Imagine towing a gooseneck with this!

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I doubt that any fully (and properly) loaded gooseneck trailer will be capable of actually locking up the wheels with electric brakes... I've never seen it at least..., and that's what's really NECESSARY to be able to be fully safe.
Well that's not true.

Locked brakes mean loss of control as well as longer stopping distance.
 
Had a half ton when I started farming here at this place... Was selling hay in small squares... would load it up as full as I could and haul to customers. Remember going down the road with it tilting from side to side as the suspension would sway... could hardly keep it on the road! Good times! Traded it for a 1T single wheel diesel and a gooseneck. Fully loaded, blew out a rear tire on the truck at speed... next truck was a 1T Dually diesel for more stability, greater safety. Have NEVER regretted it, and unless I'm giving up pulling, I'll stick with the dually, no question.... so ChevyT, I guess I'm the poster child for your previous post! :D
 
If you dispise electric trailer brakes so much break out your checkbook and switch over to electric over hydraulic disks. More braking power than the tires will hold.
 
Last thing I want is tires locking up while braking. I set and adjust trailer brakes so that they WON'T lock up during hard brake. Once a tire is locked up or spinning its tractive force is basically zero.
I agree... but you definitely want the braking system to have the physical capability of being able to lock those wheels.... or you'll not have enough braking capability to control in an emergency. You may not actually force them to "lock"... but you want them to BE ABLE to... and not be limited against that by "the system's physical capabilities".

How big of a load do you set those brakes for? Do you ever exceed that load then? If you don't "adjust your brakes higher" then for each load, you're not going to have the CAPABILITY to slow that load down like you need to. Have you ever put a load on where you didn't feel that you COULD ACHIEVE enough brake on the trailer brakes to sufficiently get it slowed down in an emergency? Have the brakes always been working "up to par"... and to your satisfaction? I know that MOST trailers with electric brakes on them that I've pulled, be it mine with new brakes in them, or others trailers, they typically disappoint me... if the trailer is loaded to its rated capacity or above.

And let's be honest... MOST OF US have loaded trailers beyond their rated capacity from time to time. And yes... that's "on us", not the manufacturer... I agree. But it's also pretty darn common. Lots of guys don't figure they've reached the "rated capacity" until the frame breaks. That's why I drive a dually, and why my trailer has 12,000# axles under it... so "more of the time", it's not overloaded.
 
Had a half ton when I started farming here at this place... Was selling hay in small squares... would load it up as full as I could and haul to customers. Remember going down the road with it tilting from side to side as the suspension would sway... could hardly keep it on the road! Good times! Traded it for a 1T single wheel diesel and a gooseneck. Fully loaded, blew out a rear tire on the truck at speed... next truck was a 1T Dually diesel for more stability, greater safety. Have NEVER regretted it, and unless I'm giving up pulling, I'll stick with the dually, no question.... so ChevyT, I guess I'm the poster child for your previous post! :D
There are always going to be people that make do with what they have and do it well... and others that could drive a tank and get into trouble.

I've watched people make their trucks perform way beyond their rated capacities, I'm one of them, and their vehicles last and run great when they sell them. Other people will be buying the biggest, toughest thing they can find because they've broken everything they've ever owned, and they sing the praises of bigger is better because it takes them longer to abuse their truck into the grave. And they often talk like owning a bigger, more expensive rig gives them a bigger penis or a lock on being the smart guy in every room.

But it still remains that there are people making do with what they have and doing it well...
 
There are always going to be people that make do with what they have and do it well... and others that could drive a tank and get into trouble.

I've watched people make their trucks perform way beyond their rated capacities, I'm one of them, and their vehicles last and run great when they sell them. Other people will be buying the biggest, toughest thing they can find because they've broken everything they've ever owned, and they sing the praises of bigger is better because it takes them longer to abuse their truck into the grave. And they often talk like owning a bigger, more expensive rig gives them a bigger penis or a lock on being the smart guy in every room.

But it still remains that there are people making do with what they have and doing it well...
Sticker in a big mine payloader I was running at one time... "Any piece of equipment can be destroyed if you try hard enough!"
 
There are always going to be people that make do with what they have and do it well... and others that could drive a tank and get into trouble.

