Longhorns

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

I found some longhorn cows for sale at a good price and I am considering buying them. What kind of calves could expect to get with my black angus bull? Will they have horns and spots? Will they calve as easy as they did with the longhorn herd bull? Any advice would be appreciated!

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

You pose some tough questions...lol.

To the best of my knowledge, breeding a Longhorn bull to one of the polled continental breeds will produce a polled offspring. With Longhorn blood, about any color can appear in a calf.

Genetics and quality in Longhorns is more predectible when using pureblood Longhorns. If the Longhorns you are considering have any cross-breed blood in them, then prediction of calves would be considerably difficult. Some Longhorn "breeders" do not selectively breed--some will put a Longhorn bull in their pasture with X number of LH cows--you get Longhorns calves.

Calving ease and low birthweight calves (45 to 65 lbs on average) are inherent in Longhorns. On the other hand, temperament, milking and mothering ability, conformation, horn length, fertility, good hip shape, etc., will all depend on the genetics and quality of the Longhorn sires and dams.

As far as prices go (based on market observations, private treaty sales, etc.), a dquality Longhorn calf should be worth at least $800 when it hits the ground. Quality heifers and young cows (not talking about tremendous horn length and showing successes here) should probably be in the $1,000 to $2,500 range. High quality brood cows are running $5,000 to $25,000; and, some high quality calves are in the $1,500 to 3,500 range. Compare these figures with what your potential seller is charging for his/her Longhorns. You might want to check out the ITLA Sale Pen internet advs for some examples at: <A HREF="http://www.itla.com" TARGET="_blank">www.itla.com</A>

Hope this info is helpful to you! Bill Running Arrow Farm

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

If your Angus bull is black and registered with the American Angus Association, chances are you'll get black calves. The AAA identifies any bull known to be a red gene carrier by marking their registration papers. But you're likely to get some spotted calves out of those Longhorn cows. A friend of mine had a Longhorn cow that was a family "pet." They kept all her daughters as replacement females in the herd. He's been using Angus bulls for years and still occasionally gets a spotted calf out of the cow's daughters and granddaughters. He sells those spotted calves separately from his solid and BWF calves because spotted calves take such a hit at the sale barn. A registered Angus bull should sire polled (no horns) calves.

> I found some longhorn cows for
> sale at a good price and I am
> considering buying them. What kind
> of calves could expect to get with
> my black angus bull? Will they
> have horns and spots? Will they
> calve as easy as they did with the
> longhorn herd bull? Any advice
> would be appreciated!
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> You pose some tough
> questions...lol.

> To the best of my knowledge,
> breeding a Longhorn bull to one of
> the polled continental breeds will
> produce a polled offspring. With
> Longhorn blood, about any color
> can appear in a calf.

> Genetics and quality in Longhorns
> is more predectible when using
> pureblood Longhorns. If the
> Longhorns you are considering have
> any cross-breed blood in them,
> then prediction of calves would be
> considerably difficult. Some
> Longhorn "breeders" do
> not selectively breed--some will
> put a Longhorn bull in their
> pasture with X number of LH
> cows--you get Longhorns calves.

> Calving ease and low birthweight
> calves (45 to 65 lbs on average)
> are inherent in Longhorns. On the
> other hand, temperament, milking
> and mothering ability,
> conformation, horn length,
> fertility, good hip shape, etc.,
> will all depend on the genetics
> and quality of the Longhorn sires
> and dams.

> As far as prices go (based on
> market observations, private
> treaty sales, etc.), a dquality
> Longhorn calf should be worth at
> least $800 when it hits the
> ground. Quality heifers and young
> cows (not talking about tremendous
> horn length and showing successes
> here) should probably be in the
> $1,000 to $2,500 range. High
> quality brood cows are running
> $5,000 to $25,000; and, some high
> quality calves are in the $1,500
> to 3,500 range. Compare these
> figures with what your potential
> seller is charging for his/her
> Longhorns. You might want to check
> out the ITLA Sale Pen internet
> advs for some examples at:
> <A HREF="http://www.itla.com" TARGET="_blank">www.itla.com</A> Hope this info is
> helpful to you! Bill Running Arrow
> Farm

Where do the longhorns bring that kind of money and do they have to be registered?



[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> If your Angus bull is black and
> registered with the American Angus
> Association, chances are you'll
> get black calves. The AAA
> identifies any bull known to be a
> red gene carrier by marking their
> registration papers. But you're
> likely to get some spotted calves
> out of those Longhorn cows. A
> friend of mine had a Longhorn cow
> that was a family "pet."
> They kept all her daughters as
> replacement females in the herd.
> He's been using Angus bulls for
> years and still occasionally gets
> a spotted calf out of the cow's
> daughters and granddaughters. He
> sells those spotted calves
> separately from his solid and BWF
> calves because spotted calves take
> such a hit at the sale barn. A
> registered Angus bull should sire
> polled (no horns) calves.

Thanks for the feedback Frankie, thats in line with what I was told @ the Angus farm where I bought my bull



[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Yes, these are for registered Longhorns. These prices have occurred at specialty Longhorn Auction Sales, including the "Longhorn Showcase" sales and others. To see some sale sources, goto <A HREF="http://www.tlbaa.org" TARGET="_blank">www.tlbaa.org</A> or <A HREF="http://www.itla.org" TARGET="_blank">www.itla.org</A> for association websites.

Otherwise, the "lower prices" $800 to $5,000 are frequently advertised via Private Treaty by the respective Longhorn breeders. You can search your browser for "Texas Longhorns, Texas" to find number of good websites.

If a Longhorn is offered for under $800 as a calf (or other age) it may or may not be registered and is probably due to a serious breeder overstock sale. Any Longhorns at a local "Sale Barn" are probably not registered and have a variety of bloodlines (blends) of non-famous sires and dams; and/or are dams that aren't producing well, or others that might have an attitude problem. Anyone one selling Longhorns at a Sale Barn will usually always take a serious price hit there.

On another note, the very high priced longhorns often are part of an Invitational Longhorn Sale or other high profile auctions where breeders are seeking specific bloodlines (esp. horn length) to add to their foundation stock. Even a 10 year old Longhorn cow can still have 6 to 10 more calves before she "retires."

Sometimes breeders sell top quality Longhorns bulls because they have worked through the bulls in their herd, have already collected semen to store, and move the bulls out to make room for even bigger and better bulls.

Bottomline: ANY registered bovine will be sold per "Each"; non-registered (non-foundation stock) will be sold per "Pound." The small cost of registration for a quality animal will create several times the price of a non-registered animal.

Final note: ANY bovine that is offered for sale (regardless of the breed) that the owner or breeder DOES NOT know who the sire or dam was OR when the calving date was; well...consider this animal as just a male or female bovine who may or may not have a service life left and who may be only worth their dressed weight in "Beef."

[email protected]
 

Latest posts

Top