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I have just bought 5 black angus / brangus heifers and one of them apparently doesn't like it's new place. She has been out at least 7 times in the past month. She is between 3-5 months bred and shows no respect for fences. If it doesn't break on the first hit, she'll back and run at it again. Having a tough time deciding to sell her or keep her. She is probably the second best looking heifer I have and will probably throw a pretty calf. Last night she made it about 2 miles down the road into a neighbors herd. Any recommendations to keep or sell.
 

la4angus

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Raider":1q61ifh2 said:
I have just bought 5 black angus / brangus heifers and one of them apparently doesn't like it's new place. She has been out at least 7 times in the past month. She is between 3-5 months bred and shows no respect for fences. If it doesn't break on the first hit, she'll back and run at it again. Having a tough time deciding to sell her or keep her. She is probably the second best looking heifer I have and will probably throw a pretty calf. Last night she made it about 2 miles down the road into a neighbors herd. Any recommendations to keep or sell.
Sell her.
If she gets hit by a car while on the road, you will be a good candidate for a law suit.
I doubt that she is worth that.
 

Craig-TX

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Seven times in one month? I don’t care how good looking she was, she would either be in my hip pocket or my freezer.

Craig-TX
 
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Anonymous

Thanks for the input. Don't know why the decision wasn't easier.

Anybody interested in a heifer????????????? lol.
 

jcarkie

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i had one that would get out and come home before i got home from work
i thought when she calved she would quit. i was wrong she would get out and go visit, then go back. sell her
 

Campground Cattle

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The first time she tore down a fence would have been her last. As soon as she was in a trailer she would be slaughter house bound. As La4 she is a law suit looking for a lawyer.
 

Matt

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Has anyone noticed that she has Angus blood? Call me predjudice, but your better of with Herefords. They're simply calmer (ok, they're to lazy break through a fence, but even still).
 

la4angus

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Matt":qvyqi05o said:
Has anyone noticed that she has Angus blood? Call me predjudice, but your better of with Herefords. They're simply calmer (ok, they're to lazy break through a fence, but even still).
You are right. Herefords have allways been more doccile than the Angus.
 

greenpasture78

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Raider,
Might I suggest you put electric wires to your fences or maybe repair your fences into better conditions. Once knew a guy that complained about his cows getting out, when I went to see his cattle, I see why his cows get out! The fence were in the worst conditions I ever seen....had a hard time keeping from laughing at the idiot... It was shocking that none of the cows gotten onto the highway and killed anyone!

LA, if you think Herfs are better cattle (and they are!) why are you raising Angus? Oh wait, you are blinded by black hide (too much fat in your blood)... Did anyone tell ya that black makes it feel hotter during the summer? Herfs have the white face so they thrive a bit better.. Why raised a predomiantly black hided, naturally heavy bodyfat, cattle? You should be raising light colored, lean (low in bodyfat), and eared cattle in your country (Louisiana)... I am sure your neighbors have a good chuckle watching your black hided cattle try to survive the year round heat... I guess the auction yard in your area is too dumb to know the differences....
 

Oldtimer

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I'll agree that herefords on the average are more docile than angus- you reminded me of back when I was a kid and herefords dominated this area up here. Many of the large ranchers never fed in the winter- it was definitely survival of the fittest and those cows only saw a man at branding time and fall roundup when the calves were sorted off. Sometimes a cow would hide out in a big coulee for a year or two and have a couple years calves following her.

Most of those herefords weighed under 1000 lbs, many had horns and were wilder than any deer. They would see a man on horseback coming from a mile away and be off and running- you'd just try to bunch them and head them in the right direction like herding horses.

The breed is important for docility- but environment plays a role too.
 
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Anonymous

greenpasture78":1xpqsll3 said:
Raider,
Might I suggest you put electric wires to your fences or maybe repair your fences into better conditions. Once knew a guy that complained about his cows getting out, when I went to see his cattle, I see why his cows get out! The fence were in the worst conditions I ever seen....had a hard time keeping from laughing at the idiot... It was shocking that none of the cows gotten onto the highway and killed anyone!


I might have known that someone would have had to comment about repairing the fences (remember I said if it did not break she would back up and try again til she got through)..........(The fences are in good shape). Electric fence might have been a good idea. The heifer went to the sale barn this morning!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Now Greenpasture, your sign offs always say the grass is greener on the other side. However from your opinions and responses to questions, it seems to me that you really believe that the grass is greener only on your side of the fence!!!!!!!!!!!
 

Texan

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Raider":2t68o07c said:
The heifer went to the sale barn this morning!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Raider, you did the right thing. That's a decision you'll never have to look back on.
 

la4angus

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Raider
You may have noticed that GreenPasature wants the Liberals to take all of others peoples GREENBACKS and Redistribute it. Like he says it is always Greener on the Other Side but he wants it to be on His Side.

He also advocates raising buffalo.
 

Double R Ranch

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Wow, this is getting a lot of interesting and what sounds to be some nasty responses. In our area Herefords aren't worth anything at the auction. They are the lowest priced cows. They may be more docile (I really don't have much experience with them) but they aren't where the money is in our area. Plus, white faced cows have such a major problem with pinkeye.
We don't really have fencing issues. We run five rowes of barbed wire and on the fencing that the cows get moved by we run Field fencing, a row of barbed wire on top and a row of hot wire.
If I have a cow that blows (or tries to) blow through a fence it is gone. I have to think about the facts. If they jump fences they cost me fencing repairs, damage to anyone elses stuff, a possible lawsuit and what about if it makes it to the road and gets hit by a car. Drivers around here get killed when they strike a cow or horse. Now you have a death on your hands.
As far as the comments on the black hide and body fat of angus (or cows like it) I have to say that when I go to a meat market or store I DO NOT see any signs that say Grade A USDA choice Hereford. Tender meat and marbling is what the consumer wants. Higher body fat is better for marbling. It is all about the angus. I happen to like the Hereford cow but from a business standpoint it is not profitable in the least. That is why out of 3000+ head that go through the auction every week maybe 30-50 cows are hereford.
I think that it is great if you can raise herefords and make a living at it. But the reality is that it is about the profit and the Hereford isn't it.
I think that every place and person is different and there is no need to get nasty because one person has a different opinion.
 