I've watched people make their trucks perform way beyond their rated capacities, I'm one of them, and their vehicles last and run great when they sell them. Other people will be buying the biggest, toughest thing they can find because they've broken everything they've ever owned, and they sing the praises of bigger is better because it takes them longer to abuse their truck into the grave. And they often talk like owning a bigger, more expensive rig gives them a bigger penis or a lock on being the smart guy in every room.

But it still remains that there are people making do with what they have and doing it well...
My grandad's daily work truck was still a '59 Apache with the 235 in-line six and three on the tree, when I proudly drove up in my '78 Cheyenne 3/4 ton 4wd. He just shook his head and mumbled something about me needing to learn how to drive. The general attitude among the older generation was that 4 wheel drive was for people who didn't know how to drive, or at least that if you needed it, you we're somewhere you didn't belong anyway.

Grandad upgrade to a 1970 Ford 3/4 ton 2wd in 1995 (because it was the newest he could get and still put antique tags on it).

My point being, I agree with you. In fact my daily driver is a half ton crew cab two wheel drive, for the past 12 years. It checks cows and fence on the place, and occasionally pulls an 18' car hauler. If I feel like I may get stuck, or tear up the field, I take the side-by-side or my wife's truck, or the tractor...............or I wait.

That said, I'm shopping for a 4wd 3/4 ton at the moment ;)
 
Yeah, it all depends on what you will need/expect/demand them to be doing most of the time. If you rarely pull a trailer, you'll probably get by with a 1/2T, and probably can get by with a 2WD. If you live in the north, having 4WD is always nice, if you want to get anything done much at all for half the year, because of snow... if you don't have snow much at all, a 4WD could easily become a "luxury"... especially if you don't leave the roads much. If you pull trailers and go off-road, and especially if you pull big trailers with big loads, having 4WD, a heavier frame, undercarriage, driveline, wheels and brakes is obviously going to be a plus. Duals help to stabilize and are an asset for safety. And the torque and fuel economy of a diesel can be helpful too (although with the cost differential between diesel and gas lately, it's gotten awfully hard to justify that added investment).

Guy I bought my farm from always got by with a 2WD 1/2T with posi. Said it was the same as any other 4WD... (not...............). If he needed anything more than that, he'd just put chains on! That works too... if you don't mind putting chains on to get you off that cowpie every time you park on a little bit of a slope.

To each his own. Still think this Tesla has a long way to go appealing to most of us on here!
 
If you dispise electric trailer brakes so much break out your checkbook and switch over to electric over hydraulic disks. More braking power than the tires will hold.
My last big GN trailer I sprung for those disc brakes. There is a world of difference!

Most any properly adjusted and functioning electric brake system will lock the tires fully loaded if you turn the box up enough. Truly getting a good stop out of those systems is knowing how to set it so it doesn't do that, as well as setting the timing on the box correctly.
 
Can anybody tell my why we don't have air bag suspension on EVERY 3/4 and above pickup yet? How long has that been the primary suspension system on every semi? Why would the pickup manufacturers NOT be putting this on their pickups? And while we're at it, WHY don't we have air brakes on them too???? With air brakes on all of our pickup pulled trailers????
Because of licensing requirements is a big one!
 
what grinds my gears is the gov't rebates for EV's, and the true cost of running them hasn't been realized yet... What happens when there are no IC engines using all that fuel that has road tax on it... now your domestic power is going to be targeted for road tax. (and don't forget your domestic power is going to go up in price anyhow to pay for all the new electrical infrastructure to support these EV's)
If I was living in the city and commuting in traffic I think I'd consider an EV.. commuting in traffic is where they do best. I think for highway and towing, we'd best develop good hybrids.. If semi trucks had a small 1-200hp diesel generator that was running at peak efficiency, coupled with the regenerative braking of the electric you could get good range and it probably could drive anything but the worst mountain passes.

The biggest problem with electric is the lack of energy density in a battery. Diesel is 64 times more energy dense than the best lithium battery, it takes a 64 pounds of batteries to go the same distance as 1 pound of diesel. Even when the inefficiency of a combustion engine is factored in, there's still a huge gap.

From what I've seen in test results of the F150 Lightning, range while towing is dismal.

Locomotives use a diesel electric power plant mostly because to avoid the added power losses and complexity of getting power to all of those drive wheels mechanically. Big rigs are equally efficient just as they are, there is not much to be gained by adding a generator and motors in place of gears and shafts.
 
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