longhorns

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Anonymous

First off it is impossible for lean beef to have more flavor than well marbled beef. The intramuscular fat is where you get the flavor when you cook it. You will have to add pork fat to the longhorn hamburger to even get it to stick together. As far as healthier bullsh*t. Organ beef again bullsh*t. Your spewing out your own unresearched opinions as facts and you yourself are a detrement to the beef industry. I wish you longhorn breeders would stick to raising your longhorns for the only thing their good for, PARADES. ENUF SAID.

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Anonymous

Black "power"...I'm sorry you cannot post a civil and people-friendly reply to anyone that is doing something different than you do. You obviously have little tolerance for other's opinions and for anyone that disagrees with you philosophy, or, at least, your candor could use a little more tact.

I will agree that VERY lean meat does not have enough "fat" in it to cook well by itself. On the other hand, that doesn't inherently make "very lean meat" meat "bad" or sinful, or whatever.

In good common courtesy to human conversation, we can all agree or disagree with other's opinions without slamming others' opinions. You have made it well clear on all of your posts on this board that you are ANGUS, ANGUS, ANGUS. That's ok. On the other hand, other Angus and other breeders seem to refrain from seriously attacking others' opinions and programs. Maybe you need to find some land somewhere and start your own Country??? Then, you can be in charge of all your subjects...until they revolt??? P.S.: Does your handle, "Blackpower", have a subliminal message in it????



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Anonymous

I do not agree with Black power in total but he(as bad as i hate to say it) Has some valid points...I got into raising cattle so I would know what I was eating...No hormones,or chemicals. I also do not fatten my killers, grass hay and a little corn to lean them up. Cattle reguardless of the breed do not have to be over fat animals. My Black Angus and crosses produce well fo me and I like there beef, well enought not to hunt for a lean Beef breed.. I think that feed lots push there cattle by over feeding ,hormones, and other chemicals, there lies the problem, not the breeds... All breeds could be thin lean breeds if selected that way..they are not because there is a desire / want for marble meat, prehaps a demand for it... I agree I do not like the overfat meats/beef found in the stores.. It just ain't as good...But I am open minded and I would like to try ya'll beef..So when we going to have a BBQ ?... ALF...I love to try some Longhorn, and maybeBlack Power would bring so of his beef so we could try...I bet cooked right , all ya'll beef is good.

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Anonymous

> John what bull or breed should I
> breed my angus cows to to get this
> promised 150 plus LB extra weaning
> weight? I want most of the females
> replacement quality since I do not
> buy in replacements. I want no
> frame creep, or increased calving
> problems and steers to grade
> choice at slaughter. I would like
> to cash in on this promised hybrid
> vigor of your statement (below).

> pat

Don't forget Scottish Highland cattle for commerical crosses. A new breed Bazadaise holds much potential for the heart healthy lean beef consumer. Both breeds are truly poor mans cattle, adapted to harsh conditions and poor feeds.

Another note: Bison fed commercial feeds increase cholesterol levels exceding commercial beef, 77mg/100gms cattle to Bison 82 mg/100gms.

The fellows downunder are benefiting from 1.5 million Grant project supporting Bazadaise. Nearly half the countries genetics were reciently stolen...

My input for new genetics is combining Highland-Angus-Belain blue, I call the breed a Diarmid cow, it comes in 13 colors types, is grass fed, has low cholesterol, the animals are docile and do not need growth stimulants or antibiotics... I call this Better Beef by Design. (http://www.blueoxfarms.com ).

People are welcome to come walk the fields and see for themselves if the idea has potential, we live in Northern Minnesota.

The potential here I believe is to produce a long lived low input commerical cow, with the added benefit of a terminal cross for the commercial containment feed lot. Which the market and consumer are stuck with until system and production methods are changed by the consumer and the purchasing of Heart Healthy Beef.

Beef is still one of the safest meat sources, converting grasses without concentration of toxins... fish, poltry and pork utilze other sources for feed, resulting in increased concentration of Biotoxins.

Mass production of food likes one breed performance. It results in a fast sameness of product. The Angus people have worked hard to end up on top, which is rewarded currently by volume presence on the store.

Hereford will nearly always win restaurant or cooking taste contests and a well fed Highland animal will set a new standard, but they do not fit any of the marketing conditions and will be a speciality beef for the people in the know.

A great deal of commercial beef is Holstien... if its black its concidered Angus. There's lots of room out there for new breed usage. Galloway come to mind as well, yet remain obscure?



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Anonymous

My family raises Longhorn & crosses. We eat both and I prefer the Longhorn meat to any other. We do not allow the meat packer to add any fat to our hamburger - he thought we were crazy! But it holds together just fine. You must learn how to cook Longhorn meat including the hamburger. Overcooking it will make it terribly tough and tasteless. It takes much less time to cook the Longhorn meat than more fatty beef.

I highly recommend the "Texas Longhorn Cookbook & campfire tales" from the TLBAA (check it out at amazon.com for the best price). Also, the scientific research regarding Longhorn meat prove that Longhorn meat contains less cholestrol than chicken breast does. This is a definite added bonus for us!

I've tried all types of beef including Angus and I will take Longhorn over any of it. It has a great flavor, it's got way less fat, and it's healthier for me and my family.

