Moving Cattle Question

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Foltzfarm

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We had about 15 head of cattle in one field to themselves and we wanted to seperate a few of them out. Which meant, we were going to move them out of one field to the barn yard and seperate them. While trying to move the cattle out of the field, there was one calf that would not go through the gate. One person was on a 4-wheeler and two others were in the field and still could not get the calf to go through the gate. What startles them that they have to break back and go the opposite way? What is an easier way to move the cattle out of the field? This happens all the time, and sometimes, we cannot get a whole group to go through the gate. Any advice?

Thanks.
 

dun

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There is always one calf that doesn;t get the picture. Leave the gate open and it will eventually find it's way in. When we're moving cows with calves we only move them one field at a time until they get to where we want them. Sometimes it will take a day or so in the next field before they're ready to be moved again to the next field.
 

backhoeboogie

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I grab a sack of cubes and yell "Come On" and the cows would follow me to hades and back. Calves are always a problem when I change pastures. The only time I have real concern is when I move them across the paved roads and the calves don't come. After they are 3 to 4 months old and they have changed pastures a few times, they are right in there with the rest of them.

What I have learned to do is make sure all the cows and calves are on the latch side of the gate before I open it. That way when the gate swings in, the calves are not behind the gate but rather the gate funnels them somewhat into the opening and then I simply hope they fall in with the rest of the bunch.
 

grannysoo

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Calves are always a problem like this. If possible, let one of your big cows back out with the calf and bring them in together. That always helps.
 

dieselbeef

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backhoeboogie said:
I grab a sack of cubes and yell "Come On" and the cows would follow me to hades and back. Calves are always a problem when I change pastures. The only time I have real concern is when I move them across the paved roads and the calves don't come. After they are 3 to 4 months old and they have changed pastures a few times, they are right in there with the rest of them.

What I have learned to do is make sure all the cows and calves are on the latch side of the gate before I open it. That way when the gate swings in, the calves are not behind the gate but rather the gate funnels them somewhat into the opening and then I simply hope they fall in with the rest of the bunch.

pretty much how i do it too.
i just did this yesterday w/the 4 wheeler and abucket. they get pellets everyday for just this reason. i walked em with them following me acroos the pasture and thru the gate. then went back and got the calfs and put them in the other pasture and then put the cows back

wife says im the pied piper of cattle...have bucket will follow. mine also must go into the pens to eat
 

dyates

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I always, no exceptions, try to build gates in corners. Calves can still be stupid, crazy, or (insert your adjective here), but gates in corners sure helps.
 

grubbie

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A lot of calves will fall to the back as the herd moves through the gate. For this reason, as the first couple cows start to move through I push the back of the herd harder to keep everyone moving forward at a good speed, calves and all. This is for a large herd, by the way. If you do have a few calves hanging back, just back off and don't try to push them, its a losing battle. They will usually turn around a few times and then follow the herd if they are left alone and can still see the herd. If your gate is not in a corner, move it to one, or build a little wing fence. Otherwise you will fight them every time. Just how we do things, works for us. Good luck!
 

novatech

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That what you get by having good fences. I don't have that problem, the calves just crawl through. :lol:
Gates in the corner as some else mentioned, but will still happen. You just got to go back and get them.
 

LoveMoo11

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We always try to get ours gathered up in a smaller area, usually on the cement pad, before trying to sort them. I can take a bucket of grain and get the cows to go anywhere with me, but the calves don't always get it.
 

redcowsrule33

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We try to have a halter-broke animal around for just this reason. If you tie the cow just inside the gate the calf runs to her and finds the hole instead of panicing. Works every time.
 

Bez+

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Small groups with calves on a farm - open the gate after they are all there together.

Drop a couple of 5 gallon pails of grain on the ground - about 20 yards from the gate - on the side you want them to move to - stop and let them eat it.

Calves will catch up.

Patience always makes things better.

Bez+
 

Calman

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I always move mine with the four wheeler and a sack of calling cubes on the back.
They will follow me even into the working pens.
But then again ther's always the little calves that has to show off,head butting,running around and tossing their rear hooves in the air.Just got to be patient and wait until they use up that sudden burst of energy.
Also fun to watch them.

