Newly orphaned calf

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Anonymous

A neighbor's cow died somewhat unexpectedly on Sunday and I was not able to catch her calf before I had to leave. The neighbor is an old man that can only get around with a cane. The calf looked to be in good physical condition on Sunday evening but is only about 5 and a half weeks old per my neighbor. There is no green grass at this time of the year and cattle are being fed hay. Can any of you experienced cattle men or women tell me if you think the calf of that age is old enough to make it on it's own?

I rather doubt that it can survive on its own at that young age, but maybe it can sneak a meal or two from some other "kind and generous" cow. I'm going back there on Wed. evening and if the calf is still alive and I can catch it then I'll try to take it to a sale barn or to somebody that has a wet nurse cow or wants to try bottle feeding, unless you all think it can make it on its own.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> A neighbor's cow died somewhat
> unexpectedly on Sunday and I was
> not able to catch her calf before
> I had to leave. The neighbor is an
> old man that can only get around
> with a cane. The calf looked to be
> in good physical condition on
> Sunday evening but is only about 5
> and a half weeks old per my
> neighbor. There is no green grass
> at this time of the year and
> cattle are being fed hay. Can any
> of you experienced cattle men or
> women tell me if you think the
> calf of that age is old enough to
> make it on it's own?

> I rather doubt that it can survive
> on its own at that young age, but
> maybe it can sneak a meal or two
> from some other "kind and
> generous" cow. I'm going back
> there on Wed. evening and if the
> calf is still alive and I can
> catch it then I'll try to take it
> to a sale barn or to somebody that
> has a wet nurse cow or wants to
> try bottle feeding, unless you all
> think it can make it on its own.

I have a steer that was orphaned at 4 weeks. He was doing well on hay and grain. Fortunately, my neighbor had a Jersey cow that decided she wanted a calf and hopped the fence to take him. Terri



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Anonymous

He'll live but he'll never amount to anything, he'll always be doggy looking. He'd be a pain in the ass to try to get on a bottle at his age anyway. The problem with a calf that young is that they don't have enough and the right kind of rumen bacteria yet to effectively digest fiber. Personally I'd sell it if i could and cut my losses and headaches.

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