loose cattle question

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plbcattle

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I have a couple of cows that have a problem staying put. I know that the best thing is to send them down the road. my question is when these cattle are loose Am I responsible if they get into the neighbors garden and decide they need to dine on some new vegetation. they are getting out on my neighbors fenceline. the fence is on the property line. they installed it years ago and no longer run cattle. I have repaired it way to many times. I heard that in texas there is a law that states the property owner must keep his property fenced as to not keep loose animals from getting onto the property. That doesn't make sense to me but this info is coming from a large old time rancher. i know these cows need a new home but I would like to know iof any of you have had any dealings with this or have any info. thanks
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C & C Land & Catt

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In Oklahoma if your cattle have not been reported out more than 3 times in the last 6 months and documented by somebody there is no legal recourse. I had a cow get out and a guy hit it in his car and sue me. We went to court and he was asking for 150000 in mental and physical damages. After a month he got to pick up my lawyer bill and buy a cow. I don't know the Arkansas laws but you might check into them.
 
A

Anonymous

In Ontario, you are responsible for your cattle to stay fenced at all times. You are wholly responsible for any damage that occurs if they get out. The landowner is responsible for 1/2 of the dividing fence whether they own livestock or not, and a fence viewer is called in to determine who pays what in the matter of a dispute.

I'm very up to date on this because one of my clients had a scrub charolais bull break into their field and breed their donor shorthorn cow who had just been inseminated for a flush...and are in the middle of negotiations for compensation.

Every area is different, and likely depends on the rural power in the legislative body.
 

Campground Cattle

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plbcattle":h8w8ajui said:
I have a couple of cows that have a problem staying put. I know that the best thing is to send them down the road. my question is when these cattle are loose Am I responsible if they get into the neighbors garden and decide they need to dine on some new vegetation. they are getting out on my neighbors fenceline. the fence is on the property line. they installed it years ago and no longer run cattle. I have repaired it way to many times. I heard that in texas there is a law that states the property owner must keep his property fenced as to not keep loose animals from getting onto the property. That doesn't make sense to me but this info is coming from a large old time rancher. i know these cows need a new home but I would like to know iof any of you have had any dealings with this or have any info. thanks
PLBcattle.com

I can't tell you about Ak. but Texas your liable. The thing that struck me is you said their getting through your neighbors fence. Where in the [email protected] is your fence? You need to put a quality fence and keep your cattle on your land no if's and's or butt's. If you were my neighbor you would be getting them out of impound, one phone call to the county stockman a trailer and a couple of dogs would be giving the trespassers a ride.
Again fence your place.
 

dun

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It's trite but true!

Good fences make good neighbors!

Be a good neighbor.

dun
 

WORANCH

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In Arkansas you have to keep your livestock in . Build a good fence. :cboy:
 

Monica

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If it is considered open range area, then it is the parcel owners job to keep the livestock out. Meaning your cows can go where they want when they want and it is not up to you to keep them in the pastures.

If it is not an open range area, then it is your livestock, your job to keep them in or eles it's your liability.

Some people in this area will split the cost of putting in a new fence lines when they are shared lines.
 
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plbcattle

plbcattle

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i need to clarify a little more. the cows are on a place that I rent for my recip cows. I have my registered cows on another place. the landowner of the land or the neighbor should be responsible for the fences if I am renting the land.I still fix fences all the time but it should be the landowners responsibility to repair fences.Is this correct
 

WORANCH

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depends on your lease, but on the land i lease i repair fences . i want my cattle to stay in . i sleep better at night . ;-)
 

ollie

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Not only is the fence bad you are overgrazing. I can't imagine not being able to hold cows in any kind of fence in July. How can you ever get your recips pregnant if you can't even keep them in? What keeps the neighbor bull from breeding them when they're out?
 

Terri

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ollie":i59jwj8j said:
Not only is the fence bad you are overgrazing. I can't imagine not being able to hold cows in any kind of fence in July. How can you ever get your recips pregnant if you can't even keep them in? What keeps the neighbor bull from breeding them when they're out?