Campground Cattle

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Double R Ranch":20odoin5 said:
Wow, this is getting a lot of interesting and what sounds to be some nasty responses. In our area Herefords aren't worth anything at the auction. They are the lowest priced cows. They may be more docile (I really don't have much experience with them) but they aren't where the money is in our area. Plus, white faced cows have such a major problem with pinkeye.
We don't really have fencing issues. We run five rowes of barbed wire and on the fencing that the cows get moved by we run Field fencing, a row of barbed wire on top and a row of hot wire.
If I have a cow that blows (or tries to) blow through a fence it is gone. I have to think about the facts. If they jump fences they cost me fencing repairs, damage to anyone elses stuff, a possible lawsuit and what about if it makes it to the road and gets hit by a car. Drivers around here get killed when they strike a cow or horse. Now you have a death on your hands.

Herefords are no more susceptible to pinkeye than Angus that's a bunch of BS. I have got Angus British Whites and Polled Herefords. All cattle are just as susceptible to pinkeye as any other. Sound like the CA buyers aren't quite as smart as the boys down here. Here there looking for quality no matter what color. The Herefords have beat the blacks the two times I have hauled calves to the sale barn this year.
As far as the comments on the black hide and body fat of angus (or cows like it) I have to say that when I go to a meat market or store I DO NOT see any signs that say Grade A USDA choice Hereford. Tender meat and marbling is what the consumer wants. Higher body fat is better for marbling. It is all about the angus. I happen to like the Hereford cow but from a business standpoint it is not profitable in the least. That is why out of 3000+ head that go through the auction every week maybe 30-50 cows are hereford.
I think that it is great if you can raise herefords and make a living at it. But the reality is that it is about the profit and the Hereford isn't it.
I think that every place and person is different and there is no need to get nasty because one person has a different opinion.



Herefords are no more susceptible to pinkeye than Angus that's a bunch of BS. I have got Angus British Whites and Polled Herefords. All cattle are just as susceptible to pinkeye as any other. Sound like the CA buyers aren't quite as smart as the boys down here. Here there looking for quality no matter what color. The Herefords have beat the blacks the two times I have hauled calves to the sale barn this year.
 

Double R Ranch

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You are welcome to your opinion. Keep in mind that people that deal with pinkeye know which animals have problems and which don't.
Your post does say a little about you however.
 

Campground Cattle

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Hereford used to have more problems with cancer eye not pink eye. Breeders have worked hard to rid the breed of this defect. You might be knowledgeable of Angus. But its apparent you don't know cow sh!t from wild honey about Herefords.


PINKEYE
Pinkeye (infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis) is a common infectious disease affecting the eyes of cattle. The name describes the redness and inflammation of the lining of the eyelid and eyeball. Although pinkeye is non-fatal, it has a marked economic impact on the cattle industry. It is known to occur at all seasons of the year and in all breeds of cattle. Pinkeye and foot rot are the two most prevalent conditions affecting all breeding beef females

One or both eyes may be involved. Excessive weeping of the affected eye and closure due to pain are the two signs most commonly observed. As the disease progresses, the cornea becomes cloudy or white. An ulcer (eroded circular spot) frequently develops near the center of the cornea. Cattle with pinkeye keep the affected eye or eyes closed because of pain and to avoid bright sunlight. They lose weight because they are reluctant to forage for feed and water. The course of the infection may run for 4 to 8 weeks, or even longer.

As the eye begins to heal, white scar tissue infiltrates the cornea. In most cases this scar will gradually disappear as healing progresses and vision will be restored. However, in severely affected eyes, a white scar often persists and interferes with vision. If the ulceration is severe enough to penetrate all layers of cells forming the cornea, the fluid in the eyeball will escape. This results in the iris and/or lens protruding partially or entirely through the ulceration. If this occurs, there will be permanent blindness in the affected eye.

Pinkeye is caused by a combination of factors. A good control program should incorporate procedures to reduce initial eye irritation.

An intensive fly control program is essential to limit the spread of pinkeye in a herd of cattle. The insecticide-impregnated plastic ear tags are effective in controlling the horn fly and face fly. These ear tags are also an aid in controlling the stable fly and house fly, and remain effective for up to 5 months. Also sprays, charged backrubbers, and dusts bags are products that can provide chemical control. Manure, weed, and brush management are necessary for total fly control.

Cattle often have grass or weed seeds in their eyes, and these materials no doubt irritate the eye and contribute to the development of pinkeye. Clipping pastures to reduce the amount of tall grass and weeds can be an important management technique in controlling pinkeye.

Ultraviolet light (sun light) - breed for eyelid pigmentation, introduce Brahman influence into the herd, provide shade or tree rows with ample room to prevent overcrowding.

Cattle with pinkeye can be helped by prompt treatment. Most antibiotics in eye sprays are effective in reducing the infection. Many eye sprays also contain an anesthetic to relieve the intense pain due to infection. A dye to act as a filter for some of the light rays is also commonly included and probably gives some protection to the injured eye. The aerosol pinkeye sprays are most effective if applied several times a day.
 

WORANCH

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Ultraviolet light (sun light) - breed for eyelid pigmentation, introduce Brahman influence into the herd,



maybe herefords are more susceptible than some breeds............ :shock:
 

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