Paddock/Pasture Improvement

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Anonymous

We are in final stages of re-fencing two small sub-pasture areas totaling about 11 acres. These "paddocks" are to be used to rotate selected animals while our other pasture areas are recovering and to keep "wild" weeds and other grasses eaten down. Since we're into a registered breeding operation with several small different pedigree groups, this is the way we manage our stock. Now some questions for those producers in Texas, especially.

First, I have received absolutely no positive response from the TAEX people or from the Range Management people at Texas A & M University, even after I sent them photos of our pastures. None of the local/area Extension people are apparently interested in or willing to do a site visit....duh....guess they're too interested in 4-H or Home Canning activities...lol.

Anyway, we have a better than average stand of native bermudagreass on our property. These "new" pasture areas have less than average stand of good grass. I want to overseed next spring (when weather warms up for sowing warm-season grasses) with bermuda. [Note: we mowed down our weeds in these pasture areas recently and turned some of cattle in for grazing]. I had prefer not to use herbicides in the spring. Our weeds are primarily Russian Thistle (tumbleweeds), a small yellow flowered weed, a 3-4' tall stiff stemmed white (as well as yellow) flowering weed, and some other minor weeds which seem to be annuals. These weeds probably (in season) cover about 50% of the 2 sub-pastures.

Now to the point: What are our chances of broadcast overseeding bermuda in late spring at 2X the normal rate and getting a reasonable start on more bermuda? Also, we plan to fertilize again in late spring. Due to very sandy conditions in the Texas Panhandle region, I do not want to till or disturb the soil any more than absolutely necessary due to wind erosion problems around here.

Will appreciate any comments from the grass experts on this board as well as any suggestions you might have.

Thanks, Bill.



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A

Anonymous

> We are in final stages of
> re-fencing two small sub-pasture
> areas totaling about 11 acres.
> These "paddocks" are to
> be used to rotate selected animals
> while our other pasture areas are
> recovering and to keep
> "wild" weeds and other
> grasses eaten down. Since we're
> into a registered breeding
> operation with several small
> different pedigree groups, this is
> the way we manage our stock. Now
> some questions for those producers
> in Texas, especially.

> First, I have received absolutely
> no positive response from the TAEX
> people or from the Range
> Management people at Texas A &
> M University, even after I sent
> them photos of our pastures. None
> of the local/area Extension people
> are apparently interested in or
> willing to do a site
> visit....duh....guess they're too
> interested in 4-H or Home Canning
> activities...lol.

> Anyway, we have a better than
> average stand of native
> bermudagreass on our property.
> These "new" pasture
> areas have less than average stand
> of good grass. I want to overseed
> next spring (when weather warms up
> for sowing warm-season grasses)
> with bermuda. [Note: we mowed down
> our weeds in these pasture areas
> recently and turned some of cattle
> in for grazing]. I had prefer not
> to use herbicides in the spring.
> Our weeds are primarily Russian
> Thistle (tumbleweeds), a small
> yellow flowered weed, a 3-4' tall
> stiff stemmed white (as well as
> yellow) flowering weed, and some
> other minor weeds which seem to be
> annuals. These weeds probably (in
> season) cover about 50% of the 2
> sub-pastures.

> Now to the point: What are our
> chances of broadcast overseeding
> bermuda in late spring at 2X the
> normal rate and getting a
> reasonable start on more bermuda?
> Also, we plan to fertilize again
> in late spring. Due to very sandy
> conditions in the Texas Panhandle
> region, I do not want to till or
> disturb the soil any more than
> absolutely necessary due to wind
> erosion problems around here.

> Will appreciate any comments from
> the grass experts on this board as
> well as any suggestions you might
> have.

> Thanks, Bill.

I don't have any pasture advice, but I had a thought. If the county agents neglects us adults to the effect of helping and being involved with kids through the 4h program, I would say there is not a finer thing for them to do as too many of our kids nowdays lack any kind of positive influence in their lives. As a 4h volunteer leader, I know how much time this takes for the county agents and applaud them for putting the kids first because they will be the beef producers of tomorrow not to mention all the other areas of agriculture. Hope you have good luck with your pastures, but would ask that you give this some thought.

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A

Anonymous

Appreciate and respect your comments David about the 4-H Programs. On the flip side, if the County Agents aren't available (or want to) address the concerns of the landowners and livestock people, then perhaps they need to be renamed "4-H Agents".

In the past 30 years or so there has been especially a lot of public and media emphasis on "our children" and parents' only concern is to make life easier and create a better world for them (of course, this is nothing wrong with this notion). This is fine. However, I think the general public has slightly lost sight of the obvious fact that if it weren't for their parents, the children wouldn't be here. Parents must, for care, protection, and economic reasons, be first and the children second in the nature of things. The same is true of non-human animals. Without the parents being first, most offspring would be doomed to survive on their own.

I have a wonderful adult daughter and 3 grandchildren. However, if it weren't for me (and my ex-wife) none of them would exist...and their "future" would be a non-issue.

