Is raising beef cattle for me

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Anonymous

I am quite intrigued by the whole aspect of cattle farming. Never realized it was such a science. Here is my question. Could a novice raise a small herd on about 65 acres working another full time job and expect to make a small profit? The land was purchased as an investment. Not looking for an immediate return, but say in five years or so. I pose this question to you as you all are the experts. Thank you for your input.

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OP
A

Anonymous

If the pasture is any good, or can be brought up to a good quality, you would probably be better off by leasing it to someone to raise cattle on. The learning curve when you first start is awfully steep, you can learn from whoever is raising cattle on the land and not have the expense/worry/heart ache/problems that go along with it.

dunmovin farms

> I am quite intrigued by the whole
> aspect of cattle farming. Never
> realized it was such a science.
> Here is my question. Could a
> novice raise a small herd on about
> 65 acres working another full time
> job and expect to make a small
> profit? The land was purchased as
> an investment. Not looking for an
> immediate return, but say in five
> years or so. I pose this question
> to you as you all are the experts.
> Thank you for your input.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Your attitude and understanding of the time frame makes me lean to yes you can make a small profit if you are careful.

Dun makes a good point about leasing the grass being easier, but some people really enjoy what we consider the grunt work of cattle.

If you are serious, I would form an alliance with an established producer who will sell you good cattle and provide some guidance. Don't consider Joe the guy down the lane that buys and sells at the local sales barn an established producer. Even if he has done that for 30 years. Even the breeder who has an annual sale with status quo buyers wouldn't be the best choice. You need someone who is progressive and can change with the markets and weather.

First step is to get the grass and fences ready. Understand numbers of cows per acre and when will they need to be fed. Good grass and management will allow longer grazing, less work and better return per head, but not necessarilly per acre.

On a small operation you will be better served if you can market calves with another producer with similar cattle, perhaps even the producer you bought from.

I offer these services, but only on a purebred basis. I have customers in Canada and the States with crossbred cattle that will sell top quality stock, but marketing would be difficult if the distance is too far.

Jason Trowbridge Southern Angus Farms Alberta Canada

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Excellent advice, as usual, from Dunmovin and Jason.

You might also consider the positive tax advantages of using this land in an agricultural business.

> I am quite intrigued by the whole
> aspect of cattle farming. Never
> realized it was such a science.
> Here is my question. Could a
> novice raise a small herd on about
> 65 acres working another full time
> job and expect to make a small
> profit? The land was purchased as
> an investment. Not looking for an
> immediate return, but say in five
> years or so. I pose this question
> to you as you all are the experts.
> Thank you for your input.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> If you lived close to dunmovin, maybe. but my answer is no, I do it bacause I love those cows but even using them to eat the hay that I can't sell to my horse customers. Hay that I need to get off the free ground I bale to keep it from turning into brush on the absentee owners. It is a marginal program( cow/calf).I would be better off spending the time I devote to the cattle flipping burgers and collecting a check.

[email protected]
 

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