Longevity

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KANSAS

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People talk about longhorns having longevity producing into their late teens to early twenties. Is this just because their teeth hold up better than most other breeds?
 

SEC

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I would say it's because they weren't selected to the degree that beef cattle were for higher weaning wts, ywt, etc. They have been left to be survivors longer than maybe any other breed.
 

Ryan

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I think disese resistance can play role in this, too. they are known for being very disease resistant, so in turn their immune systems do not break down or decrease in effectiveness as much as other breeds might over the lifetime of the cow.

I think there are many factors to their longevity.... also coming to mind is that they were open range cattle where it was survival of the fittest and the stronger ones lived longer.
 
A

Anonymous

We regularly have cows breed up til they are 16 to 18 years. I think it's a genetic thing as well as environment.
 

Bek

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Like Carla said, most people here breed to calve at 2. However we like to have them calving at a little over 2, at the earliest.
 

purecountry

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Good topic here. I find it amazing how the best judge of efficient grazing animals, no matter how many trials we do or how much research we document, is still good old Mother Nature. There's no denying she has the best eye for stock.
 

Australian Cattleman

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We seldom ever join our females before they are two. They grow much better when they are allowed to get over the adolescent stage. With breeds like ours there is plenty of time to have a long breeding life. So whats missed out presumably at the beginning you gain at the end.
Environmental factors are a big consideration,availabilty of feed etc.
Colin
 

dun

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Australian Cattleman":3k0gz9bl said:
They grow much better when they are allowed to get over the adolescent stage.

Ours are all british and mature at 1300-1500 lbs, carry good flesh, wean good calves, and they all calve at 23-24 months. I sure don;t think I'ld want thme to "grow better".
Genetics and selection! Frnstance, weaned at 560 (drought year) bred @ 1036 (still a drought year) calved @ 1204 23 months of age.

dun
 

andybob

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With the average type of native grazing here I wouldn't expect to have to cull for teeth wear before 15 years with Tuli, and an appreciable number should go to 20 years, I had really hard grazing in Africa,but my in-laws on similar grass to what I have here in N.C. have cows well over 20 years in their stud.
 
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