Orchard Grass

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highvoltagecattleco

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Your climate in Maine is probably much like us in Western Washington. We don't get the snow, but we dont get very hot. I have Orchard grass that we bale in late June, early July. Makes great hay and the cows prefer it over any other grass. My pasture is OG and clover. It doesn't come up as quick in the spring as I would like. I overseed with Oats in the fall so there is more forage in the spring.
 

lukem86

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OG seed looks very expensive this year... saw some in a catalog for close to $3.75/lb... happy i got my OG pasture in this past year...
 

dyates

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never tried interseeding into bluegrass, but if the OG grows, it will more than likely smother the bluegrass. Around here, bluegrass has the lowest yields of any grass and will be outcompeted by anything if not grown in pure stands. Although we are called the "bluegrass state" the only people I know of who use bluegrass are the horsefarms and landscapers.
As for orchardgrass, I have found it to do poorly under continuous grazing, particularly when mixed with other grasses. Our cattle prefer the OG by a mile and will graze it into the dirt before they eat anything else. It does well under rotational grazing.
 

dun

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dyates":1ayh4g4d said:
never tried interseeding into bluegrass, but if the OG grows, it will more than likely smother the bluegrass. Around here, bluegrass has the lowest yields of any grass and will be outcompeted by anything if not grown in pure stands. Although we are called the "bluegrass state" the only people I know of who use bluegrass are the horsefarms and landscapers.
As for orchardgrass, I have found it to do poorly under continuous grazing, particularly when mixed with other grasses. Our cattle prefer the OG by a mile and will graze it into the dirt before they eat anything else. It does well under rotational grazing.

There is probably only one grass that won;t be hurt or if it's will recover from continuous grazing.
 

msscamp

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dun":3po67hnx said:
dyates":3po67hnx said:
never tried interseeding into bluegrass, but if the OG grows, it will more than likely smother the bluegrass. Around here, bluegrass has the lowest yields of any grass and will be outcompeted by anything if not grown in pure stands. Although we are called the "bluegrass state" the only people I know of who use bluegrass are the horsefarms and landscapers.
As for orchardgrass, I have found it to do poorly under continuous grazing, particularly when mixed with other grasses. Our cattle prefer the OG by a mile and will graze it into the dirt before they eat anything else. It does well under rotational grazing.

There is probably only one grass that won;t be hurt or if it's will recover from continuous grazing.

What grass is that?
 

dun

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msscamp":32zxvp99 said:
dun":32zxvp99 said:
dyates":32zxvp99 said:
never tried interseeding into bluegrass, but if the OG grows, it will more than likely smother the bluegrass. Around here, bluegrass has the lowest yields of any grass and will be outcompeted by anything if not grown in pure stands. Although we are called the "bluegrass state" the only people I know of who use bluegrass are the horsefarms and landscapers.
As for orchardgrass, I have found it to do poorly under continuous grazing, particularly when mixed with other grasses. Our cattle prefer the OG by a mile and will graze it into the dirt before they eat anything else. It does well under rotational grazing.

There is probably only one grass that won;t be hurt or if it's will recover from continuous grazing.

What grass is that?

Endophyte infected fescue
 

msscamp

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dun":2x37gjyi said:
msscamp":2x37gjyi said:
dun":2x37gjyi said:
dyates":2x37gjyi said:
never tried interseeding into bluegrass, but if the OG grows, it will more than likely smother the bluegrass. Around here, bluegrass has the lowest yields of any grass and will be outcompeted by anything if not grown in pure stands. Although we are called the "bluegrass state" the only people I know of who use bluegrass are the horsefarms and landscapers.
As for orchardgrass, I have found it to do poorly under continuous grazing, particularly when mixed with other grasses. Our cattle prefer the OG by a mile and will graze it into the dirt before they eat anything else. It does well under rotational grazing.

There is probably only one grass that won;t be hurt or if it's will recover from continuous grazing.

What grass is that?

Endophyte infected fescue

I figured fescue would be at least part of the answer, didn't figure on the endophyte part, though. Thanks!
 

csangus

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I really like OG hay.It is easy to dry for dry hay and yields are pretty good.It takes a year for it to really start yielding well.They say when grazing a hay type OG be sure to leave a 3-4" stubble or it won't last more than a few years.I would use the newer varieties from companies like barenbrug.They have several varieties that range in maturity from early to late.The late varieties are the ones you use w/alfalfa.
 

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