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True Grit Farms

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If you can't feed em don't breed em, seems like an easy fix to me. All my black friends around here tell me how good they ate growing up. Between the hogs, cows and gardens everyone shared what they had and lived good. They still grow and tend gardens 50 years later, I get all my collards, turnips, peas, plums and pears from them.
I'm glad I never have seen the poor side of the country blacks, seen enough in the city and school system to last a lifetime.
Drugs and crime are something you don't need to worry about with my black neighbors, as a matter of fact my black neighbors are my best neighbors.
 

backhoeboogie

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My dad took in several kids. My little brother was adopted at birth. We picked up a 4 year old boy once about 100 miles south of here. We went to a local café to eat. That kid put away some groceries. Then he asked if he could have a piece of pie. Dad asked him, "Where you gonna put it?" and the little boy just looked down. The pie came and he ate a bite or two. Then he asked the waitress for a bag to put the pie in, "I may not have anything to eat tomorrow"

I got all teary eyed and choked up. I must have been about 16 and this was one of the most humbling experiences of my life. That 4 year old kid who knew what it was like to go hungry. I began to realize how blessed I was even tho I didn't have a lot of gadgets some kids had.
 

Caustic Burno

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backhoeboogie":2pezu0y8 said:
My dad took in several kids. My little brother was adopted at birth. We picked up a 4 year old boy once about 100 miles south of here. We went to a local café to eat. That kid put away some groceries. Then he asked if he could have a piece of pie. Dad asked him, "Where you gonna put it?" and the little boy just looked down. The pie came and he ate a bite or two. Then he asked the waitress for a bag to put the pie in, "I may not have anything to eat tomorrow"

I got all teary eyed and choked up. I must have been about 16 and this was one of the most humbling experiences of my life. That 4 year old kid who knew what it was like to go hungry. I began to realize how blessed I was even tho I didn't have a lot of gadgets some kids had.

Lots of folks didn’t have two nickels to rub together from the sixties back.
It was especially tough on widow women with a pile of kids. My wife’s bunch were dirt poor, had it not been for the belief of taking care of widows and orphans back then they would have starved to death. I think to this day that is why there is so much food stored in this house.
Different times and attitudes as well about working to eat the pendulum has swung way far in the other direction.
I wonder today how many would actually work if the food stamp program closed shop.
 

boondocks

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True Grit Farms":1iz5qkf1 said:
If you can't feed em don't breed em, seems like an easy fix to me. All my black friends around here tell me how good they ate growing up. Between the hogs, cows and gardens everyone shared what they had and lived good. They still grow and tend gardens 50 years later, I get all my collards, turnips, peas, plums and pears from them.
I'm glad I never have seen the poor side of the country blacks, seen enough in the city and school system to last a lifetime.
Drugs and crime are something you don't need to worry about with my black neighbors, as a matter of fact my black neighbors are my best neighbors.

TG, did you read the article? I too believe in family planning but this article is largely about historical poverty in MS (ie, pre-The-Pill and modern family planning ideas and methods). Blacks were also systemically discriminated against in housing, farm loans, etc. The family profiled was just a couple generations removed from slavery. Yet the young child who grew up hungry in the 1960s now has 2 sons who own a trucking company, and his other 2 kids are a teacher and a doctor.
My Appalachian ancestors also had big families who, although everyone worked hard, didn't have much (and I'm sure food was sometimes scarce).
Point is, sure, some folks (of any race) did "ok" back when but as a general rule, before modern family planning most families were big and struggled. And yes, those who faced discrimination in jobs, loans, education and housing doubtless struggled more.
 

pdfangus

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My parents were born in the 1920's
my dad was the second oldest of eight kids
my mom was the youngest of eight...
my dad had to quit school and go to work to support the family, when he was in the eighth grade when his Dad Died .
My moms father was killed in an auto wreck when she was a baby and she was put in an orphanage with three older siblings and my mother was there until she was twelve.
They struggled through the depression and then came WWII....Dad had two younger brothers who went and came back...one made a career in the navy.
I recall family with three rooms and a path and a hand pump at the kitchen sink....
people today have no idea of what a hard time is....
 

