Older Cows

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Arancher

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I hear of cattleman culling 7,8 yr. old cows because of age. If a cow is 10 to 12 yrs old and still in good frame score (5 to 6) why get rid of her. She is still one of my best calf moma and rebreeds within 45 days.
 

Frankie

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Arancher":5uzzndsb said:
I hear of cattleman culling 7,8 yr. old cows because of age. If a cow is 10 to 12 yrs old and still in good frame score (5 to 6) why get rid of her. She is still one of my best calf moma and rebreeds within 45 days.

If you're trying to improve your cow herd, culling older cows and keeping better heifers would be the way to go. But as long as the cow produces a calf you're happy with on a regular basis, why cull her?
 
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Anonymous

Arancher":24w0layy said:
I hear of cattleman culling 7,8 yr. old cows because of age. If a cow is 10 to 12 yrs old and still in good frame score (5 to 6) why get rid of her. She is still one of my best calf moma and rebreeds within 45 days.

Now thats not an old cow.I have had cows that produced like clockwork to 14 or 15
 

TheBullLady

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A younger cull cow will bring more at the auction barn than a 10+ year old. You have to weigh the options.. cull young and get more $$ at the sale, or hold on to the older cow and make the $$ on the additional calves she'll raise
 

dun

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The catch with the whole age thing is that some cows are old at 4-5, others are young at 12. It depends on the genetics and managment as to how old an old cow is.

dun


Arancher":2c9qhxy6 said:
I hear of cattleman culling 7,8 yr. old cows because of age. If a cow is 10 to 12 yrs old and still in good frame score (5 to 6) why get rid of her. She is still one of my best calf moma and rebreeds within 45 days.
 

cherokeeruby

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Genetics is a large part of longevity of a cow. The dam of the cow pictured in this avatar is 13 and still as fleshy and fertile as her daughter.

Most of our most productive cows are over 10.

We prefer to keep heifers out of this kind of cow.
 

dun

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Not wanting to sound snotty, but if your most productive cows are over 10, what has happened to the genetics of your heifers?

dun



cherokeeruby":2skk1npo said:
Genetics is a large part of longevity of a cow. The dam of the cow pictured in this avatar is 13 and still as fleshy and fertile as her daughter.

Most of our most productive cows are over 10.

We prefer to keep heifers out of this kind of cow.
 

cherokeeruby

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Productive in the sense that they are still producing calves along with their daughters and granddaughters. If we look at our herd the best cows go back to these older cows.

We have great-grand dams still producing and have great expectations of their great granddaughters. Does this make any sense? Don't know how else to explain it.

dun":21wru3qp said:
Not wanting to sound snotty, but if your most productive cows are over 10, what has happened to the genetics of your heifers?

dun



cherokeeruby":21wru3qp said:
Genetics is a large part of longevity of a cow. The dam of the cow pictured in this avatar is 13 and still as fleshy and fertile as her daughter.

Most of our most productive cows are over 10.

We prefer to keep heifers out of this kind of cow.
 

dun

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Makes sense, but one would expect the heifers from the older cows to be more profitable, i.e. wean heavier calves with less feed intake, then the older cows.

dun


cherokeeruby":14he4um3 said:
Productive in the sense that they are still producing calves along with their daughters and granddaughters. If we look at our herd the best cows go back to these older cows.

We have great-grand dams still producing and have great expectations of their great granddaughters. Does this make any sense? Don't know how else to explain it.

dun":14he4um3 said:
Not wanting to sound snotty, but if your most productive cows are over 10, what has happened to the genetics of your heifers?

dun



cherokeeruby":14he4um3 said:
Genetics is a large part of longevity of a cow. The dam of the cow pictured in this avatar is 13 and still as fleshy and fertile as her daughter.

Most of our most productive cows are over 10.

We prefer to keep heifers out of this kind of cow.
 

cherokeeruby

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Very good point. Now that we are raising F-1's out of these Registered cows we will start looking for that. The less feed intake has always been their lot in life. The are on an all you can find diet with hay in the winter and a trace mineral salt block.

Weaning weights are good considering their diets. Bulls at 205 days would average around 550 with a few above 600 and the heifers a little less.

dun":1vn7omx2 said:
Makes sense, but one would expect the heifers from the older cows to be more profitable, i.e. wean heavier calves with less feed intake, then the older cows.

dun


cherokeeruby":1vn7omx2 said:
Productive in the sense that they are still producing calves along with their daughters and granddaughters. If we look at our herd the best cows go back to these older cows.

We have great-grand dams still producing and have great expectations of their great granddaughters. Does this make any sense? Don't know how else to explain it.

dun":1vn7omx2 said:
Not wanting to sound snotty, but if your most productive cows are over 10, what has happened to the genetics of your heifers?

dun



cherokeeruby":1vn7omx2 said:
Genetics is a large part of longevity of a cow. The dam of the cow pictured in this avatar is 13 and still as fleshy and fertile as her daughter.

Most of our most productive cows are over 10.

We prefer to keep heifers out of this kind of cow.
 

dun

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One needs to know their own particular forage base. We don't chase hgigher and higher weaning weights. A heifer weaning a 500 lb calf and cows near 600 works just fine for us. Since most of our cows run around 1000-1100 lbs and carry a BCS of 5.5-6 we're satisfied also. We're working now toward more consistant carcass grade. We're running around the mid to high choice, but every once in a while a select will creep in. YG 2's with an ocasional 3. Gotta get rid of those selects and 3.

dun


cherokeeruby":1l8v6i7p said:
Very good point. Now that we are raising F-1's out of these Registered cows we will start looking for that. The less feed intake has always been their lot in life. The are on an all you can find diet with hay in the winter and a trace mineral salt block.

Weaning weights are good considering their diets. Bulls at 205 days would average around 550 with a few above 600 and the heifers a little less.
 
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