higher than normal. When you’re caking cattle you can get on the opposite side from them and walk along the fence pouring each sack in a long line underneath. With the bottom string up high it doesn’t get in your way and the cows can get down on their knees and get their heads under to reach all the cake. It makes it nice to check them and look them over, having them all lined up. It’s certainly not a necessity, just something to think about if you’re planning to cross fence somewhere.

Craig-TX
 
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Anonymous

> Linda, I’ll go along with you.
> Field fence is primarily made for
> turning hogs or goats. We run five
> or six string barb wire on our
> outside fences. Goat wire with a
> couple of strings of barb wire is
> best, but considerably more
> expensive. Cris, whatever you do,
> don’t waste your money on Goucho
> or other skinny high-tensile
> trash. I hate that stuff. It’s
> razor sharp but it doesn’t last
> till the water gets hot.

> As for predators, I don’t know of
> any type of pasture or field fence
> that will tun them. Even the
> choice deer leases and big game
> ranches that run high-fence all
> the way around have plenty of
> varmints and predators on them.

> Bill, I’ve laughed out loud
> watching young steers chase
> jackrabbits. It is a sight to see.
> Coyotes and wolves run in packs
> but mountain lions don’t. They are
> loners most of the year.

> We’ve got one around here at the
> moment. I’ve heard it once but not
> seen it. We had to put a calf down
> this year because of it. It’s hide
> was torn loose at the withers and
> peeled back to the flank on one
> side. I hated it but the calf was
> really hurting. His momma must
> have put up an admirable fight
> because you could tell she was
> tired and sore. I sure hope to get
> a shot at that cat one of these
> days.

> Back to the subject of fencing, if
> you’re running a cross fence it’s
> nice to pick an area on a high
> place (where you won’t stick your
> pickup) and run the bottom wire
> higher than normal. When you’re
> caking cattle you can get on the
> opposite side from them and walk
> along the fence pouring each sack
> in a long line underneath. With
> the bottom string up high it
> doesn’t get in your way and the
> cows can get down on their knees
> and get their heads under to reach
> all the cake. It makes it nice to
> check them and look them over,
> having them all lined up. It’s
> certainly not a necessity, just
> something to think about if you’re
> planning to cross fence somewhere.

> Craig-TX

We are very fortunate here in Australia we don't have much that harms our livestock. Dingoes (similar to a Coyote) are probably the biggest nuisance they usually don't come out into open country much. Foxes can be a problem to lambs and sometimes a frail calf. Up north in the tropics crocodiles can be a problem with cattle drinking. We have the odd snakebite. Thank god we don't have Pumas,Grizzlies etc. Colin



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Anonymous

> We are very fortunate here in
> Australia we don't have much that
> harms our livestock. Dingoes
> (similar to a Coyote) are probably
> the biggest nuisance they usually
> don't come out into open country
> much. Foxes can be a problem to
> lambs and sometimes a frail calf.
> Up north in the tropics crocodiles
> can be a problem with cattle
> drinking. We have the odd
> snakebite. Thank god we don't have
> Pumas,Grizzlies etc. Colin

Over the twenty years I have been building fence and raising cattle I have used nothing but five strands of wire. I changed from barbed to high tensel wire with power about ten years ago and have never had a calf or cow get out. I use a brace system called Pust-A-Post to make my corners and I pull over 1/4 mile of five strand 12.5 gage wire. I have to go to Missouri to get it at the MFA stores there. It sure is fast and easy to use. It is worth the trip.

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Anonymous

here in NE ohio we get 45" rain /yr, steel posts (green ones) only last half as long as treated wood. Fed hiway spec galvinized steel posts last as long but are more money than treated wood. Don't mess with woven, elect. hi tensil is wonderful.
 

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