Longhorn as a recip

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Cada22

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I have done some research on the subject with fewer results than I anticipated. Anyone use any longhorns as recips? Would be low to moderate BW Angus or Simangus embryos going into smaller frame longhorn cows. Anyone have any experience? Could there be any positives in this scenario?
 

Bigfoot

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Experience with putting embryos in longhorns is zero. Quit a bit of experience with longhorns. I don't think I would do it. I'd sight the potential higher than normal birth weight, and milking ability. Some longhorns milk better than others.
 

midTN_Brangusman

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I have also considered this. Seems to be more pros than cons. Longhorn cattle in general are good milkers and easy calvers. Not to mention they are cheap. Since the recip cow does affect bw, don't see them having calving issues to sim-angus calves.
 
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Cada22

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midTN_Brangusman":5s1gz616 said:
I have also considered this. Seems to be more pros than cons. Longhorn cattle in general are good milkers and easy calvers. Not to mention they are cheap. Since the recip cow does affect bw, don't see them having calving issues to sim-angus calves.

I tend to agree with you on this. I think they should be able to handle 75-80 pound calves and the better milkers could support a calf that size
 

True Grit Farms

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What are you expecting to do with the calves out of the recips? The embryos we're putting in, we think are our best matings. And you need a good heavy milking recip, so if it's a bull calf the calf will make weight to be eligible for a lot of the registered sales. Believe it or not a Holstein makes a great reip cow.
 
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Cada22

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True Grit Farms":2puv60de said:
What are you expecting to do with the calves out of the recips? The embryos we're putting in, we think are our best matings. And you need a good heavy milking recip, so if it's a bull calf the calf will make weight to be eligible for a lot of the registered sales. Believe it or not a Holstein makes a great reip cow.

Long term plan is to build a registered herd through ET and sell the longhorn recips if we go that route.
 
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Cada22

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True Grit Farms":16pay9vr said:
What are you expecting to do with the calves out of the recips? The embryos we're putting in, we think are our best matings. And you need a good heavy milking recip, so if it's a bull calf the calf will make weight to be eligible for a lot of the registered sales. Believe it or not a Holstein makes a great reip cow.

Long term plan is to build a registered herd through ET and sell the longhorn recips if we go that route.
 

Bright Raven

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Maybe Fire Sweep can add something. But the Owens Brothers Simmentals have used Longhorn and even corrienta, I believe. Those guys are not amateurs so it has some merit.
 

Jake

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I would think the handling issues would be enough to make it not worth the effort. Couldn't take a load of cows to just any embryologist as they likely aren't set up to handle the horns
 

ALACOWMAN

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Jake":2o06swn4 said:
I would think the handling issues would be enough to make it not worth the effort. Couldn't take a load of cows to just any embryologist as they likely aren't set up to handle the horns
. Don't know that it's typical of them...but the ones I've seen, can leap like deer,,and were a little flighty...
 

Jake

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ALACOWMAN":3zx7t6mg said:
Jake":3zx7t6mg said:
I would think the handling issues would be enough to make it not worth the effort. Couldn't take a load of cows to just any embryologist as they likely aren't set up to handle the horns
. Don't know that it's typical of them...but the ones I've seen, can leap like deer,,and were a little flighty...

There is also some level of amniotic exchange. Enough that a piece of that recip is left with that calf. If sure want to use the best recip possible.
 

5S Cattle

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ALACOWMAN":23h6rjaa said:
Jake":23h6rjaa said:
I would think the handling issues would be enough to make it not worth the effort. Couldn't take a load of cows to just any embryologist as they likely aren't set up to handle the horns
. Don't know that it's typical of them...but the ones I've seen, can leap like deer,,and were a little flighty...
:nod:
 

xbredcattle

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Seems like a rancher in North Ms was using longhorn/jersey recips for a PB Angus operation....think he had mixed results
Lack of milk was never an issue though
 

Lucky_P

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While using beef cattle of unknown source as recips is not without risk, I'm convinced that many beef seedstock operations introduced Johne's Disease into their herds by using dairy cows as recips.
We know that at least 25% of calves born to Johnes-infected cows are infected in utero, and those cows shed the organism in their milk/colostrum and feces... calves born to Johne's cows are 10X more likely to be/become infected than calves in the same herd born to non-JD-infected cows.

Our diagnostic tests for JD are still not great for those cows that have not yet begun to exhibit clinical disease or shed organisms in their feces. They may look clinically normal, and may test negative on serum and feces... but 6 months, 1 year, 2 years later... may be positive.
 

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