Neurological Problem?

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

I have a steer that I purchased with the intent of showing it. His temperment turned out to be not so great. When tied or put in a headcatch, he would get worked up enough to hurt himself trying to get away. A couple days ago, my uncle and I ran the steer (about 13 months old) through a squeeze chute to administer 8-way and brand it before turning it out on pasture. He thrashed around quite a bit, but couldn't do much in the squeeze chute. After giving the shot, he mellowed out and didn't even flinch when branded (very odd). When we let him out, he fell to the ground and couldn't make his front legs function, it was if they were rubber. Also, he had a total attitude change. You could go up and do whatever you wanted to him. It's been a few days and he seems to be doing better now (he's able to walk). We think that it is either a reaction to the 8-way or a neurological problem, where the stress finally got to him and something in his mind snapped. We thought it could possibly be a pinched nerve, but ruled it out as most likely only one leg would be affected and the attitude change didn't fit. Anyway, I was wondering if anyone has any ideas of what may have happened. Thanks! ~Kacey Kiehn

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

My first thought is that you gave the vaccine into the vein instead of under the skin--and the steer had an anaphylactic reaction with some residual brain swelling. Other things are less likely but include blood vessel rupture from increased bp leading to "stroke", brain abscess (should have died if it ruptured) and even taming. Without an exam, it's all a hypothesis anyway! V
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Thanks for the ideas. Just a note, the 8-way was given behind the shoulder, not sure if there are many major blood veins there. A stroke did cross our minds, but the steer never really did pass out, we never really noticed anythin until the brand was applied and he didn't flinch. It would be nice to do an autopsy, but as long he stays alive, i'm going to keep feeding him out until he's a better butcher weight. Thanks Again! ~Kacey

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

I think that Vicki mentioned "taming". My first thought when you were describing what happened was: "This fellow finally figured out that he could be controlled and decided it wasn't as bad as all of that." When the kids did the vaccinating, dehorning, and castrating this year, there was one calf that refused to get up from the squeeze chute. My brother had to drag him from the chute and he layed on the ground for quite awhile before getting up and walking off. I think some individual animals just change their minds about humans when they find out that they CAN be controlled, whether they want to be or not. animals sometimes more resemble humans in their mindsets than we think. lol

[email protected]
 

Similar threads

A
Replies
3
Views
894
Anonymous
A
A
Replies
0
Views
2K
Anonymous
A
A
Replies
3
Views
2K
Anonymous
A
A
Replies
3
Views
1K
Anonymous
A
A
Replies
3
Views
999
Anonymous
A

Latest posts

Top