kobe beef > served beer and given massages?

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

the following question is part of an assignment for one of my classes. any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks in advance!


are the kobe beef cattle (wagyu) really served beer and given massages?
if so, are there schools that teach people to massage the cattle? who trains the people who massage them?
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
6
Location
MO Ozarks
I've heard that since I was in Japan in the 60's. The attached site says they are.

http://www.foodreference.com/html/artkobebeef.html

dun

zork":1radilx6 said:
the following question is part of an assignment for one of my classes. any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks in advance!


are the kobe beef cattle (wagyu) really served beer and given massages?
if so, are there schools that teach people to massage the cattle? who trains the people who massage them?
 

D.R. Cattle

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2003
Messages
2,125
Reaction score
0
Location
East Central Florida
I watched a program about it. The beer was served to them to make them docile and lazy. The massages were because they layed around lazily so much. Probably sit on the couch with the remote watching sports, and one of those stupid humans comes along and gives them a beer and a massage.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
6
Location
MO Ozarks
And people are smart and cattle are dumb? Hmmmmmmm

dun


D.R. Cattle":18pmwg4p said:
I watched a program about it. The beer was served to them to make them docile and lazy. The massages were because they layed around lazily so much. Probably sit on the couch with the remote watching sports, and one of those stupid humans comes along and gives them a beer and a massage.
 

eric

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 23, 2003
Messages
1,121
Reaction score
0
Location
Tx.......just north of Dallas
D.R. Cattle":sfkl0akg said:
I watched a program about it. The beer was served to them to make them docile and lazy. The massages were because they layed around lazily so much. Probably sit on the couch with the remote watching sports, and one of those stupid humans comes along and gives them a beer and a massage.

Heck, that sounds like any weekend during football season for me!
 

Jake

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 20, 2003
Messages
3,790
Reaction score
36
Location
North Central Kansas
they are given beer and just lounge around is what I've heard. makes the beef taste great and is so tender it's like butter
 
OP
A

Anonymous

thanks for all the great replies. but does anyone know anything about the massage schools people need to get trained at? that's the actual question i'm trying to answer for my class.
 

sam

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 27, 2003
Messages
109
Reaction score
1
Location
ne texas
the only kobe i heard of that got a beer and a massage was a basketball player in colorado
 

Tman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 1, 2004
Messages
156
Reaction score
0
Location
The Alamo City
Zork , sorry I looked everywhere and could not find anything on registered massage therapist for Kobe Beef.

I do wonder though what we would get if we crossed one of these cows with an Angus ???? Articles say this cow has been bred for marbling and refined for several hundred years. HMMMMMMM :?:
 

cherokeeruby

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2004
Messages
1,161
Reaction score
0
Location
TEXAS of course
Most of the cattle were influenced by British and Continental breeds for a few generations nearly 100 years ago. Brown Swiss, Shorthorn, Devon, Simmental, Ayrshire, Korean, Holstein and Angus had been imported by 1887 and impacted today's Wagyu.

Crossbreeding was prominent for several years, but when the price of crossbreds collapsed in 1910 no further crossbreeding was conducted. The result was selection for specific traits determined by region and extensive linebreeding was used to achieve those traits.

[/img]http://www.embryoplus.com/cattle_wa... pure as that article might have suggested.
wagyu.jpg
 

la4angus

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
5,063
Reaction score
0
Location
South La
Tman":1xz1p1k3 said:
Zork , sorry I looked everywhere and could not find anything on registered massage therapist for Kobe Beef.

I do wonder though what we would get if we crossed one of these cows with an Angus ???? Articles say this cow has been bred for marbling and refined for several hundred years. HMMMMMMM :?:

They are being crossed with Angus. High marbling, tender meat.
Full of flavor, pretty expensive for the typical supermarket meat case.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

heres the excerpt i found from http://www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m4PRN/2004_Feb_9/113062641/p1/article.jhtml

"Sake mash is fed to Wagyu cattle in Japan to keep them on feed and as a source of protein and energy. The diet for the Allen Brothers American Wagyu herd includes beer and liquor mashes, byproducts of the brewing and distilling industries and formulated by cattle nutritionists.