How would you know weither or not he was overgrazing? The post doesn't state how many acres he has or the number of cattle. Also some cows just won't stay put if they can manage it. What does it matter what month it is? July is hot but that doesn't mean that a cow won't think the grass is greener on the other side of the fence.

He should make more of an effort to keep his cows on his land. It is the responsibility of the cattle owner to keep his animals where they belong, while I have a fence around my property, its to keep my animals in, not someone elses out. That is what their fence is for. Some people down the road from me just cant seem to keep their gate closed and I have had people put their animals in my yard because they were in front of my house at the time. The police have also come out and I had to explain that they were not my animals and told him where they lived. Not long after that a car hit one of his calves and the people tried to say that it was just an accident that the calf was out but because of all the complaints the police knew the truth. They ended up having to pay for damages to the car, people, and my fence. (The car/calf went through it.)
 

ollie

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Terri":3cs72amz said:
ollie":3cs72amz said:
Not only is the fence bad you are overgrazing. I can't imagine not being able to hold cows in any kind of fence in July. How can you ever get your recips pregnant if you can't even keep them in? What keeps the neighbor bull from breeding them when they're out?

How would you know weither or not he was overgrazing? The post doesn't state how many acres he has or the number of cattle. Also some cows just won't stay put if they can manage it. What does it matter what month it is? July is hot but that doesn't mean that a cow won't think the grass is greener on the other side of the fence.

He should make more of an effort to keep his cows on his land. It is the responsibility of the cattle owner to keep his animals where they belong, while I have a fence around my property, its to keep my animals in, not someone elses out. That is what their fence is for. Some people down the road from me just cant seem to keep their gate closed and I have had people put their animals in my yard because they were in front of my house at the time. The police have also come out and I had to explain that they were not my animals and told him where they lived. Not long after that a car hit one of his calves and the people tried to say that it was just an accident that the calf was out but because of all the complaints the police knew the truth. They ended up having to pay for damages to the car, people, and my fence. (The car/calf went through it.)
Because in Arkansas this has been one of the most lush years. He made reference to cows as in more than one. Most of the time in my experience, except for the ocasional rogue, cattle will stay in the pasture they are in unless they are hungry. Also in my experience , people with cattle out aren't very good pasture managers. As much money as it costs to set up a set of recips I can't imagine having them where you can't hold them.
 

Terri

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This year has been extremely wet in S. Texas as well, but I still had 2 steers that would jump the fence to go to the cows across the street. Just because there is grass doesn't mean there gonna stay. By the way, I have 60 acres and 8 cows. The two steers wern't alone, just not happy where they were. I have a 5 foot 5 strand barbedwire fence that is only 3 years old. Its in perfect shape, and the pasture is belly deep in grass. One of those steers even managed to get over the side of an open stock trailer after the auction.

And all the ranchers I know would take offense in your comment that cattle people arn't very good pasture managers. Thats their business, if they don't have grass, they don't make anything. Kinda hard to live that way.
 
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plbcattle

plbcattle

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there are 50 cows on 80 acres of rotated grazed pastures. there is plenty of grass. I supplement 8lbs of grain everyday per head. Its not a lack of food. I wasn't meaning to start anything just asking if others have had any similar experiences and how it was handled. thanks
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ollie

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PLB I have a similiar situation on one of my lease places where there is cattle only on my side and no fence if they get our. If it's only one side of an 80 then 1/2 mile of single strand electric fence and battery powerd charger should cure the problem. If it's a long term lease ask the land owner if he would let 2000.00 of the lease go to putting in a new fence.
 
A

Anonymous

Vicki the Vet":3jawmhuy said:
In Ontario, you are responsible for your cattle to stay fenced at all times. You are wholly responsible for any damage that occurs if they get out. The landowner is responsible for 1/2 of the dividing fence whether they own livestock or not, and a fence viewer is called in to determine who pays what in the matter of a dispute.

I'm very up to date on this because one of my clients had a scrub charolais bull break into their field and breed their donor shorthorn cow who had just been inseminated for a flush...and are in the middle of negotiations for compensation.

Every area is different, and likely depends on the rural power in the legislative body.
 

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