longhorns

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Anonymous

> Why are longhorns so important to
> Texas?

In Texas tradition, longhorns were some of the first cattle on the open range and the impetus for the famous cattle drives of the Chisolm and Goodnight trails, among others. They were also one of the primary breeds that were driven by the tens of thousands to mid-western markets and markets to supply beef to the beef-hungry Easterners decades ago.

Longhorn cattle are the "symbol of the West" (also "Where The West Begins"--one of the mottos of Ft Worth, Texas) which has a Longhorn skull and horns image for their Ft Worth, Texas city logo.

As hardy, survivalist cattle with a 500 year or so history in the USA, they became a symbol of the open range and of the early "cowboy movies" which depicted the years ago image of the "wild and wooly" horned cattle (which of course is no longer their image).

To condemn "Texas Longhorns" in Texas is like condemming Texas Oil, Texas Beef (as Oprah learned quite well in Amarillo, TX), and Texans "Right To Carry" (one of the 34 states that license individuals for concealed carry) as their Second Amendment right. Many businesses and some other organizations use the "Longhorn" as their symbol or Logo. What can I say? Longhorns in Texas are a tradition as much as the early Spindletop Oil fields, early cattle drives, and wide open spaces West of I-35W. In the historic Stockyards District of Ft Worth, they have a daily Longhorn cattle drive through the streets of the District with City riders saddled on very tame Longhorn Steers. During the day, you can see these steers on display in the Mall areas of the Stockyards district with their wrangler---the steers are merely tied to a hitchin post on the street.

On the flip side, Texas also boasts thousands of Black Angus, Herefords, cross-breeds and related beef breeds which drive the commercial cattle industry in Texas. The Texas Longhorn is an icon, held sacred by some (as is the Brahman in India), as well as a growing and pricey specialty market industry with breeders ranging from a "weekend city farmer with one trophy steer in his/her front yard" to Longhorn operations in the multi-million dollar bracket. And, due to their adaptability to nearly every climate in the world, they are found in numerous foreign countries.



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Anonymous

> They're not important

YEEHAW! Keep riding cowboy! Knowledge is power. Money is power. Beef is power.

Until you have all (or most of) the facts...try not to put down or condemn others... Suggest two websites to increase your education: <A HREF="http://www.itla.com" TARGET="_blank">www.itla.com</A> and <A HREF="http://www.tlbaa.com" TARGET="_blank">www.tlbaa.com</A>

"Everybody is right some of the time... most everybody is right more of the time... and nobody is right all of the time...."

Peace!



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Anonymous

> Why are longhorns so important to
> Texas? Another historical reason is that they had a huge part in putting Texas' economy back on its feet ater the Civil War..Texas was "reconstructed" faster than any other State in the Confederacy. Those boys came home, busted their butts to gather all those wild cattle & trailed them up North to a beef-starved population, thereby earning enough to rebuild their ranches after 4 years of neglect.

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Anonymous

> They're not important

I understand their importance in beginning ranching in Texas, it's because they were FREE. Today they are nothing but a novelty animal, something to look at. I've had Longhorn beef, it's dry and tasteless, with so many good beef breeds out their i don't understand why these people are hell bent to make a carcass animal out of something that is certainly not one. ANGUS ANGUS ANGUS

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Anonymous

Glad you're still around kickin' Black Power! Longhorn beef, due to its naturally lean nature, cannot be cooked like an overly fat marbled beef animal. The way you are obsessive with ANGUS, ANGUS, ANGUS, reminds me of why I left the Baptist Church after leaving home at 17---they don't think there is any other religion! And, everyone else is going to H--L. You stick to what you know best (Angus) and the other people with work with the other 349 breeds of cattle around the world. "A closed mind is a terrible thing to waste...."

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Anonymous

I am open -minded more than you Red Necks would like.(If the Red-Neck fits wear it).Less be real there are many breeds that work in many places. The long horn had its place, and through selection, and culling , they may have a place in a cross breeding program in the furture...I also bet the Texas rancher were very glad to put a big Hereford Bull on them poor, sorry longhorn cows... Just think of the improvement of them sorry cows...I also bet the image of Texas was not as important to the texas rancher as the improvement of them poor ,sorry longhorn cows...Now Long Horn breeders keep breeding , as for me I will breed Black Angus and crosses of it.Add a little Brangus,or Cont. and bang the best Beef for the Buck.. Flexiable, Open minded Breeding program ready to adapt to the furture market , now the distance past....ALF

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Anonymous

Longhorns do one or two things better than ANY other breed. There is no one thing that Angus do better than ANY other breed.
 
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Anonymous

John S.

Please tell us what your chosen breed or cross is. Angus may not be perfect but they have work hard to promote a good eating experience for beef consumers thru CAB.

pat

> Longhorns do one or two things
> better than ANY other breed. There
> is no one thing that Angus do
> better than ANY other breed.
 
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Anonymous

Did I say I have a "choosen" breed? I have a preferred food = beef. CAB? NO, I prefer to know what I am consuming. As you may have noticed, I have little patience for Angus breeders "attitude", a little like their cattle.
 
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Anonymous

Everyone has an opinion. Even if I agreed (and I don't) that Angus don't do any one thing better than any other breed, they are near the top of the list for ALL pracical, economic traits, easy calving, fertility, maternal, feed efficiency, quality carcass. That's why they have become so popular. They're not a single trait breed.

