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Anonymous

I'm 11 years old and just starting in the cattle industry and wondering which breed is the best and why. I was leaning toward Angus-cross but would like your opinions.

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Anonymous

hi,

its great that your that young and buying a cow or calve. I'm 15 and started when was 11 too.

what I did is I bought a calve and then upgraded from there. I now own 9 Hereford cross Angus and I love them.

If your located in Texas I have a great little heifer for sale.

i hope you reply and if you want to email me my email will be posted. So if you just wanted to talk cows or whatever.

good luck! jeremy

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Anonymous

>My family has been in the purebred Shorthorn business since 1932 so I'm ple going. We still lack commercial acceptance for bull sales in some scectoers. Good luck!rejudice to them, but we just added Angus this past fall. If on limited budget then buying crosses is your best bet, but if looking for somrthing to build from for the future then by all means get into purebreed cattle. Our Shorthorn breed is probably the hottest breed of cat I'm 11 years old and just starting
> in the cattle industry and
> wondering which breed is the best
> and why. I was leaning toward
> Angus-cross but would like your
> opinions.

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A

Anonymous

As an Angus breed, I think that's a great choice!:1: Seriously, Angus cows are good mothers, they're fertile and produce enough milk to raise a good calf. But not all black cows are Angus these days. Many other breeds have added enough Angus to turn them black, but not to get the strong points of the breed. So try to buy something from a trustworthy source. Good luck...

> I'm 11 years old and just starting
> in the cattle industry and
> wondering which breed is the best
> and why. I was leaning toward
> Angus-cross but would like your
> opinions.

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A

Anonymous

Chance,

You will probably get recommendations on all of the major breeds and every one could be the best depending on you climate, forage, management scheme, or target market. You need to make a plan concerning where you plan to sell you calves in order to determine what is the best breed for your situation. If you goal is to sell the calves at the local sale barn, then you need to schedule an appointment with the sale manager and find out what has been selling the best in the past and what they think would sell best in the future. If you are planning to eventually sell on a grid (most places require a semi load of fats to do this, approximately 35 head)you need to determine if they want quality (marbling) or quantity (lean meat yield) or both and adjust you English and Continential percentages accordingly to try to hit their target. For starting out, F1 crosses of 50%Angus and 50% Continential are hard to beat for any selling situation. They give you a lot of flexibility now and in the future and you get the added heterosis benefit. If you go with this mix I would suggest getting 50% Saler and 50% Angus F1's if good ones are available in your area. The Saler will get you the pounds and maternal benefits and the Angus will get you the marbling that the market wants. Hope this helps.

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Anonymous

Chance, You will probably get recommendations on all of the major breeds and every one could be the best depending on you climate, forage, management scheme, or target market. You need to make a plan concerning where you plan to sell you calves in order to determine what is the best breed for your situation. If you goal is to sell the calves at the local sale barn, then you need to schedule an appointment with the sale manager and find out what has been selling the best in the past and what they think would sell best in the future. If you are planning to eventually sell on a grid (most places require a semi load of fats to do this, approximately 35 head)you need to determine if they want quality (marbling) or quantity (lean meat yield) or both and adjust you English and Continential percentages accordingly to try to hit their target. For starting out, F1 crosses of 50%Angus and 50% Continential are hard to beat for any selling situation. They give you a lot of flexibility now and in the future and you get the added heterosis benefit. If you go with this mix I would suggest getting 50% Saler and 50% Angus F1's if good ones are available in your area. The Saler will get you the pounds and maternal benefits and the Angus will get you the marbling that the market wants. Hope this helps.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Chance,

You will probably get recommendations on all of the major breeds and every one could be the best depending on you climate, forage, management scheme, or target market. You need to make a plan concerning where you plan to sell you calves in order to determine what is the best breed for your situation. If you goal is to sell the calves at the local sale barn, then you need to schedule an appointment with the sale manager and find out what has been selling the best in the past and what they think would sell best in the future. If you are planning to eventually sell on a grid (most places require a semi load of fats to do this, approximately 35 head)you need to determine if they want quality (marbling) or quantity (lean meat yield) or both and adjust you English and Continential percentages accordingly to try to hit their target. For starting out, F1 crosses of 50%Angus and 50% Continential are hard to beat for any selling situation. They give you a lot of flexibility now and in the future and you get the added heterosis benefit. If you go with this mix I would suggest getting 50% Saler and 50% Angus F1's if good ones are available in your area. The Saler will get you the pounds and maternal benefits and the Angus will get you the marbling that the market wants. Hope this helps.

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

> In my opinion I favor the Limousin
> cattle breed due to their muscle
> and carcass traits, and their
> growth. But all breeds have their
> pros and cons.

i prefer the belgian blue cattle that have a ton of muscle and also can dress out at 80% i would go with them or shorthorns
 
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Anonymous

Belgen Blues do have a very high dressing percentage because they are doubled muscled. They look like over built body builder. Unfortunately they are also very muscled when they are born so that they have a much larger % of calving problems than the more common breeds. Look under the breed registry heading on this website for more information about them.

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