Lutalyse for edema?

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novaman

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We have never intervened with edema on dairy cows. It was always left to take care of itself. After having several cows with issues tied to the edema I went in search of something to take the swelling down. I talked to a neighbor and they claim that a shot of Lutalyse will take the swelling down. Has anyone else heard of this? Does it actually work? Are there better options available?
 

milkmaid

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I can't think what Lute could possibly do to reduce edema. Not coming up with anything plausible.

Dexamethasone, Predef2x, and Salix/Lasix can reduce edema though. Anything that takes out inflammation, acts as a diuretic, and increases water loss will get rid of edema to some extent.
 

dun

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I agree with milkmaid. We used to give a bolus of Naqusone but Lasix works and it's easier to give a shot then trying to get a bolus down one of them.
I would look for the root cause of the edema. A little edema is fairly common but when number of them have it I would try to figure out why
 

hillsdown

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I agree also, we used a product once and a while but for the life of me I cannot remember the name of it. I do remember that it was quite hard on the cow so we only used it when absolutely necessary..

Dun, what did you post about last year regarding edema and maybe being linked to mineral or salt intake. I can't seem to find it and with dial up it will take me forever..
 
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novaman

novaman

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dun":7i2cnjid said:
I agree with milkmaid. We used to give a bolus of Naqusone but Lasix works and it's easier to give a shot then trying to get a bolus down one of them.
I would look for the root cause of the edema. A little edema is fairly common but when number of them have it I would try to figure out why
I agree that finding the cause would be the best cure. Been working on it but haven't come up with anything as of yet. They are on a prefresh diet with minerals specific for prefresh cows. The mineral has no sodium and no potassium. One thing that may be a hidden cause is the water. It has a sodium content of 600 mg/L (2.3 g/gal). I'm wondering if this could be considered significant enough to be a possible cause.
 

hillsdown

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Here is some info I found on edema Nova.


Like other metabolic diseases which appear at calving time, the causes of udder edema can usually be traced to feeding and management practices during the dry period.

In udder edema, there is an accumulation of fluid in the udder. Accumulation begins at the base of the udder and, in mild cases, may be present around only one or two quarters. As the severity of the edema increases, the entire udder becomes affected and fluid may spread through the abdominal area, the thighs and vulva.

There does not appear to be one single cause of udder edema. Normal metabolic changes, genetics and nutrition likely all play a role.


Metabolic Changes
Most cows experience some edema prior to calving due to hormonal and physiological changes, which take place prior to calving.

Increasing pressure, caused by fetal growth, results in a restriction of blood and lymph flow away from the udder in late pregnancy. This occurs concurrently with an increased blood flow to the udder. Smaller blood vessels and a reduced fluid flow is likely the reason why heifers are more prone to udder edema than are cows.

There is a drop in blood proteins as the cow transfers immunoglobulins (proteins) to colostrum. This is thought to increase the permeability of the blood vessels allowing an increase in fluid buildup.

Changes in hormone levels are also believed to play a role in udder edema. This may be why the dairy you spoke of finds that lute works for edema.

Genetics
Increased susceptibility to udder edema is an inherited trait.


Nutrition
There are several nutrition factors implicated in udder edema.

High intakes of potassium during the dry period predispose cows to udder edema by increasing fluid retention. Potassium levels in dry cow forages are often over 2% - much higher than required. Feed forages with low potassium such as grass (eg. timothy) hays and corn silage (in limited amounts) during the dry period. Intake of potassium should not exceed 250g.

A high sodium (ie. salt) intake also predisposes cows to udder edema by increasing fluid retention. Limit salt intake during the dry period to 30g (one ounce) per day. If salt is fed free choice, provide it in block form rather than loose as this will decrease consumption. Remove any sodium bicarbonate buffer, which may be present in the feed, typically from the milking cow diet. Check the water for sodium levels as some areas in Manitoba have high sodium, or salty, water.

Low magnesium during the dry period has been implicated in udder edema. Ensure close-up dry cow rations contain 0.4% magnesium.

Excessive grain intakes prior to calving have been associated with increased incidence of udder edema. Feed a dry cow diet that is properly balanced for protein and energy.

Ensure levels of zinc and vitamin E are adequate in the close-up dry period (40 mg/kg and 1200 IU/day respectively). Both help to reduce the effects of oxidative stress on the udder. Oxidative damage can be triggered by the release of iron in times of stress, trauma or nutritional imbalance.

http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/livest ... 18s05.html


I would get your nutritionist involved and find out exactly what your TMR contains for salt and minerals and add into that the % of salt content in the water they consume.
 

bigbull338

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we never gave the cows anything for edema.it was always gone in 2 or 3wks or quicker.
 

dun

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bigbull338":34t6a0ax said:
we never gave the cows anything for edema.it was always gone in 2 or 3wks or quicker.

I agree. The only time we used anything was if it was so severe that you could only get a cup or so per quarter. Other then that we left it alone. With beef cows, the nursing and butting of the udder seems to help it clear up fast.
 
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novaman

novaman

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dun":392855yk said:
bigbull338":392855yk said:
we never gave the cows anything for edema.it was always gone in 2 or 3wks or quicker.

I agree. The only time we used anything was if it was so severe that you could only get a cup or so per quarter. Other then that we left it alone. With beef cows, the nursing and butting of the udder seems to help it clear up fast.
I don't plan on taking action for every case, but don't you think that taking measures to drop the swelling would result in quicker recovery and possibly higher peak milk? If there's one thing I've noticed, younger people such as myself, are probably a little over-anxious to do something in order the fix the problem. Some of you may be more seasoned and have it figured out better than I do. My only experience with older generations comes from my parents and grandparents and they also had the let it be attitude. Not trying to upset anyone. Just trying to understand if your recommendations come with good reason or is that just how you've always done it? I've been told that anything that slows the cow down will affect her peak milk and subsequent production for that lactation. I want to do all I can to allow them to express their potential.
 

regolith

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I don't plan on taking action for every case, but don't you think that taking measures to drop the swelling would result in quicker recovery and possibly higher peak milk?

Just observation (I don't record which heifers have edema): I don't think it makes any difference.
The first few milkings can be frustrating if the teats are swollen and she can't milk out properly... basically, if it gets to a third milking and there's still excessive swelling or she hasn't milked out properly, I give a shot of oxytocin at the start of the next milking.
I don't think I've ever had to do it twice for any heifer. Once the udder is emptied the swelling doesn't come back enough to restrict milking.

Mind you, you guys whose heifers are peaking at three times my girls' production might have a different story.
 

TexasBred

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Never treated edema but always removed all salt from dry cows the lasts 30 days or so plus a using a good dry cow ration and mineral formulated for dry cows as a preventive.
 

LoveMoo11

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I'm assuming you are talking about udder edema? Have you tried mint cream after each milking? Just be careful not to get it on any cuts/scrapes or teat ends because it can sting.
 

francismilker

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I been told that peppermint essential oil can be rubbed on the bag twice per day and edema will clear up a lot quicker and it's all natural with no withdrawel time.
 

dun

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There is also thee warm, wet , wilted cabbage leaf cure. I just never have figured out how you're supposed to keep them on the udder.
 

TexasBred

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dun":2wpcnj1n said:
There is also thee warm, wet , wilted cabbage leaf cure. I just never have figured out how you're supposed to keep them on the udder.


That may be "Victoria's Secret". :lol2:
 

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