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New Perimeter Fence

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callmefence

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simme said:
RobD said:
When pulling tension on the wires, I assume this is done from one stiffener post to the next, and then you attached the wire to T-posts in between?

And thank you all for the replys.

The stiffener posts every 100 feet are single posts with no bracing. Their purpose is to support the fence vertically and hopefully prevent it from being pushed over perpendicular to the direction of the fence. You do not stretch to these posts. You install brace posts at the beginning and the end of a run, where there is a major change in direction (like 90 degrees) or every 1000 feet or so on a very long straight run. These consist of two posts set deep in the ground 8-10 feet apart with a horizontal post between them with a diagonal wire/cable pulling them toward the end of the run. If you are using pipe, they will be welded together as one unit and the horizontal member may be diagonal. This setup braces the end post to make it much stronger so that you can stretch the wire very tight. All the tightness is supported by these braces on the ends. The t-posts and stiffener post just hold the fence up and keep in in line. Install the brace posts, stretch a wire near the ground from the brace posts at one end of the run to the brace posts at the other end of the run. This establishes the straight line. Install the stiffener posts every 100 feet. Install/stretch the wire between the braces and secure on each end. Then, install the t-posts and secure the wire to the stiffener posts and t-posts.

Here is a set of videos that show the basics for fixed knot wire. Sure you can find others that fit your installation.
http://staytuff.com/StepsChecklist.asp

The keys to a good fence:

Strong/big posts on the ends set deep.
Pull the wire tight and then some more.
Tie/secure the wire at the ends so that is stays tight.

Remember the weakest item determines the strength of the fence. You have to do all three of these.

Mr. Fence's motto - "If it ain't tight, it ain't right". It will never be tighter than the day you install it.

If you install a fence along a road in a curve, be prepared to repair it. You can keep the animals in, but hard to keep the cars out.

I have built a few fences. My son builds fences full time. It looks easy in the video. Most fencing videos are done in ideal conditions. It can be hard work. Hope you don't have a lot of rock.

Very good post.

And you don't have to call me mr. Mister , the whole world calls me fence..........
 

Lucky

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I’d go with Double H braces at every corner and I would terminate at the ends and not wrap. Drive brace post at least 48” deep and put a 8’-10’ post between the brace post. This will give you a double H that is 16-20 foot long. Set t post 10’ apart with a metal line post every 7th post. Stretch the wire as tight as you can. It’s all easy. Every time I’ve tried to wrap a post to make even the slightest bend in fence the fence has gotten loose after a few years, could be my ground though.
 
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RobD

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Just thought of this, but we had a fire go through this summer and it left behind a ton of 4" or so trees that appear to be dead now. There are plenty to attach fencing to and it would save a ton of money on T-posts. Is there any reason I shouldn't do this where the tree is sturdy? I was thinking I should just cut it off a foot or so above the last strand.
 

simme

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Just thought of this, but we had a fire go through this summer and it left behind a ton of 4" or so trees that appear to be dead now. There are plenty to attach fencing to and it would save a ton of money on T-posts. Is there any reason I shouldn't do this where the tree is sturdy? I was thinking I should just cut it off a foot or so above the last strand.
Lots of issues using a live tree as a "post". I would never use a dead tree as a post. It is dead and will rot and break over time. You will be left with wire and no posts. At least that is how it would work in my area.
I assume that these dead trees are not in a straight line. Zig-zag fencing is also not a good idea in my opinion. Just depends on how good of a fence you need and how long you want it to last.
 

Lee VanRoss

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A lot of good and interesting advice here. That said, I will just add one rule of thumb.
"Any fence that will hold water will hold a goat."
 

Katpau

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RobD
I am in southern Oregon, and we replaced perimeter fencing on 925 acres that is perhaps similar to yours. In many areas we had to carry heavy posts up steep inclines by hand for long distances. I understand what you're saying about reducing the amount of wood. We only put wood where the fence changed angles, either in direction or elevation. We use 5-6 inch pressure treated posts in most locations, and try to use as few as possible. We did cement them all in, so we bought the lighter 60 pound bags of concrete. Where the fence was built in timber and on an uphill slope, we got by with just 5 strands, but anywhere we thought it was likely that cattle might attempt to reach through or over, we went with 6 strands. We had learned from our earlier fence building that if it were at all possible to squeeze a head through or reach over it, the cattle would do so, and end up pushing wires apart or leaning the fence over. We now make sure the wires are close enough together that they can't get their head through or under the lowest wire. We also make sure the top wire is high enough off the ground that they can't get their head up over the top. Running another strand now will save you a lot of work in the future.

I believe someone suggested clearing a perimeter, so you can get in there with equipment. If your place is anything like ours that would be an expensive and in many places impossible option. We crawled up to some places on our hands and knees, dragging or pushing supplies. I often wonder how the ranchers who originally fenced this did it. I imagine they used pack horses. We left some of the most difficult areas unfenced since it was mostly timber with little grazing.
 

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