my dad visited his buddy. his buddy just got a dui on his lawn mower

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ddd75

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he was mowing his grass in his front yard with a beer. sheriff pulls in and gives him a DUI !!!

cost him 7500.00.

protect and serve? wow.
 

Clodhopper

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In what part of Kentucky does something like that happen? From what I've seen, Kentucky ain't fell off the deep end like Illinois yet, but maybe you all are catching up!
 

callmefence

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Can't get a dui on your on property. Maybe he got lost and was mowing random property's.

Couple guys south of here got dui on horses a while back. Got em dropped as they couldn't prove who was driving and the horses where perfectly sober. :hat:
 

Rafter S

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Maybe he just thought he was mowing his yard, and was really going down the middle of the Interstate? The wrong way?
 

M-5

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TexasBred":2vm1f487 said:
TennesseeTuxedo":2vm1f487 said:
ddd75":2vm1f487 said:
he was mowing his grass in his front yard with a beer. sheriff pulls in and gives him a DUI !!!

cost him 7500.00.

protect and serve? wow.

:bs:

Now waiting for the rest of the story.
ive been looking for Paul Harvey to show up any time now.
 
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ddd75

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look up Ohio laws boys. I'm in OH now btw. The law says you open yourself up to chemical testing if you are on PRIVATE or public property if your OVI. More reason to have gated drives and fencing with no tresspassing signs up.

In the Buckeye State, the charge for drinking and driving is called OVI—operating a vehicle under the influence. And the definition of a vehicle is pretty broad. “It includes everything on wheels or runners, with few exceptions,” says Lt Rick Zwayer, spokesman for the State Highway Patrol. More specifically, the law says a vehicle is “every device, including a motorized bicycle, in, upon, or by which any person or property may be transported or drawn upon a highway.” It excludes motorized wheelchairs, trolleys, trains, and human powered devices that aren't bikes. Mix anything else with too much alcohol and you'll find yourself in trouble.

When it comes to odd vehicles, Cleveland lawyer Robert G Walton has heard it all. Drivers of bicycles and golf carts have been charged. So have boat captains and jet skiers, says Walton, who teaches continuing education courses in OVI law. “I don't know that they've gotten to stilts yet,” he says, “But they've expanded the definition of vehicle to include just about anything that will get you from one place to another without putting your feet on the ground.”
 
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ddd75

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Yes. You can be arrested on private property for OVI if the police have reasonable suspicion to believe you are operating a vehicle under the influence.

Ohio’s OVI law is broadly written prohibiting anyone from operating a vehicle in the state of Ohio if, at the time of operation, “the person is under the influence of alcohol, a drug of abuse, or a combination of them.” O.R.C. 4511.19.

There is no qualifier in the statute for private vs. public property.

Ohio DUI law does not distinguish between drunk driving on private property and drunk driving on public roadways. This means that the police can arrest you in a private business parking lot, on a golf course, or even in a private driveway for OVI.

If you have been arrested for OVI on private property, call our Columbus DUI attorneys to determine whether the police had reasonable suspicion to stop your vehicle and whether any other defenses might apply.
 

TexasBred

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ddd75":2b5zkhfx said:
look up Ohio laws boys. I'm in OH now btw. The law says you open yourself up to chemical testing if you are on PRIVATE or public property if your OVI. More reason to have gated drives and fencing with no tresspassing signs up.

In the Buckeye State, the charge for drinking and driving is called OVI—operating a vehicle under the influence. And the definition of a vehicle is pretty broad. “It includes everything on wheels or runners, with few exceptions,” says Lt Rick Zwayer, spokesman for the State Highway Patrol. More specifically, the law says a vehicle is “every device, including a motorized bicycle, in, upon, or by which any person or property may be transported or drawn upon a highway.” It excludes motorized wheelchairs, trolleys, trains, and human powered devices that aren't bikes. Mix anything else with too much alcohol and you'll find yourself in trouble.

When it comes to odd vehicles, Cleveland lawyer Robert G Walton has heard it all. Drivers of bicycles and golf carts have been charged. So have boat captains and jet skiers, says Walton, who teaches continuing education courses in OVI law. “I don't know that they've gotten to stilts yet,” he says, “But they've expanded the definition of vehicle to include just about anything that will get you from one place to another without putting your feet on the ground.”
I would think 99.9% of this horse shyt would be at the discretion of the police officer. (And perhaps your own conduct)
 

Bright Raven

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Operating a motor vehicle under the influence also applies to private property in Kentucky.

Excerpt:

A person shall not operate or be in physical control of a motor vehicle anywhere in
this state:
(a) Having an alcohol concentration of 0.08 or more as measured by a
scientifically reliable test or tests of a sample of the person's breath or blood
taken within two (2) hours of cessation of operation or physical control of a
motor vehicle;
(b) While under the influence of alcohol;

......
 

M.Magis

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TexasBred":32nvfts7 said:
ddd75":32nvfts7 said:
look up Ohio laws boys. I'm in OH now btw. The law says you open yourself up to chemical testing if you are on PRIVATE or public property if your OVI. More reason to have gated drives and fencing with no tresspassing signs up.

In the Buckeye State, the charge for drinking and driving is called OVI—operating a vehicle under the influence. And the definition of a vehicle is pretty broad. “It includes everything on wheels or runners, with few exceptions,” says Lt Rick Zwayer, spokesman for the State Highway Patrol. More specifically, the law says a vehicle is “every device, including a motorized bicycle, in, upon, or by which any person or property may be transported or drawn upon a highway.” It excludes motorized wheelchairs, trolleys, trains, and human powered devices that aren't bikes. Mix anything else with too much alcohol and you'll find yourself in trouble.

When it comes to odd vehicles, Cleveland lawyer Robert G Walton has heard it all. Drivers of bicycles and golf carts have been charged. So have boat captains and jet skiers, says Walton, who teaches continuing education courses in OVI law. “I don't know that they've gotten to stilts yet,” he says, “But they've expanded the definition of vehicle to include just about anything that will get you from one place to another without putting your feet on the ground.”
I would think 99.9% of this horse shyt would be at the discretion of the police officer. (And perhaps your own conduct)
This is almost always the deciding factor. There's more to the story.
 

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