I know that other cattle breeds can be made lean as well - my dad did it with herefords for years. But the Longhorn is naturally lean, and naturally posses a lot of other good qualities such as calving ease, survival on little food or water, great milk production, and they pass on great genetics to each generation.

I cherish opinions - both informed and uninformed. I can appreciate the informed opinion much more. So if you haven't eaten Longhorn, why not give it a try before you condemn it?

I love the Longhorn breed but to each his own. God bless.



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Anonymous

My problem with Longhorns is your favorite part. Guess that's why we have so many breeds. Longhorns produce beef with less cholestrol than some other breeds because they don't marble. Cholestrol is fat (or marbling). The more marbling a carcass contains, the higher it's value in the commercial cattle market. Packers pay more for marbled beef, retailers pay more for marbled beef and consumers are willing to pay more for marbled beef. Right or wrong, that's the truth. There are several studies that tell us Select (lower quality beef) is more likely to be tough than Choice beef (marbling, again). The bottom line is that producers who raise marbled beef for the commercial cattle market are more likely to make money than those that raise "lean" beef for the commercial cattle market. Current beef checkoff funded research tells us that ANY lean beef is comparable to chicken breast in cholestrol and contains more vitamins and minerals than chicken.

My family raises Longhorn &
> crosses. We eat both and I prefer
> the Longhorn meat to any other. We
> do not allow the meat packer to
> add any fat to our hamburger - he
> thought we were crazy! But it
> holds together just fine. You must
> learn how to cook Longhorn meat
> including the hamburger.
> Overcooking it will make it
> terribly tough and tasteless. It
> takes much less time to cook the
> Longhorn meat than more fatty
> beef.

> I highly recommend the "Texas
> Longhorn Cookbook & campfire
> tales" from the TLBAA (check
> it out at amazon.com for the best
> price). Also, the scientific
> research regarding Longhorn meat
> prove that Longhorn meat contains
> less cholestrol than chicken
> breast does. This is a definite
> added bonus for us!

> I've tried all types of beef
> including Angus and I will take
> Longhorn over any of it. It has a
> great flavor, it's got way less
> fat, and it's healthier for me and
> my family.

> I know that other cattle breeds
> can be made lean as well - my dad
> did it with herefords for years.
> But the Longhorn is naturally
> lean, and naturally posses a lot
> of other good qualities such as
> calving ease, survival on little
> food or water, great milk
> production, and they pass on great
> genetics to each generation.

> I cherish opinions - both informed
> and uninformed. I can appreciate
> the informed opinion much more. So
> if you haven't eaten Longhorn, why
> not give it a try before you
> condemn it?

> I love the Longhorn breed but to
> each his own. God bless.
 
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A

Anonymous

Thanks for the informed opinion. And I suppose all you said is true regarding the large commercial cattle breeder. That's why we're small and cater to the local beef eaters who seem to prefer the lean over the marbled. Also, education is helping to create a small change in local attitude. We'll see what happens. Thanks.



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OP
A

Anonymous

> My family raises Longhorn &
> crosses. We eat both and I prefer
> the Longhorn meat to any other. We
> do not allow the meat packer to
> add any fat to our hamburger - he
> thought we were crazy! But it
> holds together just fine. You must
> learn how to cook Longhorn meat
> including the hamburger.
> Overcooking it will make it
> terribly tough and tasteless. It
> takes much less time to cook the
> Longhorn meat than more fatty
> beef.

> I highly recommend the "Texas
> Longhorn Cookbook & campfire
> tales" from the TLBAA (check
> it out at amazon.com for the best
> price). Also, the scientific
> research regarding Longhorn meat
> prove that Longhorn meat contains
> less cholestrol than chicken
> breast does. This is a definite
> added bonus for us!

> I've tried all types of beef
> including Angus and I will take
> Longhorn over any of it. It has a
> great flavor, it's got way less
> fat, and it's healthier for me and
> my family.

> I know that other cattle breeds
> can be made lean as well - my dad
> did it with herefords for years.
> But the Longhorn is naturally
> lean, and naturally posses a lot
> of other good qualities such as
> calving ease, survival on little
> food or water, great milk
> production, and they pass on great
> genetics to each generation.

> I cherish opinions - both informed
> and uninformed. I can appreciate
> the informed opinion much more. So
> if you haven't eaten Longhorn, why
> not give it a try before you
> condemn it?

> I love the Longhorn breed but to
> each his own. God bless.

I just got my first taste of Longhorn about three weeks ago. Four of us went in on one. The guy we bought him from wanted to grain him for awhile for us, But I thought the idea was to keep him lean so he picked out the one wih the best carcass for us and we made the deal. He gave us a .10 per lb for not graining him. I find the meat to be juicy with excellent flavor for not having eny fat in it. The chuck steak was a little gristly. You are right about overcooking making it tough and it is easy to over cook. Although not as tender as some fatty meat I noticed it doesn't leave me feeling blozay afterwards like the fatty meats do. Our biggest complaint is that the hamburger is greasy. The butcher added fat to it even though we asked for no fat to be added. All in all I am happy with the Longhorn meat and will go back to the guy I bought from, but may change butchers. I'm going to ask my sister for the cook book for my birthday. Thanks!

Griff
 

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