Lifespan of Bull?

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Anonymous

This is just a quick question that I realized I didn't (along with many other things) know even after growing up on a farm. How long will a herd bull usually live if allowed to go until he drops? My dad (retired) has an exceptional bull that is really quiet and I would hate to see him have to get another. Thanks,

Duncan

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A

Anonymous

How long will he live or how long will he breed?

I thought I was pushing MARK our limo bull at 8 years but was talking to another farmer who has a bull 11 and still breeding.

I would imagine they will start missing (catching )cows first we will get a sperm test (count) done before MARK goes out this spring

regards Art

> This is just a quick question that
> I realized I didn't (along with
> many other things) know even after
> growing up on a farm. How long
> will a herd bull usually live if
> allowed to go until he drops? My
> dad (retired) has an exceptional
> bull that is really quiet and I
> would hate to see him have to get
> another. Thanks,

> Duncan



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Anonymous

> This is just a quick question that
> I realized I didn't (along with
> many other things) know even after
> growing up on a farm. How long
> will a herd bull usually live if
> allowed to go until he drops? My
> dad (retired) has an exceptional
> bull that is really quiet and I
> would hate to see him have to get
> another. Thanks,

> Duncan

bulls like cows live just as long the problem is feet and legs and libido even more than sperm count. if he has the stamina and physical condition than he is good to go as long as he is able. most people replace to keep heifers which is about every two or three years.



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Anonymous

Duncan...think you probably asked 2 questions in one. "Lifespan" of a bull (bovine) probably depends on the breed. Longhorns can live into their teens and beyond. "Fertility" (lifespan) again depends on the breed, condition of the bull, libido, sperm count/motility/viability. "Keeping" (lifespan) of a bull depends on how many heifers & cows you want him to service without getting into "inbreeding" which can accentuate heredity defects if closely bred (to his dam or daughter). If you don't want to go to the expense and bother of owning a bull or taking some risks with a leased bull, you might want to consider artificial insemination using semen from a top-quality sire. If you have a top quality bull and he has serviced all of your second-generation (prior and future) heifers and cows you might want to keep him and let him rest or lease him out to others. Otherwise, it might be cheaper in the longrun to just purchase semen and AI your females.
 
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Anonymous

You still need at least one bull to clean up the cows with. Even the best breeders can only expect 65 to 70% conception through A.I. But then again you raise Longhorns and profitability obviously isn't your main goal.

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Anonymous

In 30 + years we've never used a cleanup bull. If she doesn't settle by the second service she grows wheels. Years ago we had problems with cows not settlingto AI, culling for fertility and conception by AI has reduced that problem to zero. We're dinky now but when we ran 100 some odd cows it was the same way. A local Black Angus breeder runs 350 cows, no bulls on the place except those that he sells.

dun

> You still need at least one bull
> to clean up the cows with. Even
> the best breeders can only expect
> 65 to 70% conception through A.I.
> But then again you raise Longhorns
> and profitability obviously isn't
> your main goal.
 
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Anonymous

I agree with Dun. Is it something like "Three strikes and you're out?" As in "hit the road Jack (or) Jill".
 
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Anonymous

Bear with me now i'm gonna talk about high quality cattle not longhorns. Old rule of thumb is that you have to get $1000 for a bred heifer to get your money back on her. Year 1, no calf, strike 1, Year two lets figure $350 for feed and misc. no calf, strike 2, Year 3 $350, no calf, strike 3. That's comes out to about $1700 sell her and make back about $400. this comes to $1300 on one cow that you will lose if you use your "3 stikes and your out" policy.Even the best cattlemen can only achieve around 75% A.I. conception. Say you have 100 head of heifers and 25 don't take to the A.I. take that times $1300. That comes out to $32500 in lost revenue, stick to your longhorns buddy that could of bought one hell of a bull.

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Anonymous

Some excellent points and info! A clarification on my earlier "Three Strikes and You're Out" analogy: I was referring to the USA Govt's "policy" on dealing with criminals (guess was bad comparison and/or irrelevant one). Sorry to any who didn't relate to my poor choice of humor. Anyhow, I too would agree that if I had a heifer that didn't produce a first calf in the first 2-3 years of age by natural service or A.I., that I would SERIOUSLY suspect something was wrong and put her on my "...You're Out" list. I and most others are not raising pets or running a halfway house for homeless unproductive critters. Every added year that no calves are produced from a female just compounds the price of freezer beef.
 
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Anonymous

> Some excellent points and info! A
> clarification on my earlier
> "Three Strikes and You're
> Out" analogy: I was referring
> to the USA Govt's
> "policy" on dealing with
> criminals (guess was bad
> comparison and/or irrelevant one).
> Sorry to any who didn't relate to
> my poor choice of humor. Anyhow, I
> too would agree that if I had a
> heifer that didn't produce a first
> calf in the first 2-3 years of age
> by natural service or A.I., that I
> would SERIOUSLY suspect something
> was wrong and put her on my
> "...You're Out" list. I
> and most others are not raising
> pets or running a halfway house
> for homeless unproductive
> critters. Every added year that no
> calves are produced from a female
> just compounds the price of
> freezer beef.

AI once, if the animal cycles again in 21 days AI her again. If she cycles again sell her. If you run a bull sell any late calvers. This is the best way to maintain fertility. Just because she has a calf doesn’t mean she’s making money. A cow that calves every 13 months is losing 60 to 90 pounds of gain every year.
 
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Anonymous

Depending on how hard the bull has had to work, and the quality of his feet and legs, and fertility, a bull can last for several years. You should not base his retention on his temperament, they are not pets, you should base keeping him on his fertility, tested annualy, quality of calves, soundness of feet and legs and body condition. feet can be trimmed, which can extend the life of the animal, but if the bull is not fertile, get a new one, there are lots of gentle bulls out there, that are young and can provide fresh genetics.

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