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kickinbull

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A friend is helping neighbors sort and load some cattle that have been almost feral for over 20 years. Minimal winter feed and no doctoring. My friend noticed that there are absolutely no bad eyes in any of cattle. They calve totally on their own. Prettiest set calves in sink with nature. Approximately 15 bulls with 25-30 cows. I wonder what one those bulls would contribute to a herd?
 

Ky hills

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A friend is helping neighbors sort and load some cattle that have been almost feral for over 20 years. Minimal winter feed and no doctoring. My friend noticed that there are absolutely no bad eyes in any of cattle. They calve totally on their own. Prettiest set calves in sink with nature. Approximately 15 bulls with 25-30 cows. I wonder what one those bulls would contribute to a herd?
Have seen a couple herds like that locally over the years. Those herds had their share of problems bad eyes and other things, nature took its course I guess is why there wasn’t more evidence of problems. The neighbors weren’t to happy if any of the cattle got over on them, and there were plenty of bulls to do just that. These were pure Angus herds and in both some had diverted back to having horns, and some individuals looked unique to put it mildly. Some were good looking animals and no doubt were tough.
 

Hpacres440p

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A friend is helping neighbors sort and load some cattle that have been almost feral for over 20 years. Minimal winter feed and no doctoring. My friend noticed that there are absolutely no bad eyes in any of cattle. They calve totally on their own. Prettiest set calves in sink with nature. Approximately 15 bulls with 25-30 cows. I wonder what one those bulls would contribute to a herd?
That’s a lot of bulls for that few cows. Wonder what the inbreeding quotient is after all that time?
 

Lucky_P

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Had one client with a herd like that back in Southern Middle TN, back in the early 1980s... pretty sure he'd not introduced any new genetics in decades... herd was mostly Angus with noticeable Jersey influence. Pretty little black, polled, dish-faced cows with really nice udders. A huge cow in that herd might weigh 800 lb.; most were significantly smaller. Average calf weight... of the few I saw... probably 30-40 lbs, max.
 

Ky hills

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A pure angus Will Not 'divert ' back to having horns.
In theory that may be true, however the registered Angus cesspool has likely gotten pretty muddy at times. Was questioning a friend that had registered Angus once about some white on a calf and his reasoning was that Angus were a relatively young breed in comparison and that early on there was some variation. One of the early bulls was named Gray Breasted Jock. A few decades ago the rumor was that there was some Holstein in some Angus. It would not surprise me if some Chianina didn’t find its way into a few individuals of all breeds.
 

Stocker Steve

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In theory that may be true, however the registered Angus cesspool has likely gotten pretty muddy at times. Was questioning a friend that had registered Angus once about some white on a calf and his reasoning was that Angus were a relatively young breed in comparison and that early on there was some variation. One of the early bulls was named Gray Breasted Jock. A few decades ago the rumor was that there was some Holstein in some Angus. It would not surprise me if some Chianina didn’t find its way into a few individuals of all breeds.
Have to go red to have a chance at pure.
 

Lee VanRoss

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You are spot on KY ! A registered Angus may carry horned genes but a pure Scottish genetic version will not. For this reason I will
not allow any black Angus on the place. I do not have any but I am a life time member of the American Chianina Association since
before they became involved in the Black Angus Polution Venture. Gelbveigh, Saler. Simmental and a plethora of non black types
of cattle all jumped on the Black Cattle Band Wagon. I will say the American Angus Association have been master marketers of the
breed especially as regards the black color. It goes without saying that a number of members on these pages have drank the nectar
and turned their herds black. I would ask by what standard does color determine the quality of a cow? The only logical answer is
the perception of financial advantage without regard to function. There is little doubt in my mind those most fractured by my
comments will be of the purveyors of the 'Holy Grail of the Blackened Cow'
 

FungusProudKY31

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Known horned and scurred animals in the history of AAA. Holstein got in some accidently and who knows what got added on purpose. The growth fad when heights got out of whack certainly had to have some outside influences.

