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New calf in snow

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Kell-inKY

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Of course I've been waiting for a cow that's way behind to calf and she does it this morning. We are having our first snow and it's getting down to 11 tonight. Will she be ok, or do I need to have my dad come over (not close) and try and get them in a stall?

I'm recovering from a pretty rough surgery and can't take care of it or it would already be done.
 

farmerjan

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I agree, if the calf has been up and nursed, and the cow is a cow, not a first calf heifer, then I would leave them alone. Do they have some places to get out of the worst of the weather? Maybe some cedar trees or something and maybe you rolled out a roll of hay or a mound of hay from where you moved the next roll somewhere else? The cow will take care of it if it has been up and dry and nursed. I would be a little more concerned if it was a first calf heifer, but if the calf has figured out which end of momma to go to and the cow is letting it, then you should be okay.

Hope you recover quickly and remember, YOU ARE MORE IMPORTANT than the cow regardless. We all try to take the best care of our animals as we can, but there isn't one cow that is worth you getting down, hurt, sick, or worse.
 
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Kell-inKY

Kell-inKY

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Thanks, I honestly didn't give it a second thought until dad called repeatedly, then I start thinking too much. Calf is nursing fine and they have access to some woods and brush, several hay mounds and pine needles, 8 year old mama.

I appreciate it.
 

TCRanch

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Do they have shelter (trees, windbreaks, etc) and/or bedding? Agree, the calf should be fine if it's up & nursing but I'd definitely have someone check it in the morning (stick a finger in its mouth to make sure it's not too cold & it sucks).

Wishing you a speedy recovery.
 

Bigfoot

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Kell-inKY":1qe7ae8a said:
Of course I've been waiting for a cow that's way behind to calf and she does it this morning. We are having our first snow and it's getting down to 11 tonight. Will she be ok, or do I need to have my dad come over (not close) and try and get them in a stall?

I'm recovering from a pretty rough surgery and can't take care of it or it would already be done.

If it got dry and nursed, it's ready to go.
 

Workinonit Farm

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Bigfoot":3l4zsi6q said:
Kell-inKY":3l4zsi6q said:
Of course I've been waiting for a cow that's way behind to calf and she does it this morning. We are having our first snow and it's getting down to 11 tonight. Will she be ok, or do I need to have my dad come over (not close) and try and get them in a stall?

I'm recovering from a pretty rough surgery and can't take care of it or it would already be done.

If it got dry and nursed, it's ready to go.

:nod: :nod: :nod:

No surprise that it was born when it was. Often, if they're "close" they will calve just before/during bad weather or impending change in weather. Barometric pressure changes can bring it on.
 

angus9259

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Workinonit Farm":1pl7d36s said:
No surprise that it was born when it was. Often, if they're "close" they will calve just before/during bad weather or impending change in weather. Barometric pressure changes can bring it on.

Never understood that. Seems like natural selection would have weeded out that genetic predisposition.

Sun, dry, pleasant - no calf.

Rain, wind, sleet, snow - calf.
 

Supa Dexta

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Predators aren't on the move in bad weather.

But also unfavourable conditions causes stress which can also induce it. ie; shipping.
 

farmerjan

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How's the new "way behind" baby doing? We've gotten down to 10 last night not above freezing today but sunny after the snow quit yesterday. Only got about 4" here but more other areas of the state. Supposed to warm up by mid week. Hope you are feeling and recovering better..
 
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Kell-inKY

Kell-inKY

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farmerjan":2dn73a8y said:
How's the new "way behind" baby doing? We've gotten down to 10 last night not above freezing today but sunny after the snow quit yesterday. Only got about 4" here but more other areas of the state. Supposed to warm up by mid week. Hope you are feeling and recovering better..
Didn't see this, sorry. Calf is great, went out one morning at 10 degrees and she was bucking and jumping around like it was Spring! Would post a pic if I had it on this tablet.

Thank You, every day gets a little better thank the Lord.
 

farmerjan

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Sounds like the calf is having a gay ole time playing in that fascinating "white stuff" !!!! Glad they are doing well and that it sounds like you are also coming along slowly but surely. Take care...
 
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Kell-inKY

Kell-inKY

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Update on calf:
I noticed last night the end of her ears look red and scabby. No hair on ends, I didn't notice this a couple of weeks ago when I ran her through the chute and tagged her. The only thing I figure, is she had frost bite from that extremely cold snap right after she was born. Around 10 degrees for several nights there. But why would it take this long to have an effect? No other calf or cow has any skin trouble besides there neck which has the hair worn off from the rusty feeder.

Frostbite? been about 6 weeks since her birth?
 

wbvs58

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I don't have any experience with frostbite but plenty experience with other things that cause the skin to die such as burns. The skin when it dies looks no different at first but starts to dry out and get very stiff and can take a fair time before it finally parts company with the healthy tissue. The time frame that you say would be about what I would expect.The red margins you described is where the dead skin has parted from the healthy parts of the ear, they should heal up real quick now. The size of the ears now should be what you are left with.

Ken
 

City Guy

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I'm sorry, but I have no pity for those who deliberately calve in winter (and have the gaul to call it "spring" calving). I ask again, WHY do you do it? I challenge anyone to DEFEND the practice--don't excuse it--DEFEND it. The best answers Iv'e heard so far are "the ground is frozen so no mud" "no flies" and "get the calving over so we can plant crops"! What are the true economic advantages? Are they worth the death losses, slow gains and extra labor involved. Do calves born in winter bring more $$ than others?

Honestly, some people act like children who can't wait for Xmas morning or they want "bragging rights" about having the first calves of the year.
 

dun

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City Guy":1b44d9ox said:
I'm sorry, but I have no pity for those who deliberately calve in winter (and have the gaul to call it "spring" calving). I ask again, WHY do you do it? I challenge anyone to DEFEND the practice--don't excuse it--DEFEND it. The best answers Iv'e heard so far are "the ground is frozen so no mud" "no flies" and "get the calving over so we can plant crops"! What are the true economic advantages? Are they worth the death losses, slow gains and extra labor involved. Do calves born in winter bring more $$ than others?

Honestly, some people act like children who can't wait for Xmas morning or they want "bragging rights" about having the first calves of the year.
If you refuse to underatnd after it's been explained, sounds like that's your problem not the producers.
 
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Kell-inKY

Kell-inKY

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"City" guy, you need an A$$ whippin, keep your ignorant mouth shut unless you are adding something of value. When you decide to quit being a keyboard warrior and venture into the real world I'd like to be first in line to dole it out. I don't have to defend jack crap to you either.
 

City Guy

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Yeow sirrr Liberals on the warpath! If you can't win the argument just attack the opponent personally. I expected this but I thought someone would try to defend the practice with logical arguments. But it can't be done. There is no good reason for it. You all are going to see PETA in your pastures screaming "Animal Cruelty" and they'll be correct.

By the way, monitor, I thought the threat of physical violence was cause for expulsion.
 

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