IMPORTANT BASIC NEEDS LIST FOR EVERY CATTLE FARMER

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Anonymous

I know many of you out there have a lot more experience in this business than I do. I have learned some of what I know the hard way,and am still learning.

One thing I don't want to do if possible is to be caught off guard or unprepaired with lack of on hand Basic supplies that every cattleman/cattlewoman should keep on hand in case you get snowed inn and a vet can't get to you,which forces you to pull a calf are treat the illness yourself until your vet can get to you.

Your input in this list would be greatly appreciative. My list so far starts like this :calfpuller if possible,rope,.........what else? What basic meds.are in your meds.cabinet?Iodine,alcohol......ect. Your knowledge will be helpful to someone,as well as someone elses knowledge could be helpful to you.

Thanks.



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A

Anonymous

Add to your list a good six pack of Beer.

> I know many of you out there have
> a lot more experience in this
> business than I do. I have learned
> some of what I know the hard
> way,and am still learning.

> One thing I don't want to do if
> possible is to be caught off guard
> or unprepaired with lack of on
> hand Basic supplies that every
> cattleman/cattlewoman should keep
> on hand in case you get snowed inn
> and a vet can't get to you,which
> forces you to pull a calf are
> treat the illness yourself until
> your vet can get to you.

> Your input in this list would be
> greatly appreciative. My list so
> far starts like this :calfpuller
> if possible,rope,.........what
> else? What basic meds.are in your
> meds.cabinet?Iodine,alcohol......ect.
> Your knowledge will be helpful to
> someone,as well as someone elses
> knowledge could be helpful to you.

> Thanks.

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A

Anonymous

A calf puller chain, frozen colostrum on hand, some antibiotics for cattle (penicillin, Neuflor, Borgal, Lyquidmyocin (or however you spell it), Banimine, Azuim, etc), fresh straw available, blankets.
 
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Anonymous

My antibiotics and vaccines are in the door of my refrigerator. If I had room and an extra frig, I'd keep a frig just for the animal meds. I keep a small ice chest just for transporting meds and vaccines. I use it to bring meds & vaccines home from the vet's office, and I use it when vaccinating my cows. It keeps the sun off the vaccines, keeps them clean, and protects them from heat.

You also need syringes & lots of extra needles so you can draw up your meds without contaminating the contents. You should have an electrolyte mix or the ingredients on hand to make a decent electrolyte solution, and have good lighting available - at the least a good handheld light with extra fresh batteries on hand.

I can't think of a need for alcohol other than some alcohol wipes for cleaning off the tops of your meds before drawing them up. Water soluble lubricant for checking the position of the calf.

I keep a clean bucket and towels handy. I fill the bucket with hot water and scrub up with soap before checking the cow, and it's handy to have to clean yourself up with afterwards. I put a roll of paper towels in the bucket ahead of time along with a couple of old, clean bath towels. I like to quickly clean off the back end of the cow before going in to check the calf. Some may laugh at that, but the fewer bugs you introduce into the cow's vagina, the less chance of infection.

We tattoo & ear tag our calves at birth, so that equipment is in the vet box.

You also will want to have the equipment available to tube feed a calf if the time should come that is necessary. And, learn how to do it ahead of time from your vet!

I milk out some colostrum from my older cows at calving to keep in the freezer. So, I have some containers ready for that.

I haven't re-read yours or the other posts before writing this, so there may be some duplication, and I'm sure I've forgotten something!
 
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