Cal
 

Bez+

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Calman":3fd8ofzs said:
I always move mine with the four wheeler and a sack of calling cubes on the back.
They will follow me even into the working pens.
But then again ther's always the little calves that has to show off,head butting,running around and tossing their rear hooves in the air.Just got to be patient and wait until they use up that sudden burst of energy.
Also fun to watch them.

Cal

That is the issue - the calves.

Not fun to watch when you have to move them - they are a frigging pain in the @ss.

Will not cross fences and try paved roads some time.

Any anything is an excuse to turn back - even a tractor in a field two miles away.

Move a couple hundred pairs and then you got trouble.

But if you only have 10 you got true trouble - they are idiots and do not have the herd instinct yet - so the smaller the group, the tougher it can be to move them.

Most of that energy is fear when being moved. Their home is where mom lived with them. Mom might be willing to leave but the calf is afraid to even step out the gate.

That is why you need to hold the cows about 20 - 30 yards out - grain will do it. Calves will stop at the gate line - just wait - or push them real soft - do not get them running - once they start running they tend to go for a long ways. Especially the calves under three weeks of age. And they are not smart enough to stop. They will cruise through fences at top speed and you name it. Electric means nothing to a calf for the first few weeks.

Patience is the name of the game

Bez+
 

phillse

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there are a few ways to do this. Tow with feed. A good trained cow dog. let the calf get hungry it is usualy no problem to then open the gate a nd let in pasture with mom granted the fieldsa ajoining.
 

tytower

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They naturally follow. I find if I slow down when most are through and let the remainder see where the others are going,no problems.
There's some good advice on here though . Gates in corners are a must ,opening back fully against one fence and lockable there till they are all through. A dog would be handy but I reckon only 1 in 10 intended for cattle actually end up working cattle.
My bugger turns them in circles, and back on me ,and bloody everywhere, all at once. So he's a pet now isnt he.!
 

Devin

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We had A similar situation one time where the cattle had to be moved across the road to another field. Cows had calves that were about 250lbs on them. Everone went across perfectly except for one calf. We were moving the cows and calves to load to another farm. I figured he would hang around the gate and eventually I could get him across. No luck. I moved his momma back over and he still would not cross. I finally moved momma back across with no problem and just left him. He grew up by himself to about 500 lbs and I sold him to a guy who shot him in the field for beef. Dun is right some of them never get the picture. Good luck.
 

1982vett

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tytower":2651q810 said:
A dog would be handy but I reckon only 1 in 10 intended for cattle actually end up working cattle.
My bugger turns them in circles, and back on me ,and bloody everywhere, all at once. So he's a pet now isnt he.!
:lol: I've got a lab-mix that does that. She goes for the head (which is usually headed in the general direction I want them to go just not at the pace she needs to be going). When she first started doing it I thought it was going to be a disaster when the cow turned around and headed in the wrong direction, but the little bugger is fast and in a second or two she is back in the cows face and the cow turns and heads the right direction in a hurry. :lol2: Then she comes back to get her pat on the head, we get back in the truck (she has to ride and bark at them out the window, won't work running along side :roll: ). We herd em up until one doesn't think she needs to co-operate then I stop the truck, get out and open the back door and here we go again. :D Ole cows are starting to get wise enough to get a move on when they see me open the door and get out, they know the dog isn't far behind.
 

cross_7

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[quoteMy bugger turns them in circles, and back on me ,and bloody everywhere, all at once. So he's a pet now isnt he.!][/quote]

herding dogs circle the cattle and bring them to you, thats how they have been bred..it's instinct.
with proper training you can teach them to bring the cattle to you and then help you drive them or just send the dog and go stand where you want the cattle.
a good dog will do the work of several men.
 

novatech

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When I was a kid we worked cattle with Catahoula Leopard dogs. We turned them loose at the pens. They would bring cattle back out of the Gulf Coast marsh lands and woods that had not seen people for a year at a time. Most of these cattle were Brahman that would fight their own shadow. Never saw them leave a calf behind. Never saw one that could not teach a bad As- cow a lesson.
The old experienced dogs taught the young ones.
 

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