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IM Shots - How to restrain cow w/ headgate?

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Anonymous

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The new Drovers magazine came today and one of the ads is for a manual neck extender that mounts to the front of the LEI Manual Chute. "The unit allows gentle extension of the neck for shots and implants. It also enables the animal to stand quietly so the head and eyes can be treated." Linn Enterprises, Linn, KS 800-252-0847

A brochure from them might give you some good ideas.
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
I found a website for the company - there is one pic of the extender on this page:

<A HREF="http://www.linnent.com/cattlechutes.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www.linnent.com/cattlechutes.html</A>
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
Thank you for providing the link. I had not looked at products from this company before. I like their emphasis on safety. I’ve decided that I need to quit being stingy and invest in better cattle handling equipment so working cattle is less of an “extreme sport”.
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
You're welcome. I was not aware of this company before I saw the ad in Drover's the other day.

Investing in decent equipment, if only piece by piece, saves valuable time, decreases physical danger, and generally makes life better for you and for the cows. At least that's the conclusion I've come to.

When we started with our cows in '91, we desperately needed portable panels. Of course, our money was in the cows, but we started buying 3 to 6 panels every year, and now have what we need. Every year, the job got just a little bit easier because we were moving fewer panels around. Same thing with feeders and water supplies. Work on it every year and eventually things will seem to click.

We have hard winters and it's bad enough to haul and stack hay in the barn without having to trudge through the snow with bales because there happens to be a couple of bulls "over there." We don't have heavy duty equipment and finally started setting up two outdoor haystacks along with what was in the barn. This way there's always hay near a feeder, and the outside stacks are gone by the time grazing season hits. The best hay in the barn is close to the feeders for the new mother cows and for the horses. The bulls winter at the other end with their own stack.

I like your description of "extreme sport!" LOL I work part time in the city, quite a ways from home. I happened to drive by a gym one afternoon in the city and saw through a large window, an entire roomful of yuppies feverishly working out on all the equipment.

I just burst out laughing. The previous night I had been out with a board chasing an errant cow that had come into heat, had somehow gotten out of her corral, and was by a gate trying to entice the bulls to leave their corral. That's my definition of aerobics!

> Thank you for providing the link.
> I had not looked at products from
> this company before. I like their
> emphasis on safety. I’ve decided
> that I need to quit being stingy
> and invest in better cattle
> handling equipment so working
> cattle is less of an “extreme
> sport”.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
> You're welcome. I was not aware of
> this company before I saw the ad
> in Drover's the other day.

> Investing in decent equipment, if
> only piece by piece, saves
> valuable time, decreases physical
> danger, and generally makes life
> better for you and for the cows.
> At least that's the conclusion
> I've come to.

> When we started with our cows in
> '91, we desperately needed
> portable panels. Of course, our
> money was in the cows, but we
> started buying 3 to 6 panels every
> year, and now have what we need.
> Every year, the job got just a
> little bit easier because we were
> moving fewer panels around. Same
> thing with feeders and water
> supplies. Work on it every year
> and eventually things will seem to
> click.

> We have hard winters and it's bad
> enough to haul and stack hay in
> the barn without having to trudge
> through the snow with bales
> because there happens to be a
> couple of bulls "over
> there." We don't have heavy
> duty equipment and finally started
> setting up two outdoor haystacks
> along with what was in the barn.
> This way there's always hay near a
> feeder, and the outside stacks are
> gone by the time grazing season
> hits. The best hay in the barn is
> close to the feeders for the new
> mother cows and for the horses.
> The bulls winter at the other end
> with their own stack.

> I like your description of
> "extreme sport!" LOL I
> work part time in the city, quite
> a ways from home. I happened to
> drive by a gym one afternoon in
> the city and saw through a large
> window, an entire roomful of
> yuppies feverishly working out on
> all the equipment.

> I just burst out laughing. The
> previous night I had been out with
> a board chasing an errant cow that
> had come into heat, had somehow
> gotten out of her corral, and was
> by a gate trying to entice the
> bulls to leave their corral.
> That's my definition of aerobics!

"EXTREME COW AEROBICS" ( OPEN 24-7 ) FOR REAL MEN AND WOMAN NOT AFRAID TO STRAP ON RUBBER BOOTS AND LEATHER GLOVES. TWO FACED YUPPIE LONG NAILS AND PRETTY SISSY BOYS SHOULD NOT APPLY!
 

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