Food for thought....

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A

Anonymous

> Appreciate and respect your
> comments David about the 4-H
> Programs. On the flip side, if the
> County Agents aren't available (or
> want to) address the concerns of
> the landowners and livestock
> people, then perhaps they need to
> be renamed "4-H Agents".

> In the past 30 years or so there
> has been especially a lot of
> public and media emphasis on
> "our children" and
> parents' only concern is to make
> life easier and create a better
> world for them (of course, this is
> nothing wrong with this notion).
> This is fine. However, I think the
> general public has slightly lost
> sight of the obvious fact that if
> it weren't for their parents, the
> children wouldn't be here. Parents
> must, for care, protection, and
> economic reasons, be first and the
> children second in the nature of
> things. The same is true of
> non-human animals. Without the
> parents being first, most
> offspring would be doomed to
> survive on their own.

> I have a wonderful adult daughter
> and 3 grandchildren. However, if
> it weren't for me (and my ex-wife)
> none of them would exist...and
> their "future" would be
> a non-issue.

> Food for thought....

Appreciate your comments. Its good to be able to rub against each other a little sometimes and not get angry or smart with each other the way I have seen some postings on this board. Variety makes the world go round. Keep up the good comments. Only posted the preceding to express an opinion not to anger anyone. We all need something for our brains to feed on. By the way, my boys are 12 and 9, so you can see where I'm coming from with the 4h thing.

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OP
A

Anonymous

> We are in final stages of
> re-fencing two small sub-pasture
> areas totaling about 11 acres.
> These "paddocks" are to
> be used to rotate selected animals
> while our other pasture areas are
> recovering and to keep
> "wild" weeds and other
> grasses eaten down. Since we're
> into a registered breeding
> operation with several small
> different pedigree groups, this is
> the way we manage our stock. Now
> some questions for those producers
> in Texas, especially.

> First, I have received absolutely
> no positive response from the TAEX
> people or from the Range
> Management people at Texas A &
> M University, even after I sent
> them photos of our pastures. None
> of the local/area Extension people
> are apparently interested in or
> willing to do a site
> visit....duh....guess they're too
> interested in 4-H or Home Canning
> activities...lol.

> Anyway, we have a better than
> average stand of native
> bermudagreass on our property.
> These "new" pasture
> areas have less than average stand
> of good grass. I want to overseed
> next spring (when weather warms up
> for sowing warm-season grasses)
> with bermuda. [Note: we mowed down
> our weeds in these pasture areas
> recently and turned some of cattle
> in for grazing]. I had prefer not
> to use herbicides in the spring.
> Our weeds are primarily Russian
> Thistle (tumbleweeds), a small
> yellow flowered weed, a 3-4' tall
> stiff stemmed white (as well as
> yellow) flowering weed, and some
> other minor weeds which seem to be
> annuals. These weeds probably (in
> season) cover about 50% of the 2
> sub-pastures.

> Now to the point: What are our
> chances of broadcast overseeding
> bermuda in late spring at 2X the
> normal rate and getting a
> reasonable start on more bermuda?
> Also, we plan to fertilize again
> in late spring. Due to very sandy
> conditions in the Texas Panhandle
> region, I do not want to till or
> disturb the soil any more than
> absolutely necessary due to wind
> erosion problems around here. Bill, you probably have a plan in mind that will best suit your situation. I live in sandy country of central Texas and fully understand your concerns. I'll give you something else to consider, not that this may be THE way to establish your grass. I think you will have a tuff time getting grass established from seed with competition from the weed pests you mentioned, especially thistle, without some chemical control. I respect your position to keep their use to a minimum. Consider tilling in strips, maybe disturbing less than 50% of the total soil, and if possible using bermuda sprigs if digging and sprigging is an option. If you are in the panhandle of Texas using 24-D to stunt maybe not kill the weeds might be an option if drift to cotton or other susceptible plants is not an issue. Other products are available and their effectiveness on target weeds and timing of application should be looked at. Sprigs should survive any moving sand which should be minimal and adverse weather conditions such as lack of moisture following sprigging. Don't know if this is appropriate for your particular situation. I have done this with success.

> Will appreciate any comments from
> the grass experts on this board as
> well as any suggestions you might
> have.

> Thanks, Bill.



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A

Anonymous

other knowledgeable folks you might want to contact are your local seed dealers (keep in mind they may try to push their brand of seed) or your local feed store owner or dealer. these people may also know what will work best in your area and what has worked for others.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> other knowledgeable folks you
> might want to contact are your
> local seed dealers (keep in mind
> they may try to push their brand
> of seed) or your local feed store
> owner or dealer. these people may
> also know what will work best in
> your area and what has worked for
> others.

You might contact your County NRCS for assistance if your extension people won't respond. If you do seed, you might drag the area with a chain harrow to scratch the soil so the seed can make contact, then drag it with a tire drag to cover the seed. That way you won't distrub the soil very much and it will not hurt the existing grass. Good Luck



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