neck lumps

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Anonymous

Hello, We worked a herd of 250 longhorns and noticed that about 1/3 of them had lumps, about the size of a golf ball on them. The lumps were in the same place on all of them, middle of the left side of the neck. It felt firm under the skin. This herd is vaccinated up the wah-zoo for everything needed. What possibilities could this be, to be in the same spot on every cow? Please advise! Thanks! Gwen, Texas



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Anonymous

I've seen a similar occurence in my cattle from time to time and haven't been able to figure it out either. Mine are not Longhorn.

> Hello, We worked a herd of 250
> longhorns and noticed that about
> 1/3 of them had lumps, about the
> size of a golf ball on them. The
> lumps were in the same place on
> all of them, middle of the left
> side of the neck. It felt firm
> under the skin. This herd is
> vaccinated up the wah-zoo for
> everything needed. What
> possibilities could this be, to be
> in the same spot on every cow?
> Please advise! Thanks! Gwen, Texas
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> Hello, We worked a herd of 250
> longhorns and noticed that about
> 1/3 of them had lumps, about the
> size of a golf ball on them. The
> lumps were in the same place on
> all of them, middle of the left
> side of the neck. It felt firm
> under the skin. This herd is
> vaccinated up the wah-zoo for
> everything needed. What
> possibilities could this be, to be
> in the same spot on every cow?
> Please advise! Thanks! Gwen, Texas

SQ vaccines can cause lumps. Certain types of vaccines are more likely to cause reactions. It's an inflammation response due to the antigen in the vaccine and/or the vaccine carrier. In my experience, these lumps usually go away within a few months, though we did use a pinkeye vaccine that caused lumps that lasted up to several years. The other possibility would be abscesses due to vaccine being administered incorrectly (dirty needle, etc). But it would be unlikely to cause that many abscesses. You can stick a needle into the lump and pull back on the syringe to check for pus. Try sticking the needle in from several angles.



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Anonymous

My heifer has the same thing as a result of a chlostridium vaccination. Over the months there have been a couple of posts that talk about how that is the exact vaccination that seems to do that. She was vaccinated in Oct. and still has the lump. I've been told it could go away or it could stay. I think it is neat that you kind of determined that the reaction happens about 1/3 of the time.
 
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A

Anonymous

Thanks for the input everyone! I suppose it is a reaction to previous SQ vaccines in that area. I was just so concerned that there were that many with the lumps! I was afraid of a parasite or something, but that would likely be on the entire herd and various places on their bodies. Your feedback eases my mind....Thanks!



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Anonymous

my initial response is that it is from the vaccine.... and it reminds me something...

i once heard of a couple of cattlemen who would vacinate their calves in the loose skin beside the tail head area because of the swelling the vaccines causes...

i know the desired?? location is in the neck for injections, but what do some of you think about the tail head area? is this something to do? or avoid?

thanks

gene

> Hello, We worked a herd of 250
> longhorns and noticed that about
> 1/3 of them had lumps, about the
> size of a golf ball on them. The
> lumps were in the same place on
> all of them, middle of the left
> side of the neck. It felt firm
> under the skin. This herd is
> vaccinated up the wah-zoo for
> everything needed. What
> possibilities could this be, to be
> in the same spot on every cow?
> Please advise! Thanks! Gwen, Texas



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A

Anonymous

I've shot in the tail head area too when I can't get any loose skin on the neck. That's usually because the cow is tensed up in the head gate, so I pull skin behind the shoulder, in the ribs or go to the tail area. I haven't noticed any swelling in those locations and it is easy to go ahead and vaccinate there. Thanks!!

> my initial response is that it is
> from the vaccine.... and it
> reminds me something...

> i once heard of a couple of
> cattlemen who would vacinate their
> calves in the loose skin beside
> the tail head area because of the
> swelling the vaccines causes...

> i know the desired?? location is
> in the neck for injections, but
> what do some of you think about
> the tail head area? is this
> something to do? or avoid?

> thanks

> gene



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A

Anonymous

We have a friend who has a mixed small/large practice, and there techs give almost all viccines in the loose skin at the tail head, it is not BQA recommended, and tail head is eaten in some areas, but due to new regulartions, that part may me ruled out due to the locality, and its relation to the spinal column due to BSE

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Anonymous

tail heads can swell also.

a i know would give blackleg vaccinations to show steers on the underside where the leg meets the belly (SQ). not the ideal spot (takes longer to do there) but if swelling does develop, the movement of the leg & the rubbing would help work the knot out.
 

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