Caustic Burno

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boondocks":at2gnsxq said:
True Grit Farms":at2gnsxq said:
If you can't feed em don't breed em, seems like an easy fix to me. All my black friends around here tell me how good they ate growing up. Between the hogs, cows and gardens everyone shared what they had and lived good. They still grow and tend gardens 50 years later, I get all my collards, turnips, peas, plums and pears from them.
I'm glad I never have seen the poor side of the country blacks, seen enough in the city and school system to last a lifetime.
Drugs and crime are something you don't need to worry about with my black neighbors, as a matter of fact my black neighbors are my best neighbors.

TG, did you read the article? I too believe in family planning but this article is largely about historical poverty in MS (ie, pre-The-Pill and modern family planning ideas and methods). Blacks were also systemically discriminated against in housing, farm loans, etc. The family profiled was just a couple generations removed from slavery. Yet the young child who grew up hungry in the 1960s now has 2 sons who own a trucking company, and his other 2 kids are a teacher and a doctor.
My Appalachian ancestors also had big families who, although everyone worked hard, didn't have much (and I'm sure food was sometimes scarce).
Point is, sure, some folks (of any race) did "ok" back when but as a general rule, before modern family planning most families were big and struggled. And yes, those who faced discrimination in jobs, loans, education and housing doubtless struggled more.


Poverty was heavily impacted by carpetbaggers and reconstruction into the 1960’s
 

TexasBred

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Caustic Burno":3cqnz0ur said:
boondocks":3cqnz0ur said:
True Grit Farms":3cqnz0ur said:
If you can't feed em don't breed em, seems like an easy fix to me. All my black friends around here tell me how good they ate growing up. Between the hogs, cows and gardens everyone shared what they had and lived good. They still grow and tend gardens 50 years later, I get all my collards, turnips, peas, plums and pears from them.
I'm glad I never have seen the poor side of the country blacks, seen enough in the city and school system to last a lifetime.
Drugs and crime are something you don't need to worry about with my black neighbors, as a matter of fact my black neighbors are my best neighbors.

TG, did you read the article? I too believe in family planning but this article is largely about historical poverty in MS (ie, pre-The-Pill and modern family planning ideas and methods). Blacks were also systemically discriminated against in housing, farm loans, etc. The family profiled was just a couple generations removed from slavery. Yet the young child who grew up hungry in the 1960s now has 2 sons who own a trucking company, and his other 2 kids are a teacher and a doctor.
My Appalachian ancestors also had big families who, although everyone worked hard, didn't have much (and I'm sure food was sometimes scarce).
Point is, sure, some folks (of any race) did "ok" back when but as a general rule, before modern family planning most families were big and struggled. And yes, those who faced discrimination in jobs, loans, education and housing doubtless struggled more.


Poverty was heavily impacted by carpetbaggers and reconstruction into the 1960’s
Actually most of it was caused by the home bred local trash white folks. There offspring now ride around with the confederate flags flying from their trucks and reproduce !!!!
 

Caustic Burno

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TexasBred":3f60nu9r said:
Caustic Burno":3f60nu9r said:
boondocks":3f60nu9r said:
TG, did you read the article? I too believe in family planning but this article is largely about historical poverty in MS (ie, pre-The-Pill and modern family planning ideas and methods). Blacks were also systemically discriminated against in housing, farm loans, etc. The family profiled was just a couple generations removed from slavery. Yet the young child who grew up hungry in the 1960s now has 2 sons who own a trucking company, and his other 2 kids are a teacher and a doctor.
My Appalachian ancestors also had big families who, although everyone worked hard, didn't have much (and I'm sure food was sometimes scarce).
Point is, sure, some folks (of any race) did "ok" back when but as a general rule, before modern family planning most families were big and struggled. And yes, those who faced discrimination in jobs, loans, education and housing doubtless struggled more.


Poverty was heavily impacted by carpetbaggers and reconstruction into the 1960’s
Actually most of it was caused by the home bred local trash white folks. There offspring now ride around with the confederate flags flying from their trucks and reproduce !!!!


Another cry for attention.
Guess if you can’t get any positive, negative will have to do.
 

True Grit Farms

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I think the playing field is level now, let's forget the past and move ahead. It'll never happen because all you need to do is look at the exit polls to see why. Somehow we need to figure out a solution and taxing one sector to pay for the other has proven it's not going to work.
 
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