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Jersey with labor not progressing(photos)

lakeportfarms

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We have a Jersey that has been various stages of labor for about the past 12 hours. She really seemed to be having some contractions about 6 hours ago, but they have now diminished. About 8 am she popped out what appears to be her water, but it was compact and red, almost looked like she was prolapsing. Now a little more has come out and it appears to be her bag but there is no active labor going on. We went in and checked and it appears to be presenting properly, the hooves are 4-5" from showing. But there don't appear to be contractions.

Our vet isn't able to make it here until 7 pm, about 6 hours from now.

Now what?


 

lakeportfarms

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I've been checking some other resources, I think we have to intervene... Wish us luck but I'm a bit pessimistic...
 

CKC1586

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Is there another vet you can call??? What did your vet office advise you to do??? If she has been in labor since 8:00 and they cant get to you for 12 hours, won't be a good outcome. Anyone you can call to come help you??
 

randiliana

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Wishing you luck, those look like cleanings to me, and that is a bad, bad sign.You need to get that calf out as soon as possible, once the placenta detatches, the calf doens't have long to live. Find 2 legs, then feel for either the nose or the tail. Once you have detirmined that you have 2 feet and a nose/tail and that they are coming right, hook onto the feet with chains (preferably, twine will work in a pinch) and pull. Periodically checking to make sure that everything is coming right.
 

lakeportfarms

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Well, apparently one of the forelimbs was retained. We finally got it in position, but I'm certain the calf is dead, we didn't get to it quickly enough. It seems pretty big too. We still think the first expulsion looks like a placenta with the umbilical, so the fact it came out first is a puzzle.

We are waiting for the vet to arrive but working on pulling the calf anyway. This is all pretty new to us and we're still learning here, but appreciate the advice. At least we have some good news, I came across a brand new heifer calf yesterday in the pasture must have been born in the past 24 hours. We didn't know when the cow was bred, we thought she would be another month or so. The calf is doing well, I'll have to practice some roping if I hope to catch it, it runs so fast :D

Unfortunately we brought this cow to our house closer to the city (our farm is an hour away) because we knew she was due and wanted to keep an eye on her. So we didn't have many options for large animal vets, or call on some friends we know that have more experience. A dog is about the most any of the vets around here have worked on. We'll let the vet know about the possibility of twins. He has about 100 head of cattle himself so once he arrives I guess we'll know more.
 

lakeportfarms

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Well, vet just left. No luck with pulling the calf, it's just too big and the shoulders and head won't get past the cervix, and possibly the pelvis. If we kept it up we would have killed her on the spot. He gave her a shot of oxytocin that will hopefully dialate her a little more. But he was of the opinion that the calf was still too big to get through the birth canal and our best bet was a caesarian. She had been bred with a Hereford bull just before we purchased her last August. I guess we'll see how things go and make a decision what to do tomorrow if the oxytocin doesn't work. She's like a pet to us with a great personality and very docile, but it's hard to swallow the cost of the operation, not to mention the distance and time it may take to get her to Michigan State University.
 

CKC1586

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lakeportfarms":1podxbu8 said:
Well, vet just left. No luck with pulling the calf, it's just too big and the shoulders and head won't get past the cervix, and possibly the pelvis. If we kept it up we would have killed her on the spot. He gave her a shot of oxytocin that will hopefully dialate her a little more. But he was of the opinion that the calf was still too big to get through the birth canal and our best bet was a caesarian. She had been bred with a Hereford bull just before we purchased her last August. I guess we'll see how things go and make a decision what to do tomorrow if the oxytocin doesn't work. She's like a pet to us with a great personality and very docile, but it's hard to swallow the cost of the operation, not to mention the distance and time it may take to get her to Michigan State University.
I do not understand why the vet didn't do more than a shot! Apparently that vet doesn't know how to perform one? Why didn't vet find someone somewhere to help you??? C sections are not that costly, less than what you are going to lose with that dead calf and at this rate the dead cow. MSU is a great facility and they are pretty cost effective as well. I have dealt with the large animal vet clinic and they are great. Maybe you can call your vet that you use at your farm and either have them come and do what is needed to be done or have them refer you to get into MSU and maybe you can salvage the cow.
 

