Jar the teeth loose

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Dave

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The 1997 F350 4 wheel drive that is my feed truck is not a smooth comfortable ride in the best of conditions. But driving across a field now covered with thousands of frozen solid cow pie will shake loose anything which is not securely tied down. I think I have whip lash from driving out to feed. Sometimes I forget the joys of winter. But it is still better than 100+ degree days in the summer.
 
I feel your pain guys. About once or twice't a year.... 😆
Those frozen pies are like BOULDERS!

Gotta go slowwwwww
Idling in first gear. Can't go any slower. I guess I could try riding the clutch or the brakes. I would probably kill the motor. 50 cows in a relatively small area leave a lot of cow pies.
 
I'm actually considering a tractor with front axle suspension for my next feeding tractor. If there is a next one

Got one with front axle suspension and cab suspension. It is amazing how much smoother the ride is. Doesn't get rid of all the bumps but it makes them a bit smoother.

Haven't started feeding hay yet, but once I do our snow gets deep enough that you don't notice cow pies or anything. Usually your tires don't even hit the ground your just driving on a packed snow road.
 
That frozen dung sure is hard on the body. I have a couple patches in fields where wild hogs have rooted out eating under the dung in past years. Between the high spots from the current dung and dips from the hogs it is rough. I lowered the pressure in my tractor tires to 12 lbs. and it helps some.
 
Just be glad they aren't fireant mounds....
We don't have fireants. How close together are their mounds? Down in the corner by the river the cow pies are about 2 or 3 feet apart. I was going to take a picture but it snowed this morning creating a hidden mine field of frozen cow pies.
 
We don't have fireants. How close together are their mounds? Down in the corner by the river the cow pies are about 2 or 3 feet apart. I was going to take a picture but it snowed this morning creating a hidden mine field of frozen cow pies.
You need to add more protein so they make flat pies instead of turds 🤔
 
We don't have fireants. How close together are their mounds? Down in the corner by the river the cow pies are about 2 or 3 feet apart. I was going to take a picture but it snowed this morning creating a hidden mine field of frozen cow pies.
Sometimes it seems they are 10 ft. apart or closer. Some get around a foot tall. Lots of smaller 3 and 4 inchers and everything in between. Also compounding the problem, our ground cracks open when it's dry so when it does start to rain you have divots created. Hit an ant hill and a hole might be right next to it.
 
In a bad drought that is what some areas of my pastures can look like - caused by pocket gophers. Our soil is sandy loam and well aerated but bumpy to drive around on.
I can't imagine dealing with pocket gophers or fire ants. At least I know these lumps will melt and they are pure fertilizer.
 
I can't imagine dealing with pocket gophers or fire ants. At least I know these lumps will melt and they are pure fertilizer.
Pocket gophers are worthless. Every mound creates not only a mound of dirt, but is the first place cheatgrass colonizes and spreads. But, it is all rangeland that takes 2.5 acres to support a cow for a month, so just have to put up with it. Feeds the snakes and badgers.
 

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