If the feral cows are able to be tamed they could be useful.
 

Lazy M

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You are spot on KY ! A registered Angus may carry horned genes but a pure Scottish genetic version will not. For this reason I will
not allow any black Angus on the place. I do not have any but I am a life time member of the American Chianina Association since
before they became involved in the Black Angus Polution Venture. Gelbveigh, Saler. Simmental and a plethora of non black types
of cattle all jumped on the Black Cattle Band Wagon. I will say the American Angus Association have been master marketers of the
breed especially as regards the black color. It goes without saying that a number of members on these pages have drank the nectar
and turned their herds black. I would ask by what standard does color determine the quality of a cow? The only logical answer is
the perception of financial advantage without regard to function. There is little doubt in my mind those most fractured by my
comments will be of the purveyors of the 'Holy Grail of the Blackened Cow'
Don't care what color the buyers want, but I will breed for that color and try to raise the best calves possible that fit that criteria. Have fun shaking your fist at the sky and tilting at windmills.
 

TennesseeTuxedo

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You are spot on KY ! A registered Angus may carry horned genes but a pure Scottish genetic version will not. For this reason I will
not allow any black Angus on the place. I do not have any but I am a life time member of the American Chianina Association since
before they became involved in the Black Angus Polution Venture. Gelbveigh, Saler. Simmental and a plethora of non black types
of cattle all jumped on the Black Cattle Band Wagon. I will say the American Angus Association have been master marketers of the
breed especially as regards the black color. It goes without saying that a number of members on these pages have drank the nectar
and turned their herds black. I would ask by what standard does color determine the quality of a cow? The only logical answer is
the perception of financial advantage without regard to function. There is little doubt in my mind those most fractured by my
comments will be of the purveyors of the 'Holy Grail of the Blackened Cow'
Lee, you’re something else, you know that?
 

alacowman1

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A friend is helping neighbors sort and load some cattle that have been almost feral for over 20 years. Minimal winter feed and no doctoring. My friend noticed that there are absolutely no bad eyes in any of cattle. They calve totally on their own. Prettiest set calves in sink with nature. Approximately 15 bulls with 25-30 cows. I wonder what one those bulls would contribute to a herd?
Likely nothing really note worthy other than you could get in a good linebred Bull..unless the user plans to keep his herd feral..once you re domesticate them they will no longer be the animal you were hoping for..
 

Banjo

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Low maintenance should always be the goal with livestock producers, but you can't do it on sagegrass and weeds. Clovers in healthy amounts will just about double your protein and minerals of grass alone.
In keeping your own bulls, you still need to do selective breeding(select your best bulls) or it just becomes a free for all.
 

annmariemz23

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You are spot on KY ! A registered Angus may carry horned genes but a pure Scottish genetic version will not. For this reason I will
not allow any black Angus on the place. I do not have any but I am a life time member of the American Chianina Association since
before they became involved in the Black Angus Polution Venture. Gelbveigh, Saler. Simmental and a plethora of non black types
of cattle all jumped on the Black Cattle Band Wagon. I will say the American Angus Association have been master marketers of the
breed especially as regards the black color. It goes without saying that a number of members on these pages have drank the nectar
and turned their herds black. I would ask by what standard does color determine the quality of a cow? The only logical answer is
the perception of financial advantage without regard to function. There is little doubt in my mind those most fractured by my
comments will be of the purveyors of the 'Holy Grail of the Blackened Cow'
We have black angus mostly cattle. (Commercial) We bred in Gelbvieh because of the incredible hybrid vigor and the gentle temperament. My father-in-law went from Holstein to Angus back when he noticed the Holsteins waited for the feed wagon and the Angus worked harder to graze on their own. This might have just been the particular bunch he bought being raised on rough range. The Angus were smaller and more able to get around in the hills. I don't see the point in glorifying any one breed or color. Horns are a problem because they can use them. The thing about black is that if you have buyers paying more for black, then black is more valuable. Doesn't mean they feed out any better. However, ours feed out right at the top for quality.
 

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