Low/no maintenance cattle

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annmariemz23

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We run on range that is contiguous to a group of wild cattle on two sides. I have had my fill in the last 20 years of dealing with wild bulls. I had one chase my colt one day, and only survived collision because when I turned to see him almost at my horse's hip, my hat fell off in his face and he shied and kept running. Yeah, they function as clean-up bulls sometimes, but I wish they would all die or someone would come get them.
 

annmariemz23

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Known horned and scurred animals in the history of AAA. Holstein got in some accidently and who knows what got added on purpose. The growth fad when heights got out of whack certainly had to have some outside influences.

If the feral cows are able to be tamed they could be useful.
Some will gentle down, but my experience is that they will escape even then and go back to their original range. Have had birth defects with both unregistered bulls and feral horses.
 

Jafruech

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A friend is helping neighbors sort and load some cattle that have been almost feral for over 20 years. Minimal winter feed and no doctoring. My friend noticed that there are absolutely no bad eyes in any of cattle. They calve totally on their own. Prettiest set calves in sink with nature. Approximately 15 bulls with 25-30 cows. I wonder what one those bulls would contribute to a herd?

Those genetics from that herd would probably add improvements to just about any herd out there if you selected right. I'd still rather use some LH genetics though.

Nature had hundreds of years to get it right with them vs 20.
 

Lee VanRoss

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annz23> There was nothing in your response that indicated your cattle were better because they are black.
You do state your cattle are black, however; by your own admission this is due to your perception of a financial advantage
without regard to substance. Without control of the area your cattle run on you are subject to the mongrelization of
your herd regardless of color. Thank you for confirming my analysis. Best wishes LVR
 

Jafruech

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Just get some Wye cattle, there is semen available on other very old or overseas black animals that should be pure as well. There are a lot of modern black genetics in many of the reds.

I do love wye genetics if you're chosing to go black. There are some great red Angus out there and good reasons to run them, but if you prefer low maintenance, good disposition, good genetics, good balance of characteristics...then wye is hard to beat. I have a son out of Beral of Wye and am home raising bulls out of his daughters.
 

Rmc

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If they are that inbred as long as the bull is fertile you should get pretty good hybrid vigor out of the first cross
 

gcreekrch

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Several years back they gathered a bunch of bulls and feeder cattle from the Aleutian Island. Bulls went to the kill plant in Alberta (not much left of them after the extended stress and many of the feeder cattle died as they had no immunity to modern disease even though they got vaccinated.
 

farmguy

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For what it is worth many years ago a neighbor sold registered angus and had a Holstein herd, he was phasing out of dairy. This is when the European large breeds were the rage. Funny thing his registered heifers started having a little white around the naval and maybe on the udder, not much. He did have a dispersal of his angus eventually and for a while sold registered bulls.
 

Jafruech

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If they are that inbred as long as the bull is fertile you should get pretty good hybrid vigor out of the first cross
If it's truly been a feral herd let run wild with no bull calves ever taken out I would imagine the inbreeding coefficient is low. Probably under 15%
 

Dry Creek Livestock

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A friend is helping neighbors sort and load some cattle that have been almost feral for over 20 years. Minimal winter feed and no doctoring. My friend noticed that there are absolutely no bad eyes in any of cattle. They calve totally on their own. Prettiest set calves in sink with nature. Approximately 15 bulls with 25-30 cows. I wonder what one those bulls would contribute to a herd?
 

Shoestring

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You are spot on KY ! A registered Angus may carry horned genes but a pure Scottish genetic version will not. For this reason I will
not allow any black Angus on the place. I do not have any but I am a life time member of the American Chianina Association since
before they became involved in the Black Angus Polution Venture. Gelbveigh, Saler. Simmental and a plethora of non black types
of cattle all jumped on the Black Cattle Band Wagon. I will say the American Angus Association have been master marketers of the
breed especially as regards the black color. It goes without saying that a number of members on these pages have drank the nectar
and turned their herds black. I would ask by what standard does color determine the quality of a cow? The only logical answer is
the perception of financial advantage without regard to function. There is little doubt in my mind those most fractured by my
comments will be of the purveyors of the 'Holy Grail of the Blackened Cow'
All I know is that I sold 2 yearlings 3 yrs ago in N. Texas. Virtually identical. Red A. Brought $1.22 lb. Black brought $2.01 lb. They were both born onsite, ate the same feed, thereby costing me the same. I had to follow the money.
 

Lee VanRoss

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Assuming there is no Paul Harvey version to the story I would have brought the red one home.
 

farmerjan

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Yep, we have a couple times brought the red/off colored one home. I'm good with eating the "colored ones" and selling the black ones. I am just getting sick of the black mentality around here.... and don't get me started on the dairy cross calves that aren't worth beans, when they will more often than not dress out and grade prime than many black ones.... and have the marbling to make eating a real pleasure.
 

Ky hills

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When we buy replacements we look for red ones because they can usually be bought cheaper. When we pick from our calves to finish out we go with red ones and sell the black ones. The Hereford or Herefordx calves are just as good meat quality wise, but the black hided ones sell better. It is very frustrating the perception that black cattle are superior and others are docked even though that is the resulting reality, that was based on fake news before it was a term. No breed or type is perfect. We have both red and black cattle and I like both. Whenever we work the calves I prefer the Herefords, when we sell I prefer to have Angus or Angusx,
 

SBMF 2015

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16years ago, several neighbors in the area asked us if we could help another neighbor out with his cows. They were tired of his cows in there corn and soybeans.
So after harvest we constructed a plan. We asked neighbor X how many cattle he had? He said 65, we hauled home 83! He barn had blown down in a storm three year prior, so no feeder cattle had been sold for at least 3 years. I don't think a vet had ever set foot on the place. Some of the cows were foundered from being in the neighbors corn.
They were all crazy, head hunters.
The only cows worth keeping,we're the old ones that weren't inbred. We ended up culling down to 20 cows, started managing the herd, and making fence as fast as I could.
 

Nkline

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I do love wye genetics if you're chosing to go black. There are some great red Angus out there and good reasons to run them, but if you prefer low maintenance, good disposition, good genetics, good balance of characteristics...then wye is hard to beat. I have a son out of Beral of Wye and am home raising bulls out of his daughters.
I’m currently running a couple Franchester of Wye sons, and a DDA Fahren 21x (heavy Wye influence) son. Previously I ran a couple Bannon of Wye sons. I think the Wye genetics are very useful in making problem free productive cattle, and they can hang some high quality carcasses as well.
 
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