Names of Cross Breds

Help Support CattleToday:

Liberal Horn - A Texas Long Horn crossed with one of those "happy cows" from California. :lol:
 
Hey Guys,
I was just wondering if you could post some of the names of some cross bred cattle that i can use for future reference.

Like i basically only know of SimBrah (Brahman x Simmental) and BraFord (Brahman x Hereford). That is all i know and i'm really interested in cattle (which is why i'm on this website to learn from people who know what they're talking about!) and hoping to get into the industry when i'm older.

So yeah... write away please! and any other helpful information about cattle you can add would be much appreciated.

Thanks, nicci
Well mostof these are actually breeds in their own right but here it goes....
Santa Cruz Santa Gertrudis x Hereford
Pinzbrah Pinzguaer x Brahman
Senegus Senepol x Angus
Senepol ~3/8s Ndama x ~5/8s Red Poll
Black Baldie Hereford x black Angus
Red Baldie Hereford x Red Angus
Durham Red Angus x Shorthorn
South Poll Hereford, Senepol, and Barzona I think
Senepol Red Poll x Ndama
Senegus Senepol x Angus
Chiford Chianina x Hereford
Chi-Maine Chianina x Maine Anjou
Chiangus Chianina x Angus
Super Baldie Hereford x Brangus
Brangus Brahman x Angus (usually 3/8s B:5/8s A)
Smokies Charolias x Angus
Yellowfords Charolais x Hereford (I actually have not heard this used in ~15 years)
ARRAB Red Angus x Braford
ABEEF Red Angus Gelbvieh x Braford
ARGEL Gelbvieh x Braford
Those last three are trademarked names for Adams Ranch crosses.
would you know what Charolais x santa is called?
 
There used to be a couple folks on here that did that cross, and had some nice tan calves. Not sure about the temperament part, though.
Neighbor had Char, Beefmaster cross cows..that turned out to be a nice cross..though his wasn't a thought out plan ,he was following the current trends
 
Fence jumping, high headed, sobs is the first thing that came to mind 🤣

... but that's not a fair judgment
Had a 1600 pound Char that could clear a five foot fence from a standing start and never drag a nipple... and a Gert that could tiptoe through a cattle guard like a ballerina. A cross like that would be called a Houdini...
 
Gerts raised around here are as docile and easy to handle as any other cattle, on these 50 acre farms with 30 head or less. I guess if I had a herd of 120 jerseys, that were not bottle raised, turned out on the Kudzu place, that we handled twice a year , just to gather them to tags calves and 6 mos later to wean them, those cows would be about as broke as the Corrientes are, And if I had a bottle raised Corr cow, that I milked twice a day, it would be as gentle and docile as a jersey milk cow. It is all about how you handle them.
 
Last edited:
Gerts raised around here are as docile and easy to handle as any other cattle, on these 50 acre farms with 30 head or less. I guess if I ha a herd of 120 jerseys, t5hat were not bottle raised, turned out on the Kudzu place, that we handled twice a year , just to gather them to tags calves and 6 mos later to wean them, those cows would be about as broke as the Corrientes are, And if I had a bottle raised Corr cow, that I milked twice a day, it would be as gentle and docile as a jersey milk cow. It is all about how you handle them.
I've only had a few Gerts but they all been pretty tame.
I agree it's a whole lot how they are managed. We a neighbor that has a handful of Jerseys. We call the management style survival of fittest. They are wild as anything and a nightmare to have to work with.
 
Gerts raised around here are as docile and easy to handle as any other cattle, on these 50 acre farms with 30 head or less. I guess if I had a herd of 120 jerseys, that were not bottle raised, turned out on the Kudzu place, that we handled twice a year , just to gather them to tags calves and 6 mos later to wean them, those cows would be about as broke as the Corrientes are, And if I had a bottle raised Corr cow, that I milked twice a day, it would be as gentle and docile as a jersey milk cow. It is all about how you handle them.
To a point that's true but some were just born to be wild, to use a cliche.
 
My cousin and I bought 30 head off Herefords one time, 29 were dog gentle. One was a high headed bxxxx who we had to trap to get off summer pasture. All were born and raised on the same farm by an old man who ran cattle his whole life. We had a lot of choice names for her, but what stuck when we finally caught her was Big Mac and Quarter pounder.
 
To a point that's true but some were just born to be wild, to use a cliche.
Yeah, there are definitely throwbacks to the wild aurochs. I've seen some that got raised with others, the others docile enough to scratch their neck... and the wild one would do it's best to be in the next county and if cornered they would turn on you with blood in their eye.
 
That herd of Herefords came with a ratty Salers bull with a broken pecker. He scored about once a month after his injury. That herd/salers cross needed a nickname. All red with some mottled white on the face. Not an impressive cross.
 
My cousin and I bought 30 head off Herefords one time, 29 were dog gentle. One was a high headed bxxxx who we had to trap to get off summer pasture. All were born and raised on the same farm by an old man who ran cattle his whole life. We had a lot of choice names for her, but what stuck when we finally caught her was Big Mac and Quarter pounder.
We've had several Herefords and most have been docile and fairly easy to work with. One particular bull though that we raised that was a calf of a purchased registered Hereford heifer bought as a bred heifer was kind of high strung. He wasn't too bad or hard to handle for us, but anything out of the ordinary going on around him he was pretty high headed.
Some of his daughters were and are a few notches more than he was. Couldn't wait to cull one of them, after weaning her first calf. Her calf that we retained is actually pretty calm which is surprise that she didn't take after her mother.
We still have a sister of the aforementioned cow that is fine usually but unlike yours this one is the opposite she refuses to go to the summer pasture.
They have to cross over a blacktop right of way drive and she will not do it.
Another sister of that cow is standoffish and will not come through a gate while I am standing by it. The other cows will all come through readily but I have to walk out of her sight before she will come through.
I've noticed with Herefords most are pretty docile but when you get one that isn't they are usually pretty far to the other end of the spectrum.
 

Latest posts

Top