New here, question about a wild calf

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farmerjan

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One suggestion. I raise a bunch of jersey crosses, some bottle fed and some on nurse cows. One thing I tell ANYONE who wants a calf to be tame but understand who is boss..... DO NOT approach or try to push away or do anything from the front..... face to face. Always work from the side, the neck area, shoulder area. I also do not "bottle feed" directly in front of them. I stand to the side, so the calf has to reach around a little. More natural to get the bend in the neck when they are little and then they don't get milk down the wrong "pipe". But as far as not butting, pushing, etc., halter training and then lead while walking alongside. I will hit them on the nose real sharp and hard, if they get to pushing too much with their head, and say NO real loud and sharp. We have some heifers, now cows, that were "hand raised, and they are pretty much pets, but I make sure I am to their side when I scratch or rub them. Vet can do a dehorn while they are very small also when they are there.... Saves them from figuring out that they can get their way in the feeders etc and become bullies towards other calves.
 
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Annaaa

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farmerjan said:
One suggestion. I raise a bunch of jersey crosses, some bottle fed and some on nurse cows. One thing I tell ANYONE who wants a calf to be tame but understand who is boss..... DO NOT approach or try to push away or do anything from the front..... face to face. Always work from the side, the neck area, shoulder area. I also do not "bottle feed" directly in front of them. I stand to the side, so the calf has to reach around a little. More natural to get the bend in the neck when they are little and then they don't get milk down the wrong "pipe". But as far as not butting, pushing, etc., halter training and then lead while walking alongside. I will hit them on the nose real sharp and hard, if they get to pushing too much with their head, and say NO real loud and sharp. We have some heifers, now cows, that were "hand raised, and they are pretty much pets, but I make sure I am to their side when I scratch or rub them. Vet can do a dehorn while they are very small also when they are there.... Saves them from figuring out that they can get their way in the feeders etc and become bullies towards other calves.


Thank you very much! I have him leading very good and I make sure I stay beside him and don’t let him get ahead of me. He understands that when the halter is on, he has to listen to me. He’s doing really good. I know I should probably dehorn him but I don’t think I’m going to. I only have him and a 6 month old heifer and it’s really just a hobby for me. I just like to feed them and watch them and talk to them. Lol but I’ll start popping him on the nose and making sure he knows he can’t butt me. Thank you!
 

farmerjan

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Let me state that I LIKE horns on an animal.... always have. BUUUUUUUTTTTTTTTTT. All it takes is an animal swinging it's head around, just for a scratch from you, and catching you unawares.... and you can lose an eye or get a real bad "rap" in the head. I had an older jersey cow, that I bought with horns, and she was a very sweet dispositioned cow. Wore a cow halter, I could milk her in the field if I wanted, followed when I called and headed to the barn. She accidentally caught me while putting her head in the manger as I went to catch hold of her halter to clip her tie chain. I had a black and blue bruise for weeks. It was not her fault, I was just in the wrong place as she went to put her head in and I was leaning down.
If the heifer is dehorned, then it is better to dehorn him too; better for both.
 

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