Longhorns do one or two things
> better than ANY other breed. There
> is no one thing that Angus do
> better than ANY other breed.
 
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Anonymous

I read alot of arguments against the Black color that so many non-black cattle have taken on.I think the traits listed above for the Black Angus is the reason you see the black in non-black breeds. Of course are there any non-black breeds left? Less see -Black Limms,Simms, Gelveihs,Branvails, Even Black Herefords, less not forget Black nosed Char. So my question is if BLACK ANGUS does not have something that makes them special(as a beef breed) , then why is the world of cattle turning black????ALF

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Anonymous

I would also like to say this, I truly enjoy this board and the opions on it.I really do not want to offend any one , all thought at times I find it hard not to..I am glad there are so many different type of cow out there and hope it stays that way... Every one has his/hers on thing. I enjoy my cows, my live does not depend on them or there income, I do enjoy eating them...alf

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Anonymous

> I understand their importance in
> beginning ranching in Texas, it's
> because they were FREE. Today they
> are nothing but a novelty animal,
> something to look at. I've had
> Longhorn beef, it's dry and
> tasteless, with so many good beef
> breeds out their i don't
> understand why these people are
> hell bent to make a carcass animal
> out of something that is certainly
> not one. ANGUS ANGUS ANGUS

After reading your post I talked with a friend of mine at the gym. He is a heart sergen and performs open heart surgery four days of the week. According to him you can have a quality life or end up in a pine box. He recommends lean Longhorn beef, or buffalo over fatty Angus meat. He said as long as people snort Cocaine and eat fatty meat like Angus he will be able to afford two homes in the Islands and a leer jet.

I have never eaten Longhorn or buffalo, but with high blood pressure running in the family I should start if I want to see the other side of forty. Maybe Longhorns aren't for everyone, but it dosen't sound like Angus are either!
 
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Anonymous

just one comment though: the world cattle population is not turning black. in belgium alone there are more then 2 million heads of cattle, and not even one percent is black. go figure.

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Anonymous

> Thanks Griff for posting another perspective on the eating of lean, low cholesterol/fat beef (or meat, for that matter). As you well know, there have been a number of studies on this subject. Agree, Longhorn beef isn't for everyone (as well as Angus isn't either). The same comparison relates to some people like to eat well-marbled meat with some fat attached; others, only can stand to eat VERY LEAN mean with no visible fat (I'm one of the "lean" guys too). Any good cook knows that you can ruin a prime rib steak or a hamburger steak if you cook either wrong. I personally think the world would be better off if we ate more lean beef and less obvious fatty meat---God only knows that the USA is seriously overweight with no end in sight!

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Anonymous

You guys need to get on the internet and read some current research on the Adkins diet. Several recent studies have shown that people lost more weight on the Adkins diet while IMPROVING their good cholesterol level and at least maintaining their overall cholesterol levels as compared to the American Heart Assn diet. Here’s a link one article on a study done at Duke University (http://www.adkins-diet.org/) and there have been several other studies. An article in the New York Times discussing recent research on the high fat-low carb diet was headlined "What if it's all been a big fat lie." In fact, the Adkins diet is so promising that the Feds are paying for a large, long term study. Some medical researchers are coming to the conclusion that heart disease is related more to genetics than diet. But the medical community has been preaching this low-fat theory for years and has been slow to make any changes in recommendations. Americans in the US have been on a low fat-high carb diet for 20 years and we have more obese people than ever before. Only now that we have such an obesity problem here in the US are doctors taking a serious look at the Adkins diet and finding out that (1) it works and (2) people are more likely to stay on it than conventional diets. BTW, beef demand started dropping about the time the USDA lowered grading standards. A lot of things happened about that time, but I'm convinced people stopped eating as much beef at least partly because they just don't like lean beef as well as marbled beef. Programs like CAB started providing marbled beef to those willing to pay for it. Consumers tell us time after time that they prefer Choice (marbling) beef to Select, but there’s generally not enough Choice beef, thus the current $15-16 Choice/Select price spread. What a deal if the scientific community can prove marbled beef is good for you and consumers already love it!!
 
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Anonymous

I think one could make a case that there’s more Angus beef sold worldwide than any other breed. According to Dr. Darrel Peel from Ok State University, thirty percent (30%) of the world’s beef is produced on the North American Continent, Mexico, US and Canada. A CattleFax survey a few years ago showed over 60% of the cow herds in the US have Angus influence. The American Angus Assn. expects that to reach 80% in the next 5-10 years. Canada’s beef industry is only about 12% the size of the US and they’re turning black, too. Does anyone know the percentage? I don’t know how Mexico’s beef industry compares to the US, but Dr. Peel says that Mexican cattlemen are receiving the “same sharp marketing signals about the color of hide, quality of cattle, frame size…” as US cattlemen are receiving. Mexican cattlemen are as smart as US and Canadian cattlemen. They’ll figure out what works in their environment and management program and I’ll bet many of them can and will use Angus genetics.

> just one comment though: the world
> cattle population is not turning
> black. in belgium alone there are
> more then 2 million heads of
> cattle, and not even one percent
> is black. go figure.
 

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