One for Jason

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Anonymous

A while back I received input from you about a Angus bull calf with a birth weight of 107 lb. His sire is GDAR SVF Traveler 234D, and his Dam is Lemmon Blackbird 5034.

My question is about feeding grain. Most people say that we should be feeding grain, in addition to their acces (at present) to unlimited green grass, albeit it is E+ fescue, in order to maintain a gain of 2.5 -3.0 lb per day. This calf weaned at 5 1/2 months and is growing at a rate of 3.5 lb per day and weighs 643 lb on grass alone (no grain).

Do we need to give him grain at this point or just keep a watch on weights and add as needed to maintain the required weight gains?

Thanks,

Bill
 
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Anonymous

I told you them big calves grow!

At 3.5 pounds, he doesn't need to grow any faster. Keep an eye on the grass situation and when it starts to dry off or if you need to get the calf ready for a sale, introduce a protien suppliment. Green grass is the best feed cattle can have, grain is only needed when you have to substitute poor forage for grass.

The endophyte issue needs to be watched as well. I don't know how much you can get away with, but I wouldn't think adding grain to his diet with E would be a good idea.

Jason Trowbridge Southern Angus Farms Alberta Canada

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

There are mineral supplements that contain CTC which helps counteract some of the endophyte side effects. If you can keep the grass vegative and not seeding that helps, or clip the paddock to remove the seed heads before turning him in.

dunmovin farms

> I told you them big calves grow!

> At 3.5 pounds, he doesn't need to
> grow any faster. Keep an eye on
> the grass situation and when it
> starts to dry off or if you need
> to get the calf ready for a sale,
> introduce a protien suppliment.
> Green grass is the best feed
> cattle can have, grain is only
> needed when you have to substitute
> poor forage for grass.

> The endophyte issue needs to be
> watched as well. I don't know how
> much you can get away with, but I
> wouldn't think adding grain to his
> diet with E would be a good idea.

> Jason Trowbridge Southern Angus
> Farms Alberta Canada
 
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Anonymous

Hate to disagree Dun, you are mostly right on the money. But CTC won't counter the effects of endophyte infected fescue. The endophyte causes the blood vessels to constrict leading to raised temp, poor digestion, poor circulation causing drop of tail switch tips of ears, etc. Poor circulation also hampers shedding of winter hair.

If an animal has some kind of chronic or low grade infection the endophyte related temperature increase will compound the problem and CTC will help clear up infections leaving the animal with only the endophyte problem to deal with.

Dealing with Fescue by clipping seed heads as you said is very effective. Also graze fescue in the spring and fall and try to find a non-fescue pasture in the hottest part of the summer. If your cattle have to be on Fescue in the heat, make sure they have a way to cool off.

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

Around here they tout CTC as a help with the endophyte. Never could figure out why but that's what the feed mills claim. Glad you disagreed, it gives me more stuff the research.

dunmovin farms

> Hate to disagree Dun, you are
> mostly right on the money. But CTC
> won't counter the effects of
> endophyte infected fescue. The
> endophyte causes the blood vessels
> to constrict leading to raised
> temp, poor digestion, poor
> circulation causing drop of tail
> switch tips of ears, etc. Poor
> circulation also hampers shedding
> of winter hair.

> If an animal has some kind of
> chronic or low grade infection the
> endophyte related temperature
> increase will compound the problem
> and CTC will help clear up
> infections leaving the animal with
> only the endophyte problem to deal
> with.

> Dealing with Fescue by clipping
> seed heads as you said is very
> effective. Also graze fescue in
> the spring and fall and try to
> find a non-fescue pasture in the
> hottest part of the summer. If
> your cattle have to be on Fescue
> in the heat, make sure they have a
> way to cool off.
 
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Anonymous

After doing some research, it serms that while cattle are on endophyte infected pasture, CTC helps with ADG, and prevention of foot rot and pinkeye. I couldn't really find out why/how, just that it does. Anybody have more information on the subject?

dunmovin farms

> Around here they tout CTC as a
> help with the endophyte. Never
> could figure out why but that's
> what the feed mills claim. Glad
> you disagreed, it gives me more
> stuff the research.

> dunmovin farms
 

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