randiliana

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CKC1586":2vdnvnr4 said:
lakeportfarms":2vdnvnr4 said:
Well, vet just left. No luck with pulling the calf, it's just too big and the shoulders and head won't get past the cervix, and possibly the pelvis. If we kept it up we would have killed her on the spot. He gave her a shot of oxytocin that will hopefully dialate her a little more. But he was of the opinion that the calf was still too big to get through the birth canal and our best bet was a caesarian. She had been bred with a Hereford bull just before we purchased her last August. I guess we'll see how things go and make a decision what to do tomorrow if the oxytocin doesn't work. She's like a pet to us with a great personality and very docile, but it's hard to swallow the cost of the operation, not to mention the distance and time it may take to get her to Michigan State University.
I do not understand why the vet didn't do more than a shot! Apparently that vet doesn't know how to perform one? Why didn't vet find someone somewhere to help you??? C sections are not that costly, less than what you are going to lose with that dead calf and at this rate the dead cow. MSU is a great facility and they are pretty cost effective as well. I have dealt with the large animal vet clinic and they are great. Maybe you can call your vet that you use at your farm and either have them come and do what is needed to be done or have them refer you to get into MSU and maybe you can salvage the cow.


I'm with CKC on this one, you need to find a new vet. With the length of time this cow has already been in labour, she is as dialated as she is going to get. You've already got a dead calf, leaving her until the next day could very well end up with a dead cow. I don't know what a c-section is worth there, but here they are $300-$500. And, our vet can do a cow at our place if need be, not his ideal situation, but he can do it.
 

BARNSCOOP

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Just a thought. When I was faced with this possiblility in April my vet said that he could go inside and disasymbol the calf to remove it if he had to do so. Because we have commercial cattle the $500.00 for ceasarian was alot to save the cow if the calf would have been dead also. I know this is done with horses many times. Could this be a cost effective option for you?
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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I cannot believe the vet LEFT! Did he give you options that he could do right then & you did not want to do them - or - no options.
As said, the calf could/should have been cut up & removed. I'm not sure, but I don't think a vet would suggest c-section unless a calf was alive - which in this case it's not. So, why didn't he just cut it up & take it out in piecies?
 

redfornow

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":2uonazv8 said:
. So, why didn't he just cut it up & take it out in piecies?

Not the prettiest option? But if beats a dead cow?
Dont know why the vet didnt? Heck do it yourself?
Its nasty horrid work? but at times in the game it has to be done...
 

rockridgecattle

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If the vet was smart (i'm inclined to think not), the oxytocin would have worked in a few minutes to 15 minutes. Especially if the vet gave it in the tail ( spinal column)...find a vet and learn how to do it..a must for cattle producers.
The vet then could have pulled the calf, unless it was a hiefer.
Otherwise the vet should not have left without performing a c section.

end result
Dead calf
infection setting in
possible sick cow
possible not return to heat again...ever
possible dead cow...
...boy am i thankful for our vet.
 

Red Bull Breeder

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The vet i use would have cut it. would have charged maybe $50.00 to $75.00. But he is just one of them old country vet. Sure gonna miss him when he retires.
 

hillsdown

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If that vet came here he would be on the way to the hospital for a boot removal..

But most of us would never have let the vet leave with doing nothing, we know the options..

I am really biting my tongue here,, but my vet that I always use is 2 1/2 hours away and if he can't come a partner or associate will no matter what time.

lakeportfarms you also need to do some homework besides reading these boards ,take a couple animal husbandry courses during your spare time if you cannot find a decent reliable vet at least it will give you something..

I just hope you don't lose the cow as well but..
 

I luv herfrds

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So what has happened?

HD know what you are talking about with the boot. Need the neuro surgeon to do the removal right? :lol2: ;-)
 

mnmtranching

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So what happened to all the "Call The Vet" advice? I would have gone in there, straitened the calf out for a normal birth and pulled and pulled. It probably would have come out. :nod:
In the case it didn't [unlikely] I would have gone in, cut it up, saved the cow. :cowboy:
 

hillsdown

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mnmtranching":s2gnliaw said:
So what happened to all the "Call The Vet" advice? I would have gone in there, straitened the calf out for a normal birth and pulled and pulled. It probably would have come out. :nod:
In the case it didn't [unlikely] I would have gone in, cut it up, saved the cow. :cowboy:


First you have no idea what happened to the cow...........Next, the vet was called ;and just in case give lakeport your number so you can cut the calf out..

Funny funny post,,,,ya made me laugh for sure... :lol2: :clap:
 

mnmtranching

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HD, To bad I can't be every where. :frowns:
Could have done it, called in time could have saved the cow and calf. :nod:
But, :frowns: I would much rather spay or neuter your pet in the comfort of my laboritory then go out and work on your bovine :roll:
That way I can charge, ummm about what I want. :cowboy:
 
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