And what about those fabled massages supposedly given to cattle in Japan? Following an age-old tradition, a few Japanese farmers, mostly on small family farms, still do massage their Wagyu on the belief that it will somehow add to the quality of the beef. However, science has conclusively proved otherwise and the practice is rapidly fading. "There are no massages given to U.S.-bred Wagyu," says Hatoff.
"

The paper is due tomorrow. thanks to everyone who posted for the great information. thanks Tman for trying to research on it. [/url]
 

la4angus

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
5,063
Reaction score
0
Location
South La
zork":zi1dc368 said:
the following question is part of an assignment for one of my classes. any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks in advance!


are the kobe beef cattle (wagyu) really served beer and given massages?
if so, are there schools that teach people to massage the cattle? who trains the people who massage them?

This was taken from The Briggs Ranch Genetics, Rice Texas; web site.
There is lots of info on Wagyu cattle on this site.

Beer and Massage: Fact or Fiction

It is true that cattle are occasionally fed beer in Japan. Most cattle in Japan are essentially on feed all of their lives because grazing land is not available. There is some grass on the islands of Hokkaido and Kyushu but many cattle are raised in total confinement from birth to slaughter. Cattle are often fed a finishing diet for at least 16 months and are 30-34 months of age in the case of steers and up to 46 months old for heifers (heifers may have calved once prior to finishing) prior to slaughter. Because cattle are fed so long, and particularly in summer months when the interaction of fat cover, temperature and humidity depresses feed intake, many cattle go off feed. When this happens, beer is fed to the cattle to stimulate appetite. Japanese cattle feeders do not ascribe any magical powers to feeding beer nor do they associate the practice with an increase in carcass quality; they merely feed beer as part of an overall management program designed to keep the cattle on feed.
It is also true that cattle are sometimes massaged in Japan. Once again, this practice does not affect the deposition of marbling. It is a common-sense practice required occasionally for cattle that are tied in one place for months and have no opportunity to exercise. The massaging is done to make the animal more comfortable and relieve stress due to stiffness that can result from inactivity. Cattle often become so lethargic that they will not get up and eat without coaxing. The massaging prolongs the length of time that cattle can be fed before they go to slaughter and thereby increases fat deposition.
Brushing cattle with beer or sake is another practice which creates great interest. It, too, is rare and founded in practicality. Japanese beef cattle experts believe that hair coat and softness of skin are related to carcass quality in Wagyu cattle. Consequently, judges at livestock shows in Japan place considerable emphasis on haircoat in the ranking of fed cattle. Just as in the U.S., the winners of cattle shows in Japan receive substantial premiums upon the sale of the animals. Brushing the haircoat with sake improves the appearance and softness of the animal's haircoat and is therefore of economic importance in show cattle. In commercial cattle feeding operations, however, cattle are usually sold on the rail (after removing the hide and carcass quality is known). Consequently, haircoat is of no economic value and brushing with sake is not routinely practiced.
In addition to the practical aspects of feeding beer, massaging and brushing with liquors, these things are also done on occasion for the sake of the image associated with the gourmet meats that result from the production of Wagyu cattle. Ambiance and mystic are nearly as important in the eating experience as the flavor, juiciness and tenderness of the beef.


Introduction of Wagyu into the U.S.

Two Japanese Black and two Japanese Brown bulls were imported from Japan to the U.S. in March of 1976. At that time, nobody in the U.S. or Japan anticipated market liberalization and permission was granted by the Japanese government for the bulls to be exported. The four bulls were imported by a group led by Morris Whitney of Texas. The bulls were transported to Colorado State University where semen was collected. Later, the bulls were purchased by a veterinarian and they were moved to Texas. The bulls were mated to Angus and other breeds of cows to breed up toward purebred Wagyu. After a short time, the bulls and most of the semen were purchased by Wagyu Breeders, Inc. and were located near Georgetown, Texas. Cattle and semen were then sold to various breeders around the U.S. Because there were only four bulls available and only two of each breed, the black and red cattle were both used in grading up the crossbreeds to avoid problems associated with inbreeding. Consequently, the American Wagyu is really a hybrid of Japanese Black and Japanese Brown. As of 1991, the highest percentage American Wagyu animal in the U.S. is 63/64.
At the present time, the author estimates there are less than 300 breeding age Wagyu crossbred females in the U.S. that are 3/4 Wagyu or higher. However, by the end of 1991, at least 1,500-2,000 head of Wagyu-influenced cattle will be born in the U.S.--principally half-bloods. It is likely that as many of the 7,000 head of Wagyu crossbreds will be born in 1992. If carcass quality in these half-bloods is sufficient to compete favorably with dairy beef in Japan, it is conceivable that the number of American Wagyu cattle should continue to grow at a rapid pace for the next several years.
 

Latest posts

Top