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Other black breeds

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Frankie

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I'm curious as to how other black breeds are handling the genetic disorders that are showing up in Angus. If you're using a black Simmental, Limmi or Maine bull, do you know anything about the Angus bloodlines in him?
 

dun

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Some Red ANgus also have some of the same defects. The Red Angus site has animals that are carriers and links back to the angus associations defect page
A heifer I was really interested in in the coming sale this week-end is labeled as being a osteopetrosis carrier. Bet she goes cheap.
 
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Frankie

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sooknortex":39qktgd1 said:
Sounds like an advertisement for Charolais or Herefords to me.

How is the AHA handling Idiopathic Epilepsy?

Is the Charolais Assn going to test for AM?
 
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Frankie

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sooknortex":3925q90w said:
Seems to have effected much less animals. Get a test and your animal is listed as IEF if he does not have the recessive.

Oh? How many have been affected or just not tested?

When is AAA coming out with Certified Curly Beef? Certified Fawn Beef? Certified Hydro Beef?

LOL

About the time you grow up.


On a side note, do you mean to tell me that Gardiner's never had any of these problems in their herd? What happened to those animals? Were they submitted for tests?

The test for curly calf has only been available within the last few months. A bit difficult for even people as smart and honest as Gardiners to test before then.

If Gardiners had been up front years ago, a lot of this could have probably been avoided.

I just find it too incredible to believe that with their breeding program they never had these problem calves years ago. Precision is over 20 years old isn't he? They must be the luckiest people alive to have had all these recessive gene problems and never have had an affected calf.

Oh maybe now they are submitting but what about 8-10 years ago when these funny calves came out?

I think you'd better be careful calling a reputable breeding operation like Gardiner dishonest out here on a public discussion board.

Seems like they had a $6 million sale earlier this month. I guess somebody thinks their program is worth some $$$$.
 
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Frankie

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Red Bull Breeder":1rkcmzys said:
Don't have a problem with AM or fawn calf Frankie real Limi's don't have any Angus in them.

I understand. When we moved back home (1983), there were red Limousin cattle all over the place. I especially liked the bulls. But after listening to some kollege kowboys debate whether Limousin or Simmental was the easier pull on heifers, we decided to go with an Angus bull on our first cattle.
 

brandonm_13

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Sounds like it's just a problem with Angus crossbreeds, as most other breeds aren't black when they're fullbloods. :nod:
 

KNERSIE

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Frankie":3sgmmfi4 said:
Red Bull Breeder":3sgmmfi4 said:
Don't have a problem with AM or fawn calf Frankie real Limi's don't have any Angus in them.

I understand. When we moved back home (1983), there were red Limousin cattle all over the place. I especially liked the bulls. But after listening to some kollege kowboys debate whether Limousin or Simmental was the easier pull on heifers, we decided to go with an Angus bull on our first cattle.

That gave me a good chuckle, good comeback there, Frankie! :clap: :lol:

Actually limousins aren't hard calvers, of the major continental breeds they are probably the easiest calving (apart from Salers, off course ;-) )
 

VanC

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Workinonit Farm":i2wa8e5k said:
HerefordSire":i2wa8e5k said:
I wonder who is going to get the last word in. :dunce: :dunce: :dunce:

Whichever moderator is the one to lock it.

Katherine

What a shame if it comes to that. Frankie and I have had our differences, and likely will again, but she aked a serious question, and a dam good one at that. No reason for her to get jumped on like she was.
 

redluv

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sooknortex":l5fos39f said:
On a side note, do you mean to tell me that Gardiner's never had any of these problems in their herd? What happened to those animals? Were they submitted for tests?

If Gardiners had been up front years ago, a lot of this could have probably been avoided.

I just find it too incredible to believe that with their breeding program they never had these problem calves years ago. Precision is over 20 years old isn't he? They must be the luckiest people alive to have had all these recessive gene problems and never have had an affected calf.

Oh maybe now they are submitting but what about 8-10 years ago when these funny calves came out?
I've been doing some research on AM for my Animal Breeding paper, and this is kind of a summary of what I've read:
Gardiners' had an AM calf in the early 1990s and took it to Kansas State University to get it tested (the geneticist said it could be AM but wasn't likely). After that they raised 27,000 or some huge number of calves, and of those, they had 11-or something around that- that had the same defect as the 1st. The vets and researchers at the time said it could be environmental or disease related. Then when the 50 or whatever calves that got reported to the AAA in 2008 got the ball rolling to see whether or not it was genetically related.
 

DOC HARRIS

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Some of you guys have "The Shootout at the OK Corral" down pretty pat! :clap: :clap: :clap: :tiphat:

DOC HARRIS
 

Red Bull Breeder

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Well i replied to Frankies question with a honest reply real Limi's don't have those problems. Not the bulls fault them little pinchassed cows couldn't pass more than a tomcat.
 

ANAZAZI

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Red Bull Breeder":2033s9ap said:
Well i replied to Frankies question with a honest reply real Limi's don't have those problems. Not the bulls fault them little pinchassed cows couldn't pass more than a tomcat.

Where I live one can run limousin with heifers without pulling calves. My friend however had twenty angus and baldie heifers bred to simmenthal. Two were open so eighteen remained. He got one of them to calve without assistance and he pulled at all the others and still lost nine calves and two cows. Twentytwo pecent cow loss and fifty percent calf loss is what I call train wreck. The live calves all very nice, eight heifers and one bull. He has also bought another herd charolais bred to angus all calved unassisted and he lost like ten percent.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Frankie - back to the original question. the American Simmental Assn. tests the top 50 bulls each year for all known genetic defects that have tests available. Also, if a producer uses a certain breed to upgrade or get 1/2 bloods, the calf has to be tested before registration.
 
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Frankie

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Thanks, Jeanne and Dun. That was what I was looking for. And VanC, too.
 

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